September 6, 2017

Education Week, Vol. 37, Issue 03
Harvey Milk, the slain San Francisco Board of Supervisors official, cropped up in an early version of California’s history/social studies framework—but there was little else about LGBT history, advocates say.
Harvey Milk, the slain San Francisco Board of Supervisors official, cropped up in an early version of California’s history/social studies framework—but there was little else about LGBT history, advocates say.
AP-File
Curriculum LGBT Lessons Spread Slowly, Despite Mandate
California broke ground by requiring schools to teach about the contributions of LGBT people, but it’s been slow-going ever since.
Stephen Sawchuk, September 5, 2017
4 min read
Education Letter to the Editor Reading Program Reaps Rewards
To the Editor:
Education Week reports that the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy report pushing for greater early-childhood-education advocacy by its members (Pediatricians Urged to Get Involved With Early-Childhood Education). Both Education Week and the policy report itself note that cost is a significant problem.
September 5, 2017
1 min read
Civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, front left, accompanies Martin Luther King Jr., at a gathering in Los Angeles in 1965. Teachers studying LGBT history use primary and secondary sources on Rustin to learn how his sexual orientation influenced his work.
Civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, front left, accompanies Martin Luther King Jr., at a gathering in Los Angeles in 1965. Teachers studying LGBT history use primary and secondary sources on Rustin to learn how his sexual orientation influenced his work.
Don Brinn/AP-File
Curriculum LGBT History Gets Short Shrift in Schools. There's an Effort to Change That
A pair of Massachusetts educators are chipping away at the nearly total absence of context for LGBT individuals in the K-12 curriculum.
Stephen Sawchuk, September 5, 2017
8 min read
Education Letter to the Editor Four-Day Week Has Real Benefits
To the Editor: I read with vested interest Paul Hill's essay on the four-day week ("Beware the Four-Day School-Week Trap," July 19, 2017). While his points are valid, he misses several reasons why rural school districts are opting for only teaching four days. The Lincoln County school dist...
September 5, 2017
1 min read
Education Letter to the Editor How to Solve the Teacher Shortage
To the Editor:
Many, many issues of Education Week have articles about the teacher shortage. This shortage is a huge issue in many parts of our country. If we don't think big and take action now, thousands of children will lack qualified teachers. The children who need them most will be stuck with underqualified teachers or substitutes.
September 5, 2017
1 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
Accountability Commentary How to Define Public Schooling in the Age of Choice?
Schools must meet these five responsibilities to truly be defined as “public,” writes education professor Sarah M. Stitzlein.
Sarah M. Stitzlein, September 5, 2017
5 min read
Test Scores Don’t Tell the Whole Story School success is often measured by test scores, but they don’t paint an accurate picture, says Jack Schneider
Thomas Rettig
Assessment Commentary Test Scores Don't Tell the Whole Story (Q&A)
School success is often measured by test scores, but they don’t paint an accurate picture, says Jack Schneider.
September 5, 2017
6 min read
Special Education Complying With Spec. Ed. Bias Rule May Force Spending Shifts
School systems that identify, discipline, or segregate students with disabilities at a disproportionate rate gird for a requirement that they set aside some federal aid for early-intervention remedies.
Christina A. Samuels, September 5, 2017
6 min read
Researchers, working with a Buffalo public charter school and a digital media company, use a 360-degree virtual reality camera to shoot classroom scenarios with real students. The scenarios are meant to help preservice teachers practice classroom management.
Researchers, working with a Buffalo public charter school and a digital media company, use a 360-degree virtual reality camera to shoot classroom scenarios with real students. The scenarios are meant to help preservice teachers practice classroom management.
Brett Carlsen for Education Week
Executive Skills & Strategy How Virtual Reality Is Helping Train New Teachers
The technology offers a middle ground between college classwork and a real K-12 classroom, experts say.
Liana Loewus, September 5, 2017
7 min read
School & District Management New Tool Alerts Teachers When Students Give Up on Tests
What can you learn when students give up on the test? A new measure offers clues.
Sarah D. Sparks, September 5, 2017
5 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act Federal Educational-Leadership Initiatives in a Budget 'Pickle'
The threat of federal budget cuts has some states wondering how they'll deliver on plans to beef up principal and teacher professional-development efforts.
Denisa R. Superville, September 5, 2017
6 min read
Syrian refugee children Shahed Qassab, 6, left, Asem Qassab, 6, holding cellphone, Abdul-Razzag Hindawi, 8, and Haneen Tareef, 6, use an educational app to play learning games at a refugee camp in Amman, Jordan.
Syrian refugee children Shahed Qassab, 6, left, Asem Qassab, 6, holding cellphone, Abdul-Razzag Hindawi, 8, and Haneen Tareef, 6, use an educational app to play learning games at a refugee camp in Amman, Jordan.
Marit Hverven/Norad
International Cellphones, Apps Power Learning for Syrian Refugees
United Nations agencies have facilitated ed-tech programs for students in refugee camps worldwide, but the Syrian conflict has drawn an especially high level of involvement.
Sarah Schwartz, September 5, 2017
8 min read
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, and their son Barron Trump, 11, walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Aug. 27, following their return from the Presidential retreat at Camp David, Md.
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, and their son Barron Trump, 11, walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Aug. 27, following their return from the Presidential retreat at Camp David, Md.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Federal Trump's Youngest Son Joins Back-to-School Crowd
Barron Trump, who finished up the last school year at a private school in New York City, is attending St. Andrew's Episcopal School in suburban Maryland this school year.
Alyson Klein, September 5, 2017
4 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act States Adjust Course on School Turnaround Districts
The new school year brings changes for states that are starting—or, in at least one case, dropping—state-directed efforts to improve some of their lowest-performing schools.
Daarel Burnette II, September 5, 2017
6 min read
College & Workforce Readiness News in Brief Few College-Bound Students From Los Angeles Earn Degrees
Too few graduates of the Los Angeles school district are earning a college degree, concludes research released last week.
Tribune News Service, September 5, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief High-Salaried Superintendent in Calif. Charged With Corruption
A former Southern California school superintendent who made more than $600,000 in a year has been charged with a dozen counts of corruption.
The Associated Press, September 5, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief School Police May Once Again Acquire Military Equipment
President Donald Trump last week rescinded Obama-era restrictions on local police agencies' ability to acquire surplus equipment from the U.S. Department of Defense, a change that clears the way for school police to once again obtain military equipment through the program, known as 1033.
Evie Blad, September 5, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief DeVos Hires Former For-Profit Dean to Oversee Fraud Investigations
U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos last week picked a former official at an embattled for-profit university to head the agency's unit investigating fraud at for-profit colleges, prompting criticism that the Trump administration was promoting industry interests.
The Associated Press, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Anthony Holmes, left, and Darrell Cannon, victims of torture by the former Police Commander Jon Burge, speak at a news conference in Chicago, on Aug. 28, where it was announced that Chicago Public Schools students will be taught about the police torture scandal that has dogged the city and the police department. Listening at right is Chicago Public Schools CEO Forrest Claypool.
Anthony Holmes, left, and Darrell Cannon, victims of torture by the former Police Commander Jon Burge, speak at a news conference in Chicago, on Aug. 28, where it was announced that Chicago Public Schools students will be taught about the police torture scandal that has dogged the city and the police department. Listening at right is Chicago Public Schools CEO Forrest Claypool.
James Foster/Chicago Sun-Times via AP
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Chicago District Adds Scandal on Police Torture to Curriculum
A police-brutality scandal that remains one of the most shameful episodes in Chicago's history is about to become a topic taught to public school students.
The Associated Press, September 5, 2017
1 min read
College & Workforce Readiness News in Brief N.C. College Opens High School on Campus for Aspiring Teachers
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte has launched an on-campus high school for aspiring teachers. The new high school, located in the same building as the education school, is the result of a partnership between the university's Cato College of Education and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system.
Brenda Iasevoli, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Law & Courts News in Brief Wis. District Asks High Court to Resolve Transgender Students' Restroom Use
A Wisconsin school district is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether school policies that require transgender students to use restrooms corresponding to their biological sex violate Title IX or the U.S. Constitution.
Mark Walsh, September 5, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief Videos Show Cheerleaders Forced Into Splits in Denver
Cheerleading coaches and school administrators in a Colorado district were placed on leave, and police opened an investigation amid a series of videos showing high school cheerleaders screaming in pain while being pushed into splits during practice.
The Associated Press, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Assessment News in Brief Pitch to Scale Back Collection of AP Data Raises Eyebrows
The U.S. Department of Education is weighing changes to its signature Civil Rights Data Collection for the coming school year, including asking districts for new information on computer science and internet connectivity, while scaling back requirements for collecting Advanced Placement test data.
Alyson Klein, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Christopher Ruszkowski
Christopher Ruszkowski
Education News in Brief Transition
New Mexico's acting secretary of education has been named secretary-designate of the post.
September 5, 2017
1 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup Dual-Enrollment
Dual-enrollment courses have become a popular way for states to boost college access for traditionally underserved students.
Catherine Gewertz, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity Report Roundup Career Education
Mentoring young men of color using professional work experience can significantly boost their likelihood of graduating from high school and going on to college.
Sarah D. Sparks, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Early Childhood Report Roundup Early-Childhood Education
Half of Americans in 22 states live in "child-care deserts"—places where there are more than three children for every child-care slot—according to a new geographic analysis by the Center on American Progress, a liberal think tank.
Sarah D. Sparks, September 5, 2017
1 min read
Special Education Report Roundup Special Education
Black and Hispanic children, as well as children of other minority races, are enrolled in special education at rates significantly lower than those of their white peers.
Christina A. Samuels, September 5, 2017
1 min read
School Improvement Hinges on Access to Student Data The threat of litigation could motivate state officials to work with education researchers, write two law professors.
Jon Krause
Data Commentary School Improvement Hinges on Access to Student Data
The threat of litigation could motivate state officials to work with education researchers, write two law professors.
Chris Elmendorf & Darien Shanske, September 1, 2017
5 min read