Policing America’s Schools

An Education Week Analysis

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Debate is roiling over the role of police officers in schools. How much do they protect? How much do they contribute to the so-called school-to-prison pipeline? Should they be in schools at all? Education Week reporters and research analysts dug into the latest federal civil rights data to see who is most likely to be arrested at school and which students are most likely to go to schools with cops. We profile two districts—St. Paul, Minn., and Atlanta—trying, and struggling, to balance safety with a positive school climate.



INTERACTIVE Which Students Are Arrested the Most at School?

Explore how student arrest rates and referrals to law enforcement compare at the national, state, and local levels. View Your School >

Which Students Are Arrested the Most at School?





Black Students More Likely to Be Arrested at School

Black Students More Likely to Be Arrested at School

In 43 states and the District of Columbia, black students are arrested at school at disproportionately high levels, an Education Week Research Center analysis finds. One reason may be that African-American students are more likely than any other students to be in schools with police.

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A Fight to Build Trust With School Police

A Fight to Build Trust With School Police

A series of violent incidents in the city’s schools—including contentious encounters involving police—have eroded trust and divided some students, teachers, and administrators, making the district's efforts to revamp school security challenging.

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Atlanta Schools Start Over With Police

Atlanta Schools Start Over With Police

The school district is building its own police department from scratch, putting officers through specialized training on how to build positive relationships with students and work in school settings. Read More >








Education Week’s data-driven journalism projects are supported in part by a grant from the Schott Foundation for Public Education, at schottfoundation.org. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.




Contributors

Laura Baker, Creative Director
Sumi Bannerjee, Web Designer
Evie Blad, Staff Writer
Mark Bomster, Assistant Managing Editor
Charles Borst, Director of Photography
Daarel Burnette II, Staff Writer
Kavitha Cardoza, Video Correspondent
Gregory Chronister, Executive Editor
Stacey Decker, Online News Editor
Coral Flanagan, Research Intern
Alex Harwin, Research Analyst
Hyon-Young Kim, Web Producer
Kathryn Kross, Managing Producer
Sterling Lloyd, Assistant Director of Education Week Research Center
Kathleen Kennedy Manzo, Managing Editor
Lesli A. Maxwell, Assistant Managing Editor
Swikar Patel, Associate Director of Photography
Juan Thommasie, Data Visualization Consultant
Holly Yettick, Director of Education Week Research Center

Vol. 36, Issue 19