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A symbol (*) marks deadlines that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.

Nov. 10--Business education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Centers for International Business Education Program. The awards are distributed by the office of postsecondary education, with an estimated 50 awards ranging from $25,000 to $100,000 each. Contact: U.S.E.D., C.I.B.E. Program, 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 708-5366 or (800) 572-5580.

* Nov. 15.--Science: Papers are due for the "First Step" portion fo the Duracell/N.S.T.A. Scholarship Competition. Open to students in grades 9-12, this paper should be in the form of a concept for a battery operated device the student would like to actually build and enter in the formal competion. The outline should be between 100 and 150 words providing a general description of the device. Contact: Duracell/N.S.T.A. First Step, National Science Teachers Association, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 22201-3000.

* Nov. 18--Proposal request: The Massachusetts secretary of education, through the Executive Office of Education, is seeking proposals from qualified applicants to lead a major research project to assess the individual progress and effectiveness of the state's first charter schools. In addition, the researcher will be required to conduct a comparative study of the performance of charter schools relative to other public schools and the goals of the Education Reform Act of 1993. Contact: Emily Nielsen Jones, Policy Analyst, E.O.E., 1 Ashburton Pl., Room 1401, Boston, Mass. 12108; (617) 727-1313.

Nov. 21--Leadership: Entries are due for the Century III Leaders scholarship competition, sponsored by Sylvan Learning Centers and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (N.A.S.S.P.). Century III Leaders recognizes students who demonstrate outstanding school and community service and leadership, scholarship, and knowledge of current events. High school seniors and juniors are eligible to compete for a total of $150,000 in scholarship awards. Students should contact their school principal or guidance counselor to apply. Contact: National Association of Secondary School Principals, 1904 Association Dr., Reston, Va. 22091; fax: (703) 476-5432.

Nov. 28--Continuing educaton: The U.S. Department of Education is inviting applications for new awards under its Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program. The awards are intended for eligible students selected on the basis of demonstrated achievement and exceptional promise to undertake graduate study leading to a doctoral degree or Master of Fine Arts. An estimated 80-100 awards of about $23,000 will be available to eligible applicants. Contact: Audrey M. Smith, Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Portals C80 Washington, D.C. 20202-5329. (202) 260-3574. TDD: (800) 877-8339.

Dec. 1--Student competition: Entries are due for the Westinghouse Science Talent Search, sponsored by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation and Foundation in partnership with the Science Service. Students must submit a written report of an independent research project in mathematics, engineering, and the science. Forty finalists participate in week-long Science Talent Institute in Washington, D.C.. Awards include 40 scholarships: one $40,000, one $30,000, one $20,000, three $15,000, and four $10,000. The remaining 30 finalist receive $1,000 scholarships. Contact: Science Service Inc., Youth Department, 1719 N Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036; (202) 785-2255.

Dec. 9--Education awards: Nominations are due for the 1995 American Heroes in Education Awards, sponsored by the Reader's Digest Association Inc. The program is a national program to honor teachers and principals who are making a difference in schools across America. Educators from 10 schools share $150,000. Individual teachers and principals, or teams of up to six educators, will receive $5,000, with an additional $10,000 going to their schools ongoing activities that encourage educational excellence. Contact: The Reader's Digest Association Inc., American Heroes in Education Awards, c/o Jan Braun, Program Manager, Reader's Digest Rd., Pleasantville, N.Y. 10572.

Dec. 9--Student contest: Applications are due for the "Letters About Literature" Essay Contest, sponsored by Read magazine and the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Students in grades 6-10 are encouraged to write a letter of up to 1,000 words to the author of their favorite book, explaining how the book changed their outlook on life. Contact: Cathy Gourley, Weekly Reader Corporation, 245 Long Hill Rd., Middleton, Conn. 06457; (203) 638-2400.

* Dec. 15--Astronomy: Nominations are due for the Thomas Brennan Award, sponsored by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. The award recognizes expectional achievement related to the teaching of astronomy at the high school level, whether by an active teacher or someone whose work has had a substantial impact on high school astronomy teaching. Winners will receive a plaque, $250, and travel and lodging expenses for the A.S.P.'s summer meeting. Contact: A.S.P., 390 Ashton Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 94112; (415) 337-1100, fax: (415) 337-5205.

