Opinion
Education Opinion

Moving to Middle

By Hanne Denney — June 28, 2007 1 min read

So I am moving to Southern Middle School, beginning a new chapter in my educational career. I have to laugh at that line, because “new chapter” sounds profound, but I think educators make changes in their careers more frequently now. Gone are the days when a teacher began and finished his/her career in one school, or even in one grade or program. Now I hear about teachers changing grade levels, changing content areas, going from special education to general and back again, or moving into administration and back to teaching. I think change is a good thing, because it keeps teachers fresh and professionally stimulated. If our minds are not engaged with new learning and experience, how can we engage our students’ minds?

So now my blog has to move on, to new topics and purposes. I want to continue to write and to hear from readers. As a career changer, older teacher, I know the value of shared experience.

So I am going to start writing as “In the Middle”, and look at issues of middle school instruction. I assume its a different ballgame from the high school issues I’m used to. I assume it’s different from the preschool concerns I used to face. I don’t know enough about elementary education to comment about those differences.

I don’t know much about middle school education, grades 6-8. I’m excited about this new venture, and I am beginning a self-directed learning program to increase my educator’s expertise.

I’m also moving into a leadership role as department chairperson for Special Education, while teaching two classes. So I’ll also be “in the middle” as I find my way between the school administration and the faculty.

In this blog I will communicate my new pedagogical thoughts, my lesson planning, and my experiences moving to a new school and grade level, and serving as a department chairperson. I hope you’ll share your responses with me.

The opinions expressed in Ready or Not are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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