Redefining Opportunity and Advantage in Education


An Education Week Opinion Collection


Facebook Twitter Addthis

There has been a groundswell of interest in the field lately in understanding racial disparities in learning outcomes not as an “achievement gap” but as an “opportunity gap.” Why? And what does that distinction really mean?


In this special Opinion collection, researchers and educators explore how even subtle language distinctions can reflect and inform how we think about student potential. Original research from the Education Week Research Center rounds out this project with a nationally representative survey on teachers’ attitudes, perceptions, and language choices surrounding disparities in student outcomes.







Does ‘the Achievement Gap’ Evoke a Negative Stereotype? What the Research Says
OPINION

Does ‘the Achievement Gap’ Evoke a Negative Stereotype? What the Research Says

December 5, 2019

What we call education inequality defines how—and even if—we solve it, write three researchers.








Only 3 States Expect Teachers to Learn About Institutional Bias. That’s a Big Problem
OPINION

Only 3 States Expect Teachers to Learn About Institutional Bias. That’s a Big Problem

December 5, 2019

Students of color don’t need to get “grittier,” writes New America’s Jenny Muñiz. They need us to fix institutional racism.









The Dangerous Narrative That Lurks Under the ‘Achievement Gap’
OPINION

The Dangerous Narrative That Lurks Under the ‘Achievement Gap’

December 5, 2019

Black students are not to blame for their lack of educational opportunities, argues assistant principal Eric Higgins.








I Study How Teachers Collaborate Online. Here’s How They Can Do It Better
OPINION

I Study How Teachers Collaborate Online. Here’s How They Can Do It Better

December 5, 2019

Researcher Robin Anderson shares what happened when one online community of teachers tried to unlearn their deficit mindsets together.








DATA

How Teachers Talk About Educational Disparities

December 5, 2019

In a national survey, we dug into how teachers use language to make sense of disparities in student outcomes by race and income level.