Dec. 16--Student contest: Entries are due for the Weekly Reader Writing and Art Awards Contest, sponsored by Read magazine. The contest is open to students in grades 6-12. Students submissions may be in the categories of fiction, essay, and artwork. Fiction entries can be in any style, essay entries must be first-person, and artwork can be in any medium. Contact: Kate Davis, Read Writing and Art Awards, Weekly Reader Corporation, 245 Long Hill Rd., Middletown, Conn. 06457; (203)638-2406.

* Dec. 20--Postsecondary education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education-Innovative Projects for Community Service Program. The awards are distributed by the fund, with an estimated 29 awards ranging from $25,000 to $75,000 each. Contact: U.S.E.D., F.I.P.S.E., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3100, ROB-3, Washington, D.C. 20202-5175; (202) 205-0082 or (202) 708-5750.

Dec. 22--Education research: Applications are due for the Spencer Post-Doctoral Fellowships, sponsored by the National Academy of Education. Individuals who have received a doctorate or equivalent degree between Jan. 1, 1989, and Dec. 31, 1994, in the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, or education, are eligible to submit research proposals that are directly relevant to education. Up to 30 fellowships will be awarded; fellows will each receive $40,000 for one academic year of research, or $20,000 for each of two contiguous years if working half time. Contact: N.A.E., Stanford University, School of Education, CERAS 507, Stanford, Calif. 94305-3084; (415) 725-1003.

Dec. 23--Poetry contest: Entries are due for the Ann Arlys Bowler Poetry Contest, sponsored by Read magazine. An award of $100 will go to each of six students who submit the best poems. Contact: Kate Davis, Ann Arlys Bowler Poetry Contest, Weekly Reader Corporation, 245 Long Hill Rd., Middletown, Conn. 06457; (203) 638-2406.

* Jan. 9--Visual-arts fellowships: Applications are due for the S.A.F./N.E.A. Regional Visual Arts Fellowships, sponsored by the Southern Arts Federation in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Arts. An estimated 30 awards of $5,000 each will go to winners in the areas of sculpture, crafts, and photography. All applicants must submit an application and 10 slides of recent work. Evaluation criteria will include artistic excellence, record of professional activity, and stage of the artist's development. Applicants must be residents of the S.A.F. service region (Ala., Fla., Ga., Ky., La., Miss., N.C., S.C., and Tenn.). Contact: S.A.F., 181 14th St. N.E., Suite 400, Atlanta, Ga. 30309; (404) 872-7244.

Jan. 9--Professional development: Applications are due for the 1995-96 Eleanor Roosevelt Teacher Fellowship, sponsored by the AAUW Education Foundation. The program is designed to enrich classroom teaching, encourage professional developement, and broaden educational opportunities for women. The program emphasis is on increasing girls' participation in math, science, and technology studies. Women classroom teachers who teach full time in grades K-12 are eligible to apply. Contact: AAUW Foundation, Department 14, 2201 N. Dodge St., Iowa City, Iowa 52243-4030. (319) 337-1716 ext.14.

* Jan. 13--Children with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for a new award under its Early Education Program for Children with Disabilities. The award is intended to support activities designed to address the special needs of children with disabilities, from birth through age 8, and their families. An estimated $750,000 will be awarded to an eligible public agency or nonprofit private organization. Contact: Sonya Jenkins, U.S.E.D., 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Switzer Bldg., Room 4617, Washington, D.C. 20202-2644; (202) 205-9077. TDD: Call the Federal Information Relay Service, (800) 877-8339.

Jan. 13--Science: Entries are due for the thirteenth annual Duracell/N.S.T.A. Scholarship Competition, sponsored by Duracell and administerd by the National Science Teachers Association. The competition is open to all students grades 9-12 who are interested in designing and building a device powered by Duracell batteries. Devices should perform a practical function and can be designed to educate, entertain, or make life easier in some way. Each entry must be designed and built by the entrant. There will be 100 prize winners of U.S. Series EE Savings Bonds with values of between $100 - $20,000. Contact: Duracell/N.S.T.A. Scholarship Competition, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100.

Jan. 15--Gifted students: Applications are due for the 1995 International Hollingworth Award Competition. Individuals and educational organizations are eligible to submit a research proposal in the field of education or psychology of gifted children and youths. The winner will be awarded a $2,000 cash grant and a certificate. For information on submission requirements, applicants must send a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Contact: Roxanne H. Cramer, Chairman, H.A.C., 4300 Sideburn Rd., Fairfax, Va. 22030-3507.

