Published Online: September 12, 2006
Published in Print: September 13, 2006, as Principals Get New Presence in Blogosphere

Leading Indicators

Principals Get New Presence in Blogosphere

The National Association of Secondary School Principals has launched a blog to inform school leaders of federal education policy and enlist them in shaping that world.

“We’re hoping this will help principals promote the types of decisions they would like to see legislators make,” said Steve DeWitt, the Reston, Va.-based group’s director of government and public relations.

Bob Farrace, who oversees the NASSP’s print and online publications, said the Web log began over the summer as a way to transmit and update policy-oriented news affecting secondary schools.

Recent posts summarized a government report about the role of principals in administering tutoring under the No Child Left Behind Act, and reported that a Maryland gubernatorial candidate had proposed hefty bonuses for principals who work in low-performing schools.

The organization envisions the blog, at www.principalspolicyblog.org/blog/, as working in tandem with its Web site and its online Legislative Action Center to facilitate advocacy.


Breaking developments in law and policy will be carried on the blog, with analysis and other types of education news on the Web site, and links to lawmakers will be available through the action center, Mr. Farrace said.

Unlike some Washington blogs that have become famous for their lively debates, the principals’ blog remains quiet, with few responses to the staff postings.

But that doesn’t worry Mr. Farrace. He said any comments are welcome, but the blog’s chief aim is to inform and mobilize principals.

The organization also isn’t sure yet how many people read the blog, which is hosted by Yahoo for a charge to the NASSP of less than $10 a month.

The National Association of Elementary School Principals plans to start a blog this fall. It will not focus on federal policy issues, but on providing a forum for elementary and middle school principals to discuss the field and their practice, said NAESP spokeswoman Raven Padgett.

Vol. 26, Issue 03, Page 10

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented