April 20, 2016

Education Week, Vol. 35, Issue 28
Special Education Number of U.S. Students in Special Education Ticks Upward
After years of steady decline, the number of school-age students covered under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act has swung upward since the 2011-12 school year, an Education Week analysis shows.
Christina A. Samuels, April 19, 2016
8 min read
Special Education Chart: U.S. Special Education Enrollment
In this graphic, see how the number of U.S. students enrolled in special education has changed over the past 20 years.
April 19, 2016
J’Remi Barnes, a first-generation college student from New Orleans, walks across campus at Grinnell College in Iowa. He graduated from a charter school that helps prepare students for college. Education Week profiled Barnes, also seen at top left in New Orleans, last year.
J’Remi Barnes, a first-generation college student from New Orleans, walks across campus at Grinnell College in Iowa. He graduated from a charter school that helps prepare students for college. Education Week profiled Barnes, also seen at top left in New Orleans, last year.
Ryan Donnell for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Some Charters Help Alumni Stick With College
Efforts to increase college persistence, especially for low-income, first-generation students, are catching on in some charter schools.
Arianna Prothero, April 19, 2016
7 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act Sparks Fly as Congress Reviews ESSA Rulemaking Process
The Education Department and some in Congress appear on a collision course over how the Every Student Succeeds Act handles federal spending on students from low-income backgrounds.
Andrew Ujifusa, April 19, 2016
5 min read
State Rep. James Beverly, right, a Democrat, talks with Rep. Ed Rynders, a Republican colleague, on the first day of the 2016 Georgia legislative session in January. Lawmakers this session passed legislation to limit time spent on standardized testing.
State Rep. James Beverly, right, a Democrat, talks with Rep. Ed Rynders, a Republican colleague, on the first day of the 2016 Georgia legislative session in January. Lawmakers this session passed legislation to limit time spent on standardized testing.
David Goldman/AP-File
Every Student Succeeds Act Testing Proves Volatile Part of State Legislative Mix
With the 2016 state legislative season nearing its halfway point, testing and related issues fuel legislative debate, as well as tensions between lawmakers and state education officials.
Daarel Burnette II, April 19, 2016
6 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act New Online Tool Expands Access to School Climate Measurements
Tracking factors like how students feel about their safety and well-being in school has been off limits to some districts. A new tool from the U.S. Department of Education will make measuring school climate widely accessible.
Evie Blad, April 19, 2016
5 min read
School & District Management How Students' Emotions Affect Their Schooling
Helping students rethink the emotions they feel during stressful transitions can make a big difference, new research has found.
Sarah D. Sparks & Debra Viadero, April 19, 2016
4 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Ind. Scholarship Law Aims to Entice Top Students Into Teaching
Indiana has become the latest state to seek to curb persistent teacher shortages by offering college-tuition dollars to students who go into teaching.
Elisha McNeil, April 19, 2016
4 min read
School & District Management Digital Divide Evolves in Fla. Schools, Study Finds
Researchers at the recent American Educational Research Association summit discussed findings on socioeconomic disparities in how K-12 technology is used, and ed-tech's potential as a tool for social justice.
Benjamin Herold, April 19, 2016
6 min read
Abdullah Haseeb, 4, works with “circuit blocks” last year in the MakeShop at the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum. The blocks are the result of a collaboration between a local teacher, a resident artist, and a robotics lab at Carnegie Mellon University.
Abdullah Haseeb, 4, works with “circuit blocks” last year in the MakeShop at the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum. The blocks are the result of a collaboration between a local teacher, a resident artist, and a robotics lab at Carnegie Mellon University.
Jeff Swenson for Education Week-File
School & District Management Researchers Probe Equity, Design Principles in Maker Ed.
Encouraging students to draw not just on their own internal skills and experiences, but also assets from individuals and community is a key to successful "maker" education, research suggests.
Benjamin Herold, April 19, 2016
7 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
College & Workforce Readiness Commentary Getting Serious About College and Career Readiness
With the passage of ESSA, states must build on the college- and career-readiness progress of the past decade, writes Matt Gandal.
Matt Gandal, April 19, 2016
5 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
Law & Courts Commentary Teaching Evolution Isn't About Changing Beliefs
Students can learn subject matter that might conflict with their religion without it compromising their beliefs, write professors Adam Laats and Harvey Siegel.
Adam Laats & Harvey Siegel, April 19, 2016
4 min read
School Climate & Safety Letter to the Editor Schools Lack Opportunities for the Learning of the True Importance of Citizenship
To the Editor:
Commentary author Arnold Packer is well meaning, and some of his recent suggestions on citizenship and education are worthwhile ("Should Citizenship Be a Goal of Education?"). However, in my opinion, he still overlooks the most obvious missing element.
