Opinion Blog

Classroom Q&A

With Larry Ferlazzo

In this EdWeek blog, an experiment in knowledge-gathering, Ferlazzo will address readers’ questions on classroom management, ELL instruction, lesson planning, and other issues facing teachers. Send your questions to lferlazzo@epe.org. Read more from this blog.

Education Opinion

Q&A Collections: Entering the Teaching Profession

By Larry Ferlazzo — August 16, 2020 2 min read
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During the summer, I will be sharing thematic posts bringing together responses on similar topics from the past nine years. You can see all those collections from the first eight years here.

Here are the ones I’ve posted so far:

This Year’s Most Popular Q&A Posts

Race & Racism in Schools

School Closures & the Coronavirus Crisis

Classroom-Management Advice

Best Ways to Begin the School Year

Best Ways to End the School Year

Student Motivation & Social-Emotional Learning

Implementing the Common Core

Facing Gender Challenges in Education

Teaching Social Studies.

Cooperative & Collaborative Learning

Using Tech in the Classroom

Student Voices

Parent Engagment In Schools

Teaching English-Language Learners

Reading Instruction

Writing Instruction

Education Policy Issues

Assessment

Differentiating Instruction

Math Instruction

Science Instruction

Advice for New Teachers

Author Interviews

Today’s theme is on Entering the Teaching Profession. You can see the list following this excerpt from one of the posts:

* Advice on Getting Your First Teaching Job

Alex Kajitani, Brianna Burnette, Dawn Mitchell, Tina H. Boogren, Ann Traynor, Carol Pelletier Radford, Ron Nash, and Melissa Jackson contribute their ideas on how to get a new teaching job.

* ‘Be Authentic’ in Teacher Job Interviews

Dr. Beth Gotcher, Jen Schwanke, Tamera Musiowsky, Richard Gerver, Otis Kriegel, Elaine Miles, and Cindy Terebush share their job-search suggestions for new teachers.

* ‘Tips to Land Your First Teaching Job’

Marquitta Mitchell, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Susan Lafond, Julia Thompson, Joe Mullikin, and Sean Ruday offer ideas on how people can obtain their first teaching job.

*‘Applying for a Teaching Position Is a Job in Itself’

Valerie Ruckes, Sanée Bell, Dr. PJ Caposey, Candace Hines, Mary Cathryn D. Ricker, and Rinard Pugh share recommendations on how to get your first teaching job.

* Advice on Making a Midcareer Change to Teaching

Gladis Kersaint, Denisse R. Thompson, Jeri Asaro, Val Brown, Pia Wong, Megan Allen, and Anne Jenks share their advice with those considering a midcareer change into the teaching profession.

* Career-Changers Are ‘Attractive Teaching Candidates’

Dr. Jenny Grant Rankin, Marcy Webb, Otis Kriegel, Peter P. Leibman, and Karla St. John contribute their thoughts on people considering making a midcareer change into the teaching profession. I’ve also included several comments from readers.

* Seven Strategies for Working With Student-Teachers

This final post in the series features what I think is a particularly interesting combination—a guest response from Ted Appel, the principal of the inner-city school where I teach, who describes the innovative requirements he insisted upon if a university was interested in placing student-teachers with us; followed by a commentary from Pia Lindquist Wong, director of a university teaching- credentials program, who found that her ideas dovetailed with those of Ted’s. The two then developed a partnership.

* Student-Teachers ‘Should Be Colleagues’

Emily Geltz, Linda Rief, Carol Ann Tomlinson, Jessica Bennett, and Jane Fung contribute to this post.

* Letting Student-Teachers ‘Sink or Swim’ Is ‘Not Permissible’

Michael Opitz and Michael Ford; PJ Caposey; Patty O’Grady; and Sally Zepeda all share their advice for student-teachers and their supervisors.

* What Principals Look for in a Prospective Teacher

High school Principal Eric Sheninger, middle school Principal Pete Hall, and Superintendent Pamela Moran share their advice.

The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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