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Education Opinion

Twice Exceptionality Survey

By Tamara Fisher — April 06, 2011 1 min read
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A couple years ago, I posted an interview here with a friend of mine who is twice exceptional. Twice exceptional (or “2e”), as I noted back then, is the term used for those individuals who have dual (or even multiple) exceptionalities. They are both gifted “and” - such as gifted and learning disabled, gifted and bipolar, gifted and physically disabled, gifted and ADHD, etc. This dichotomy of polar exceptionalities can be incredibly frustrating for the individual (and their families and teachers), somewhat akin to being the rope in a tug-of-war - being pulled in one direction by their gifts and talents and the intense desire to pursue them, while also being pulled in another direction by some sort of physical, intellectual, psychological, or emotional challenge that can complicate (or even get in the way of) their ability to develop and fulfill their giftedness.

The Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at the University of Iowa College of Education is in the process of establishing the National Institute for Twice-Exceptionality (NITE). According to their website, this Institute will be “a national resource for gifted students who have one or more disabilities (twice-exceptional) as well as a training center for parents, educators, counselors, and psychologists.”

As a beginning step in the process of establishing this center, they are conducting a survey to gather data on the state of twice-exceptionality from the perspective of educators and educational administrators. They want a better understanding of what your understanding of twice-exceptionality is (or is not). At this point, the survey is for educators and administrators, not parents, however it sounds like plans for a similar survey aimed at parents might be in the works.

To complete the survey, visit this link, or click the link on the NITE homepage. It only takes a few minutes. The survey will close in mid-May. Feel free to pass the survey on to other educators (regular classroom, special education, gifted education, administration), even those who may have little or no knowledge on the topic. Anyone with questions regarding this survey can contact Megan Foley Nicpon at the Belin-Blank Center.

Thank you for taking a few moments to assist in this important endeavor!

The opinions expressed in Unwrapping the Gifted are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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