Equity & Diversity

College Offers Lessons Tied to Katrina Documentary

By Katie Ash — January 23, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Includes updates and/or revisions.

With a $975,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, a team of educators at Teachers College, Columbia University, is developing curriculum materials linked to a recent Spike Lee documentary on the devastation Hurricane Katrina wrought in New Orleans.

“When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts,” directed by Mr. Lee and broadcast on HBO last August, focuses on four different aspects of the August 2005 storm and its aftermath.

The New York City-based foundation, which underwrote the film, got in touch with Margaret Smith Crocco, a professor of social studies and education at Teachers College, in September about the project. She and her colleagues have crafted a 100-page curriculum to accompany the film.

Titled “Teaching ‘The Levees,’ ” the curriculum will feature an essay about the history of New Orleans and three sets of lesson plans intended for different audiences: high school students, college students, and adults.

Sections on history, geography, civics, and economics are part of the first set, which is tailored to high school social studies students. The college-level set is designed for history courses, while the third set is suitable for adult learners in community and religious groups.

The curriculum book, to be published by Teachers College Press, is also to include a detailed viewer’s guide that divides the film into smaller parts so that educators can easily navigate the four-hour documentary. The package will come with a three-disc set of DVDs. Thirty thousand free copies will be available to educators upon request through www.teachingthelevees.com.

The curriculum book is slated to be available in August, and the full packages are scheduled for distribution in September.

A version of this article appeared in the January 24, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Leadership in Education: Building Collaborative Teams and Driving Innovation
Learn strategies to build strong teams, foster innovation, & drive student success.
Content provided by Follett Learning
School & District Management K-12 Essentials Forum Principals, Lead Stronger in the New School Year
Join this free virtual event for a deep dive on the skills and motivation you need to put your best foot forward in the new year.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Privacy & Security Webinar
Navigating Modern Data Protection & Privacy in Education
Explore the modern landscape of data loss prevention in education and learn actionable strategies to protect sensitive data.
Content provided by  Symantec & Carahsoft

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Equity & Diversity Opinion Enrollment Down. Achievement Lackluster. Should This School Close?
An equity researcher describes how coming district-reorganization decisions can help preserve Black communities in central cities.
Francis A. Pearman
5 min read
Illustration: Sorry we are closed sign hanging outside a glass door.
iStock/Getty
Equity & Diversity School Librarians Are Creating Free Book Fairs. Here's How
School librarians are turning to free book fairs in an effort to get more books to children in poverty.
9 min read
Students at Mount Vernon Library in Raleigh, N.C., pose with free books after their book fair. School librarian Julia Stivers started the free book fair eight years ago, in an effort to make the traditional book fair more equitable. Alternative versions of book fairs have been cropping up as a way to help students' build their own personal library, without the costs associated with traditional book fair models.
Students at Mount Vernon Library in Raleigh, N.C., pose with free books after their book fair. School librarian Julia Stivers started the free book fair eight years ago, in an effort to make the traditional book fair more equitable. Alternative versions of book fairs have been cropping up as a way to help students' build their own personal library, without the costs associated with traditional book fair models.
Courtesy of Julia Stivers
Equity & Diversity Download Want to Start Your Own Free Book Fair? Here's How You Can Get Started
Book fairs may shut out families in poverty. Here's how some school librarians are making free versions.
1 min read
Photo of book fair.
iStock
Equity & Diversity A School District Could Offer Reparations to Black Citizens. How It Might Look
Reparations could come in the form of cash payments paid for by donations or a new tax.
5 min read
Photograph of the shadows of protestors as they march on a street
iStock/Getty