August 29, 2007

This Issue
Vol. 27, Issue 1
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Photo Gallery
Photo Gallery
Photo Gallery: An Anchor In a Shifting Stream
To combat the problem of dropouts, the school district has launched a full-on campaign to get its rising freshmen into high school and keep them there.
Since 2002, the New Teacher Project has been finding at least 10 applicants for each teaching job it fills for the once hard-to-staff Baltimore district.
Continuing a 10-year trend, U.S. public schools as a whole plan to welcome 49.6 million pre-K-12 students this fall, a projected rise of 1 million from the 2005-06 school year.
News in Brief: A National Roundup
Report Roundup
News in Brief: A National Roundup
Report Roundup
Obituary
Report Roundup
Correction
A Los Angeles school with a reputation for violence is embroiled in another type of controversy—this time involving some of its teachers and highest-achieving students.
The analysis of beginning-reading programs by the What Works Clearinghouse may not help school leaders.
The Reading First Advisory Committee has asked for more time and technical assistance in evaluating the data from the $1 billion-a-year program.
More Americans say they are knowledgeable about the No Child Left Behind Act, but familiarity appears to breed dislike.
Charter Schools
The National Charter School Research Project has spent three years trying to bring a neutral perspective to the contentious charter school debate.
A program to help middle school students quickly digest new algebra concepts will be piloted in the Southwest.
School leaders are planning to serve 111,000 students—a drop of 5,000 from last year.
State Journal
The district is being accused of failing to include all the required data on student achievement and school financial data on report cards.
California’s experience shows hurdles states may confront when moving to implement popular, ambitious programs.
Federal File
Business leaders are turning their attention to the 2008 presidential race and urging candidates in both parties to make prosperity through education a core piece of their platforms.
The U.S. Dept. of Ed. is being sued for allowing alternative-route teachers who are not yet certified to be designated as “highly qualified” under NCLB.
The changing face of America's migrant-student population means lower enrollment for a popular program—and new questions as Congrss weighs its renewal.
Will their rhetoric yield sound ideas for improving Washington’s role in school reform?, Bruce Fuller asks.
The high court ruling gives schools a Pyrrhic victory—and little practical guidance, Alex Kreit writes.
Letters
Letters
Jonathan Kozol writes about why new recruits leave inner-city classrooms—and what it will take to keep them there.

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