Classroom Technology Online Summit

Technology & Schools: Coronavirus, Remote Learning, and Beyond

This event occurred on June 11, 2020 3:00 PM EDT and is only accessible to those who originally registered.
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On Thursday, June 11, 2020, Education Week will be hosting an online summit to examine how the massive school closures caused by the coronavirus and the rapid transition to remote learning across the country is re-shaping the role and use of technology in schools now and for years to come. During this virtual event, Education Week writers and editors and their expert guests will staff “discussion rooms” that tackle a set of issues that are very much top-of-mind for teachers, principals, and district leaders, who are arguably working under the most difficult circumstances ever.

Education Week’s newsroom offers you an opportunity to ask tough questions and better understand the educational technology challenges facing schools as they struggle to figure out what the next steps are for the K-12 system. In this Online Summit, Education Week journalists and their guests will be fielding your questions and guiding the conversations in discussion rooms on a host of topics, including:

• How the nationwide move to remote learning is expanding significantly the percentage of schools with 1-to-1 computing opportunities for students, and what that means for teaching and learning.
• What educators need to do to bridge tech equity gaps, which the coronavirus school closures revealed as schools moved learning from their buildings to students’ homes.
• How the scramble to put together remote learning programs was messy and frustrating but led to teachers developing valuable virtual teaching skills.
• Why the massive move to remote learning raised already heightened concerns about students spending too much time in front of computer screens.
• What technology steps schools need to take now to get ready for next year, whether school buildings are reopened or remote learning continues into the 2020-21 academic year.
• The lessons learned during this massive remote learning experiment about what might work better in training teachers how to use technology more effectively to improve student learning?

Agenda

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET | Discussions Open
1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Teaching and learning in the new ed-tech landscape. Big disruption or business as usual?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

The big tech equity challenges schools are up against. Can they fix them?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

The rising value (or not) of virtual teaching skills.

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Too much screen time. Should we be worried?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

What technology steps schools need to take now to get ready for next year.

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Teachers, technology, and professional development. What’s missing?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Building Confidence in Remote Teaching and Learning

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

How Educators Can Create Meaningful Learning Experiences Online—Now and in the Future

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

How to Successfully Implement At-Home Learning: One District’s Story

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Bring SEL Home: Experts Share Tips and Resources to Use In Class—and Beyond

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Mind the Gaps: How to Identify Where Students Are and How to Support Their Learning Needs

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Taking Learning Online: Exploring Your Experiences and Insights

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Digital Curriculum in the New Era of Distance Learning: What Really Matters?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

How Can School Districts Support and Secure Their Investments in Remote Learning Devices?

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Find Success in Online K-12 Learning

1:00–3:00 p.m. ET

Homeroom to Home: Blended Learning Tools and Techniques to Build Instructional Resilience in 2020-21

Speakers
Brandi Argentar
Science Teacher and Technology Coach Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, Ill.
Amy Campbell
2019-2020 Washington State Teacher of the Year, and Special Education Teacher Helen Baller Elementary School, Camas, Wash.
Betty Chandy
Director for Online Learning Catalyst@Penn GSE, a center for educational innovation, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education
Richard E. Ferdig
Summit Professor of Learning Technologies and Professor of Instructional Technology Kent State University
Mike Flynn
Director Mathematics Leadership Programs, Mount Holyoke College
Melinda George
Chief Policy Officer Learning Forward
Laura Haddad
English Teacher and Technology Coach Glastonbury High School, Glastonbury, Conn.
Keith R. Krueger
CEO Consortium for School Networking (CoSN)
Steven Langford
Chief Information Officer Beaverton School District, Beaverton, Ore.
Sarah Porisch
Director of Technology Brainerd Public Schools, Brainerd, Minn.
Mark Racine
Chief Information Officer Boston Public Schools
Jenny Radesky
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Medical School, Department of Pediatrics Division of Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Michigan
Antonio Romayor
Chief Technology Officer El Centro Elementary School District, El Centro, Calif.
Tom Ryan
Chief Information and Strategy Officer Santa Fe Public School District, Santa Fe, N.M.
Patti Salzmann
Chief Academic Officer, Division of Academics and School Leadership San Antonio Independent School District
Lisa Spencer
Executive Director, Instructional Technology & Support Prince George's County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro, Md.
GG Weisenfeld
Assistant Research Professor National Institute for Early Education Research, Rutgers University, Graduate School of Education
Moderators
Kevin Bushweller oversees coverage of educational technology and learning environments for Education Week.
Sean Cavanagh is the managing editor of EdWeek Market Brief.
Mark Lieberman is a reporter for Education Week covering technology and online learning.
David Saleh Rauf is a contributing writer for EdWeek Market Brief.
Sarah Schwartz is a reporter for Education Week who covers curriculum and instruction.
Sarah D. Sparks covers education research, data, and the science of learning for Education Week.
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Education Week can provide 1 hour of Professional Development credit for online summits if the educator attends live. A Certificate of Completion will be emailed to you shortly after the summit has ended. On demand viewing of a summit cannot be used for credit. As with all professional development hours delivered, Education Week recommends each educator verify ahead of the online summit that the content will qualify for professional development in your school, district, county, or state with your supervisor, human resources professional, and/or principal or superintendent’s office.