Jan. 26--Science: Entries are due for the fifth annual TAPESTRY (Toyota's Appreciation Program for Excellence to Science Teachers Reaching Youth) grant program, sponsored by Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. and administered by the National Science Teachers Association. Forty grants totaling up to $400,000 will be available to teams of one to five science teachers grades 6-12, who propose innovative year-long projects that can be implemented in their school and or school district. Teachers are encouraged to submit proposals for projects in two categories: environmental education and physical science applications. Contact: TAPESTRY, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100.

* Jan. 27--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Technology, Educational Media, and Materials for Individuals with Disabilities Program. The awards are intended to support projects and centers for advancing the availability, quality, use, and effectiveness of technology, educational media, and materials in the education of children and youths with disabilities and the provision of related services to infants and toddlers with disabilities. An estimated five grants averaging $300,000 for the first 12 months will be awarded to institutions of higher education, state and local educational agencies, public agencies, and private nonprofit or for-profit organizations. Contact: Darlene Crumblin, U.S.E.D., Room 3525, Switzer Bldg., 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-2641; (202) 205-8953. TDD: Call the Federal Information Relay Service, (800) 877-8339.

* Jan. 27--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Program for Children and Youth with Serious Emotional Distrubance. The awards are intended to support projects, including research, for the purpose of improving special education and related services to children and youths with serious emotional distrubance, and demonstration projects to provide services for such children and youths. An estimated four grants averaging $173,000 for the first 12 months will be awarded to institutions of higher education, state and local educational agencies, and public and private nonprofit institutions or agencies. Contact: Darlene Crumblin, U.S.E.D., Room 3525, Switzer Bldg., 600 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-2641; (202)205-8953. TDD: Call the Federal Information Relay Service, (800) 877-8339.

* Jan. 27--Media award: Entries are due for the Georgia Association of Educators' 1995 School Bell Media Award. The award recognizes members of the Georgia news media who have demonstrated excellence in communicating public education concerns. Entries in the categories of print, television, radio, and other media must have been published or broadcast between Jan. 1, 1994, and Dec. 3, 1994. Contact: Kevin Pearson, G.A.E. Communications School Bell Media Awards, 3951 Snapfinger Parkway, Decatur, Ga. 30035; (404) 289-5867, ext. 333.

* Jan. 30--Environmental award: Entries are due for the Anheuser-Busch Theme Park's 1995 "A Pledge and a Promise" Environmental Awards. The awards are part of a nationwide program that honors outstanding efforts of school groups that have made contributions to the environment. The program offers 13 awards totaling $100,000. Project entries will be judged in the areas of environmental improvement, such as cleaning up polluted areas, educating others on environmental issues, and working with local groups and government agencies on land-conservation projects. Contact: "A Pledge and a Promise" Environmental Awards, Sea World Education Department, 7007 Sea World Dr., Orlando, Fla. 32821; (407) 363-2389.

Feb. 1--Science: Entries are due for the third annual Toshiba/N.S.T.A. ExploraVision Awards, sponsored by Toshiba and the National Science Teachers Association. The competition asks students K-12 to work in teams of three or four to predict what a form of technology would look like in 20 years. A teacher-advisor and an optional community advisor facilitate each team project. Twelve teams-four first-place teams and eigth second place teams-will be selected as national winners. Each student on the first-place teams wins a $10,000 savings bond; each second-place team member wins a $5,000 savings bond. Contact: Toshiba/N.S.T.A. ExploraVision Awards, National Science Teachers Association, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 22201; (800) EXPLOR-9.

* Feb 1--Music awards: Applications are due for the Wendell Irish Viola Award, sponsored by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Four awards of $700 each will be presented to each winner for continued study of viola with a teacher of the recipient's choice. To be eligible, an entrant must have reached the 12th birthday, but not the 19th birthday, by March 1, 1995. He or she must be a junior member or junior special member. Contact: George Keck, 421 Cherry St., Arkadelphia, Ark. 71923-5116; (501) 246-5076.

Feb. 1--Student competition: Entries are due for the Pratt Institute's 1995 Talent Search scholarship competition, sponsored by the Pratt Institute. The 1995 scholarship winners will receive the scholarship for four years to attend Pratt Institute and transfer students will receive the scholarship for two years. The competion is open to high school seniors and transfer students applying to the institute. Contact: Jean Kiernan, Talent Search Competition, Pratt Institute, 200 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11205; (718) 636-3669 or (800) 331-0834.

* Feb. 6--Science and technology awards: Entries are due for the NYNEX Science and Technology Awards, sponsored by the NYNEX Foundation and administered by the National Science Teachers Association. The competition offers an estimated $750,000 worth of scholarships to 36 teams of high school students in New York State and New England. The competition invites students to devise practical solutions to community problems, using science and technology. Judges will choose 12 finalist teams. Students on the first-place team will each be awarded a $15,000 scholarship; second-place team members will each receive $10,000; and third-place team members, $5,000 scholarships. Students on the remaining nine finalist teams each receive $3,000 scholarships. Contact: (800) 9X-TEAMS.

* Feb. 15--Music scholarships: Applications are due for the Joyce Walsh Junior Scholarship for the Handicapped, sponsored by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Music students with a visual or physical disability may compete for $3,400 in scholarship funds. The first-place winner will receive a scholarship for $750, and the second-place winner, $250, for musical study.To be eligible, an entrant must have reached the 12th birthday, but not the 19th birthday, by March 1, 1995. He or she must be a junior member or junior special member. Contact: Joyce Walsh, 905 Dial Dr., Kennett, Mo. 63857; (314) 888-3347.

* March 1--Teachers Hall of Fame: Nominations are due for the Fourth Annual Teacher Induction Program into the National Teachers Hall of Fame. Five teachers will be selected for induction. Candidates must have (or have had) at least 15 years of classroom teaching as their responsibility in pre-kindergarten through high school. Candidates may be active or retired and must be (or have been) certified public or nonpublic school teachers. All nominations must be submitted on an official form. Contact: N.T.H.F., 1320 C of E Dr., Emporia, Kan. 66801; (800) 96-TEACH; fax: (316) 341-5744.

* March 1--Arts education: Entries are due for the 1995 Young Writer's Award, sponsored by Heldref Publications. Entrants must be under age 35 and are asked to write a paper on any subject concerning K-12 arts-education policy. The winner will receive a $500 prize, and the paper will be published in Arts Education Policy Review. Contact: A.E.P.R. Competitions, H.P., 1319 18th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036-1802; (202) 296-6267; fax: (202) 296-5149.

* March 1--Arts education: Entries are due for the 1995 Reston Prize, sponsored by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, the National Association of Schools of Dance, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the National Association of Schools of Theatre. A $1,000 prize will be awarded to the best paper analyzing policy-based relationships between K-12 arts education and higher education. Papers must be 3,500 to 4,500 words in length and previously unpublished. Contact: Arts Education Policy Review Competitions, Heldref Publications, 1319 18th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036-1802; (202) 296-6267; fax: (202) 296-5149.

March 15--Student contest: Entries are due for the seventh annual Student Editorial Cartoon Contest, sponsored by NewsCurrents. All elementary, middle, and high school students are eligible to enter the contest. One First Prize winner, two Second Prize winners, and two Third Prize winners will be chose from grade categories of K-6, 7-9, and 10-12. The top 100 cartoons will appear in Editorial Cartoons by Kids, 1995, a softcover book. Contact: NewsCurrents Editorial Cartoon Contest, P.O. Box 52, Madison, Wis. 53701.

March 15--Summer seminars: The National Endowment of the Humanities Division of Fellowships and Seminars is inviting applications for summer seminars on a variety of texts in the humanities for four, five, or six week during the summer of 1995. Full-time or regular part-time teachers, at public, private, or parochial schools, grades 7-12, as well as other school personnel, K-12, are encouraged to apply. All teachers selected to participate will be awarded stipends of $2,450, $2,825, or $3,200 each, depending on the length of the seminar. Contact: Public Information Office, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8400.

March 15--Student contest: Entries are due for the MEGAGAME 2000 contest, sponsored by Phantastic Phinds for Phys Ed and US Games. Physical Education students grades 7-12 are asked to develop a new, futuristic game they believe will be the hottest game to come. All game entries must be original in design. The winning entry will receive $100,000 worth of free sporting equipment. Entry forms may be obtained by sending a S.A.S.E. to: Phantastic Phinds for Phys Ed, MEGAGAME 2000, 72532 Edgehill Dr., Suite #2, Palm Desert, Calif. 92260.

* April 3--Poster/essay contest: Entries are due for the 1995 Mothers Against Drunk Driving/7-Eleven Poster and Essay Contest. The contest is open to students in grades 1-12. The theme this year is "Take a Drive on the Safe Side--Steer Clear of Alcohol." National first-place winners will receive $1,000 savings bonds and a trip to the awards ceremony next June in Dallas, Tex. National second-place winners will receive $500 savings bonds; national third-place winners will receive $250 savings bonds. Contact: MADD National Office, (214) 744-6233.

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