Published Online: May 14, 2003
Published in Print: May 14, 2003, as Retrospective

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20 YEARS AGO...May 18, 1983

  • Seventeen states have passed or are considering bills that would offer tuition subsidies or loans to college students to encourage them to become mathematics and science teachers. A telephone survey by Education Week shows an even greater number of proposals for the further training of math and science teachers now in the classroom.
  • In a ruling that could have national implications, a federal appeals court overturns a lower court's order requiring the Kalamazoo, Mich., school board to lay off senior white teachers in order to protect the jobs of black teachers. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit says the lower court "erred in imposing a quota system for the hiring and composition of the teaching staff."
  • The College Board recommends that all college-bound students demonstrate "basic learning" in six fields of study before they advance to higher education. The proposal from the sponsor of the SAT college-entrance exam comes on the heels of national reports urging educators to demand more of high school students.

10 YEARS AGO...MAY 19, 1993

  • One year after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Lee v. Wiesman, barring school-sponsored prayers at graduation ceremonies, communities are still confronting the divisive issue. But while there will be prayers at many graduation ceremonies this year, most will be delivered by young people wearing caps and gowns, not members of the clergy.
  • A large majority of public school teachers rank strengthening parent involvement in their children's education as the first or second most important policy goal, ahead of expanding early-childhood programs, establishing tough national standards for students, or improving safety in and around schools. The 1993 Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher polled a representative sample of 1,000 teachers nationwide.
  • Educators, foundation executives, and community activists from around the country gather in Philadelphia this month to celebrate the advantages of small high schools and discuss how to make them the norm, rather than the exception, in American education.

Vol. 22, Issue 36, Page 6

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