Families & the Community

Chicago To Size Up Parents With ‘Checklists’

By Michelle Galley — May 31, 2000 3 min read

Starting next fall, Chicago parents are scheduled to receive reports every five weeks from their children’s public schools. But unlike most correspondence between teachers and parents, these reports will focus less on student performance than on the parents’ own role in their children’s education.

In what observers have called the first districtwide attempt at such communication between teachers and parents, Chicago school officials announced earlier this month that they are developing checklists that will register how well students are prepared for school.

Some items are to be directly tied to academics—such as whether students complete homework assignments and bring their textbooks to school. Others are to focus on students’ health and well- being, including whether they are eating breakfast, are receiving health care, and are bringing needed medications and eyeglasses to school.

Paul G. Vallas

“Basically we feel that parent involvement is key,” said Paul G. Vallas, the chief executive officer of the 430,000-student district. “We see this as a mechanism to reach out to parents.”

But not everyone feels that using parent checklists, which Mr. Vallas also called parent report cards, is an effective way of increasing communication.

“The concept of this policy is not one we think would be very effective,” said Julie Woestehoff, the executive director of Parents United for Responsible Education, a local group that is often at odds with the Vallas administration.

Lists Won’t Be Mandatory

And at least one Chicago group wonders if the plan will actually come to fruition.

Mr. Vallas “has ideas that develop a mile a minute,” said Jackie Gallagher, a spokeswoman for the Chicago Teachers Union, the 33,500-member local affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers. She said union officials are going to wait and see how the idea plays out in practice before taking a stance on it.

While some Chicago schools already use similar forms of parent-teacher communication, the district may be breaking new ground by asking all schools to participate in the program.

Schools will not be required to use the checklist model, but Mr. Vallas said that he plans to require that schools have some type of community-outreach program starting this fall.

“We are very interested to see how it works,” said Patty Yoxall, a spokeswoman for the National PTA, which is based in Chicago. Ms. Yoxall warned that the checklists should not develop into critiques of parenting skills that “could turn people off.”

And some parents already know what it takes to ensure that their child is ready for school, which means that it won’t be effective for all parents, said Brenda Diehl, the president of the Illinois PTA.

She added that checklists are less inflammatory than report cards, which suggest that parents are being graded even if they don’t actually assign letter grades. “I hope that Chicago Public Schools provides a welcoming environment for parents,” she said.

Parents generally hear from school only when there is a problem, said Ms. Woestehoff of PURE. She added that good communication has to flow both ways.

“This report card is a one-way communication of parents’ weaknesses,” she said. Another problem, she said, is that five weeks is too long to wait to express certain concerns to parents. For example, if children are attending school without their eyeglasses, their parents should be informed immediately, she said.

A group of community-based organizations will be working with district officials to develop the checklists, which will vary depending on a student’s grade level, Mr. Vallas said. “We are not developing this in-house in a vacuum,” he said.

Missing Link

Beverly Tunney, the president of the Chicago Principals and Administrators Association, said she supports the idea of sending home checklists. Parents have traditionally been the missing link in a child’s education, she said.

Beverly Tunney

“Parents need to be held accountable for doing their part,” Ms. Tunney said. “We want to make sure we are working together as a team to do what is best for the child.”

Because many parents whose children attend public schools are inexperienced, the checklists will facilitate parent involvement by keeping them better informed, Mr. Vallas said.

“The bottom line is: We are either going to talk the talk or walk the walk,” he said. “Let’s stop complaining about parent involvement and do something about it.”

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 31, 2000 edition of Education Week as Chicago To Size Up Parents With ‘Checklists’

Events

School & District Management Webinar What's Ahead for Hybrid Learning: Putting Best Practices in Motion
It’s safe to say hybrid learning—a mix of in-person and remote instruction that evolved quickly during the pandemic—is probably here to stay in K-12 education to some extent. That is the case even though increasing
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Building Equitable Systems: Moving Math From Gatekeeper to Opportunity Gateway
The importance of disrupting traditional American math practices and adopting high-quality math curriculum continues to be essential for changing the trajectory of historically under-resourced schools. Building systems around high-quality math curriculum also is necessary to
Content provided by Partnership for L.A. Schools
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Measuring & Supporting Student Well-Being: A Researcher and District Leader Roundtable
Students’ social-emotional well-being matters. The positive and negative emotions students feel are essential characteristics of their psychology, indicators of their well-being, and mediators of their success in school and life. Supportive relationships with peers, school
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Families & the Community Photos PHOTOS: Schools as COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics
A look at how and where school districts are using their facilities to host Covid-19 vaccination clinics.
Education Week Photo Staff
1 min read
Vaccine recipients meet with shot givers at the Anchorage School District headquarters. The Anchorage School District headquarters hosted a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Anchorage, Alaska, on February 3, 2021.
Vaccine recipients meet with shot givers at the Anchorage School District headquarters. The Anchorage School District headquarters hosted a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Anchorage, Alaska, on February 3, 2021.
Marc Lester/for Education Week
Families & the Community Audio A Storm, Power Outages, and a Pandemic: Texas Educators and Families Describe a School Year Upended
On top of the deadly pandemic, millions of people in Texas lost heat and water for days after a winter storm. Hear how families and educators coped.
2 min read
Jack Fitzgerald, 14, an 8th grader at Hogg Middle School in Houston, Texas, plays Rocket League at home this week when school was cancelled because of icy weather and widespread power outages. Jack's family had to stay with friends briefly when their home lost power and indoor temperatures plunged.
Jack Fitzgerald, 14, an 8th grader at Hogg Middle School in Houston, Texas, plays Rocket League at home this week when school was cancelled because of icy weather and widespread power outages. Jack's family had to stay with friends briefly when their home lost power and indoor temperatures plunged.
Courtesy of Ginny Goldman
Families & the Community Leader To Learn From Relying on Community Values: How One School Leader Advocates for Vulnerable Families
Carissa Purnell’s work at the Family Resource Centers in Salinas, Calif., is a lifeline for families, many of them migrant farm workers.
7 min read
Carissa Purnell, director of the Family Resource Centers for the Alisal Union School District in Salinas, Calif.
Carissa Purnell, director of the Family Resource Centers for Alisal Union School District in Salinas, Calif., provides essential services and critical information to vulnerable families.
Nic Coury for Education Week
Families & the Community Leader To Learn From Driving Academic Improvement by Empowering Parents
Central to turning around public education in Detroit is reengaging the parents who had been largely cut out of the district.
10 min read
Nikolai Vitti, superintendent of Detroit Public Schools, and Sharlonda Buckman, assistant superintendent of family and community engagement, have made parental engagement a key part of their turnaround strategy.
Nikolai Vitti and Sharlonda Buckman of Detroit Public Schools in Detroit, Mich.
Brittany Greeson for Education Week