October 22, 2008

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Vol. 28, Issue 09
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State officials see the new endorsement as a way to ensure that teachers are qualified to cover the math content as more students enroll in Algebra 1 in 8th grade, rather than waiting until high school.
As states’ information-collection systems grow more sophisticated, officials are grappling with where to draw the line on how “value added” data on teachers can be used.
The new class of governors and state legislators to be elected Nov. 4 will inherit financial problems that threaten existing education programs and limit possible new initiatives.
With the presidential candidates both underscoring their support for entrepreneurial initiatives in education, policy experts are advancing ideas for helping such efforts flourish.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
The Broad Foundation honors the district as the nation’s 'best-kept secret' for the achievements of its overwhelmingly poor student population.
Sports
The crisis besetting U.S. and world financial markets is hitting school districts hard, as they struggle to float the bonds needed for capital projects, borrow money to ensure cash flow, and get access to investment funds locked up in troubled institutions.
The courts play a big part in many aspects of public education in the United States, but it wasn’t always that way, according to experts at a conference held last week.
New research finds that many countries consistently produce a higher percentage of girls with elite math skills than the United States does, which it attributes to a tendency in American society to discourage girls from pursuing those studies.
Checklist of questions helps test creators avoid needless confusion for students with disabilities.
University of Louisville researchers are exploring how print textbooks can be converted to digital versions to help students with “print disabilities,” a term for various learning, visual, and physical issues that interfere with reading.
Teachers’ access to student information has increased, but many lack the training and some necessary tools to support the kind of data-driven decisionmaking that leads to instructional change and improved achievement, a report says.
States are struggling—and sometimes failing—to hold the line on education budget cuts and day-to-day disruption in the face of budget deficits, flagging tax revenues, and credit jitters that threaten their cash flow.
State Journal
After complaints from the states, federal officials offer more flexible guidelines on a section of the NCLB Act applying to English-language learners.
The Oct. 15 event gave school issues their highest profile yet in the the presidential campaign, as the candidates had their first and probably only chance for a face-to-face exchange over education.
Federal File
Campaign Notebook
High court to decide issue of liability for lawsuits that is of interest to educators.
Education will be on the ballot Nov. 4, even if the subject hasn’t been on voters’ minds much during the 2008 campaign season.
Teacher Adam Berlin says schools do great harm to young people by not requiring them to earn middle school graduation.
"Funding parity for high-performing charter schools should be a priority for policymakers at every level," writes John H. Scully.
"By not paying upfront for meaningful and fair teacher evaluation, we pay later in costs to the profession," writes Julie Sweetland.
Letters
"Paying too much attention to short-run change dulls the ability to see longer-range transformation," writes Charles Taylor Kerchner.
Special Notice To Our Print Subscribers
Education Week has received reports of subscribers receiving repeated telemarketing calls to renew subscriptions. Please know that Education Week does not solicit renewals via the telephone, nor do we authorize any agents to do so. If you receive such a call, DO NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH ANY PERSONAL INFORMATION. Report the call to Education Week at telemarketing@epe.org. Provide as much detail about the call as you can, such as the phone number of the caller, name of the company, date and time of day of the call. Thank you for your help.

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