Education

Overheard

January 01, 2002 1 min read
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“The average high school sophomore or junior was born in 1985 or 1986. They have no working memory of President Reagan. The Gulf War happened when they were in preschool. A lot of the things we adults assume knowledge of is completely foreign to them.”

—David Goddy, editor in chief of Scholastic News and the New York Times Upfront, on why his current-events magazines for students have included Middle East history in their coverage of the terrorist threat in America.


“We’ve got teachers who expect the money, and we don’t have the money to give them.”

—Jim Causby, superintendent of North Carolina’s Johnston County Schools, on the shrinking school-supply stipends that Governor Michael Easley promised teachers late last year. In his education budget, Easley included $200 per teacher for purchasing classroom supplies, but the legislature appropriated less than $50 each.


“It would be really nice if I could get an apple.”

—Tamara Garfield, a student member of an education advisory council to the mayor in Phoenix, at a recent meeting on improving area schools. The high schooler’s suggestion: Offer more healthful cafeteria food.


“I think music and the arts should be considered core subjects in our nation’s schools. There is absolutely no conflict between the expansion of our fine arts programs, our music programs, and focus on other academic programs.”

—U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige in an interview on the music television channel VH1.


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