Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education

Georgia Governor Pledges Continued Focus on Struggling Schools

By Denisa R. Superville — November 11, 2016 1 min read

What happens now that Georgia voters have resoundingly rejected Governor Nathan Deal’s school takeover plan?

Deal is not giving up, reports the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

According to the paper, the governor plans to continue to push for improvements in chronically low-performing schools, though he didn’t say what steps he plans to take.

Deal’s signature education proposal to create a statewide district that would take over low-performing schools was defeated by a vote of 60-40 on Tuesday, according to unofficial results from the Georgia secretary of state’s office. The ballot question would have changed the Georgia constitution to allow officials to create the district.

“It was not my failure,” the paper quoted Deal as saying about the ballot question’s defeat. “The failure of this passing is impacting on those 68,000 children who are still stuck in chronically failing schools. We’re going to see what the local jurisdictions are willing to do about that. The ball is totally in their court right now.”

The onus will now be on school districts, many of which adopted resolutions opposing the proposed statewide district, to show they can improve those chronically low-performing schools, Deal said.

The new district would have consisted of schools that received F grades for three years under the state’s school accountability system.

A superintendent, appointed by the governor, would have been in charge of selecting the schools to include in the district. The law allowed the superintendent to pick up to 20 eligible schools annually.

The superintendent would have had the option to close schools, turn them into charters, or work with districts to improve them.

A coalition of political and education groups—including teachers’ unions—opposed the measure and spent about $5 million to defeat it, according to the AJC.

School districts and other opponents had railed against the possible loss of local control and tax dollars they said would have resulted from the creation of the new district.

The governor and his allies had argued that the proposal, which was based on Tennessee’s Achievement District and Louisiana’s Recovery School District, was an effort to provide better school options for about 68,000 students.

A version of this news article first appeared in the District Dossier blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Special Education Teachers
Lancaster, PA, US
Lancaster Lebanon IU 13
Speech Therapists
Lancaster, PA, US
Lancaster Lebanon IU 13
BASE Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read