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Preschool Planning

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The New York state board of regents is recommending 12 components for its early-childhood education policy for children from birth through grade 3.

    • Services for children with special needs, from birth through age 2, using through "expanded and consistent" outreach from school districts and from health officials.

    • Statewide prekindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds in all school districts.

    • A lowering of the compulsory school age from 6 to 5.

    • A requirement that all school districts to provide full-day kindergarten.

    • Stronger connections in curriculum between prekindergarten and the primary grades.

    • Integrated classrooms for young children with disabilities.

    • Partnerships with family members that include information in native languages, parent training, and family-literacy programs.

    • Greater collaboration between agencies working to help on from birth to age 8.

    • Better alignment between pre-K and K-12 standards, curriculum, assessment, and data reporting, including expansion of the student tracking system to include 3- and 4-year-olds.

    • Improvement of professional development and preservice education programs to make sure teachers are knowledgeable about recent research and how it translates into instructional practice.

    • Use of the New York state university system as a resource to address academic-achievement gaps through public television, library materials, museums, and other programs.

    • Creation of a "stable approach" to funding by linking financing to the state aid formula.

SOURCE: New York State Board of Regents

Vol. 25, Issue 04

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