April 19, 2016
1 min read
Families & the Community Letter to the Editor Students and Administrators Could Increase Parent Involvement by Working Together
To the Editor:
I write in regard to the recent article "ESSA May Offer Megaphone for Parent, Community Voice." Too often, parental involvement is just a facade, giving the false impression of full engagement. Examples of this include parent councils that are used to "speak for" parents, or in some cases, school councils that are reserved for parents. The reality is that such councils cannot represent every parent because, like students, all parents are different. And each will have a different opinion.
April 19, 2016
1 min read
School & District Management Letter to the Editor Principals Tackle Herculean Tasks Every Day. Their Jobs Must Become More Manageable
To the Editor:
Psychologist and school consultant Robert Evans, in his March 30, 2016 Commentary "Principals, Get Your Irish On," was right on target when he wrote that "if we truly wanted to attract, retain, and support the best and brightest principals, we would focus on making their jobs more doable."
April 19, 2016
1 min read
Teaching Profession Letter to the Editor Reader Questions Usefulness of Sharing Classroom's Political Conversations
To the Editor:
The March 31, 2016, Education Week Teacher e-newsletter highlighted an opinion blog post on Donald Trump, which had no place in this professional publication ("The Challenges of Teaching Civics in the Age of Trump").
April 19, 2016
1 min read
Education Correction Correction
An article in the April 13, 2016, issue of Education Week mischaracterized the end of the Pearson testing company's contract as the administrator of New York state's standardized tests.
April 19, 2016
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief University Math Workshop For Would-Be Teachers Flops
A University of Arizona effort to encourage high school seniors to become math teachers has fallen flat because teachers are reluctant to recommend their own career.
The Associated Press, April 19, 2016
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Officer Who Body-Slammed Student Fired in San Antonio
The San Antonio district has fired Joshua Kehm, a school resource officer seen body-slamming a 12-year-old girl face first on the ground in a video that spread online.
Evie Blad, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Phila. Teacher Vacancies Spur Summer Classes
With little more than two months remaining in the academic year, 139 teacher vacancies—out of 8,443 positions—remain open across Philadelphia schools, resulting in thousands of students' being taught by uncertified teachers.
Tribune News Service, April 19, 2016
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief New Miss. Law Eliminates Election of School Chiefs
Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant last week signed into law a bill that changes all public school superintendents to appointees.
The Associated Press, April 19, 2016
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief N.H. Court Backs Counselor On Abortion Advice
New Hampshire's highest court has ruled that a district must reinstate a high school guidance counselor whose contract was not renewed after she clashed with her principal about how to handle a student's desire to terminate her pregnancy.
Mark Walsh, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief In Lawsuit, Detroit Blames State for Financial Woes
The Detroit school board has filed a federal lawsuit against Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, alleging that his state-appointed emergency managers have failed to adequately address the district's financial troubles, crumbling school buildings, and academic deficiencies.
Corey Mitchell, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief L.A. District Must Pay $7.1 Million to Charter
The Los Angeles Unified School District must pay $7.1 million to a San Fernando Valley charter school for failing to provide it with rent-free classroom space.
Tribune News Service, April 19, 2016
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief Delaware Lawmakers Eye All-Mail School Elections
State lawmakers are considering a bill mandating that all school elections in Delaware be done by mail.
The Associated Press, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Max Eden
Max Eden
Education News in Brief Transitions
Max Eden, formerly the education policy program manager at the American Enterprise Institute, has become a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute.
April 19, 2016
1 min read
Families & the Community News in Brief Black, Latino Parents Vexed About School Expectations
A majority of African-American and Latino parents report that they want higher expectations for their children and better teachers in public schools, where they believe there are racial inequalities and funding disparities, according to a national poll released last week by the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a national coalition of 200 organizations.
Sarah Tully, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Vergara Ruling Overturned By Calif. Appeals Court
A California appeals court last week reversed a trial court's 2014 ruling in the landmark case Vergara v. California that the state's job-protection laws for teachers had produced unconstitutional inequities in the education of poor and minority students.
Emmanuel Felton, April 19, 2016
1 min read
Families & the Community Report Roundup Study: Math Gains Found From 'Ready To Learn'
The multiplatform games, projects, and apps created through the grant program boosted young children's math skills, an evaluation has found.
Sarah D. Sparks, April 19, 2016
1 min read