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Bennett Announces Panel Appointments

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Advisory Council on Education Statistics: Margaret C. Broad, executive director and chief executive officer, Arizona Board of Regents, Phoenix; Ellis B. Page, professor of educational psychology and research, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; and Ray Turner, assistant superintendent for educational accountability, Dade County Public Schools, Miami.

Jacob K. Javits Fellows Program Fellowship Board: William F. Campbell (reappointment), economics professor, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; Richard W. Couper, president, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, N.J.; Richard R. Joaquim, president, International Conference Resorts Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz.; Tibor R. Machan (reappointment), philosophy professor, Auburn State University, Auburn, Ala.; D. Timothy White, television anchor for the U.S. Information Agency, Arlington, Va.; and Delba Winthrop, guest lecturer at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

National Advisory and Coordinating Committee on Bilingual Education: Rosa E. Apodaca, special assistant for special populations to the general superintendent, Dallas Independent School District; Norma G. Bordelon, civic leader, Woodland Hills, Calif.; Helen P. Warriner-Burke, associate director for languages, Virginia Department of Education, Richmond; Leo R. Lopez (reappointment), manager of the bilingual-education office, California Department of Education, Sacramento; Maria C. Torres, national-origin project director, Maryland Department of Education, Baltimore; Gloria F. Tuchman, teacher, Taft Elementary School, Santa Ana, Calif.; Thanh Van Anderson, national-origin desegregation coordinator, Oklahoma Department of Education, Oklahoma City; and Marcelo R. Fernandez-Zayas, director of bilingual education, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington.

National Advisory Board on International Education: David Funderburk, consultant, Buies Creek, N.C., and former U.S. Ambassador to Romania; Deroy Murdock (reappointment), of Culver City, Calif., student at New York University; Philip J. Palin (reappointment), writer, Stanardsville, Va., and former director, Ronald W. Reagan Scholarship Program at Eureka College; and Garrett N. Scalera (reappointment), of Somerville, N.J., president, Tokyo Institute of Policy Studies, Japan.

National Advisory Committee on Accreditation of Institutional Eligibility: Rodney Albert, student at the University of Oklahoma at Norman; Robert M.L. Baker, president, West Coast University, Los Angeles; Philip J. Gannon, president, Lansing Community College, Lansing, Mich.; Peter G. Mehas, education adviser to the governor of California and director of the governor's office of education planning and policy, Sacramento; Rose Marie Monk, independent contractor, Abilene, Tex.; and Bradford P. Wilson, deputy director of the John M. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs and professor of political science, Ashland College, Ashland, Ohio.

National Board of the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education: Jane Ann Deterding, student at the University of Kansas school of law, Lawrence; David R. Jones, president, National Federation of Independent Businesses, Washington; Leslie Koltai, visiting professor, Graduate Schools of Education, University of California at Los Angeles; Richard H. Sabot, economic researcher, International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington; and the Rev. John W. Whalen, president, Consortium of Universities of Washington, Washington.


APPOINTMENTS

In the Schools


Stephen E. Clum, assistant principal of the Wheaton (Ill.) Christian Grammar School, to principal of the school.

David L. Roth, principal of the Wheaton (Ill.) Christian Grammar School, to headmaster of Lexington (Mass.) Christian Academy.


In the Districts


William Phillips, deputy superintendent of the Minneapolis School District, to interim superintendent of the district.

Pat Scott, a member of the Minneapolis school board, to chairman of the board.


In the States


Kristen Apgar, a staff member of the Massachusetts Department of Education's legal office, to director of the bureau of special-education appeals in the department.

Elizabeth Beh, a community-development and government-relations consultant, to adviser to Governor Robert Casey of Pennsylvania on child-care policy.

Joy S. Berry, lead staff member to the personnel committee of Georgia Governor Joe Frank Harris' Education Review Commission, to executive director of the Human Relations Commission.

Mary-Beth Fafard, director of the office of curriculum and professional development, special-education department, in New York City, to associate commissioner for special education in the Massachusetts Department of Education.


In the Associations


Arleen Arnsparger, host of an arts and entertainment program on Denver's public-television station KRMA-TV, has been named the director of public relations for the Education Commission of the States.

Mary Anne Houx, a member of the Chico (Calif.) Unified School District Board of Education, has been elected president of the California School Boards Association.

James G. Wood, assistant to the president of the New York State United Teachers, to executive director of the state union's field and legal services.


Resignations and

Retirements


Robert J. Solomon, executive vice president of Educational Testing Service since 1970, has announced his retirement effective December 31, 1988.

Photos Captions:


Mary Anne Houx

Art Dept: First is in March. Remove diamond line if you don't go that far. Thanks.

DEADLINES

A symbol () marks deadlines that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.


February 12--Bilingual education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Bilingual Education--Academic Excellence Program, to provide grants to local educational agencies and institutions of higher education applying jointly with lea's for projects to disseminate exemplary programs of transitional bilingual education, developmental bilingual education, or special alternative instruction. An estimated 28 awards, of approximately $125,000 each, will be awarded. Contact: Mary T. Mahony, Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 421, Reporters Building, Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 245-2609.

February 12--Indian education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Indian Education Act, Part A, Formula Grant Program, to provide grants to local educational agencies and certain Indian tribes and organizations for projects that meet the special educational and culturally related academic needs of Indian children. An estimated 1,102 grants, of approximately $40,236 each, will be awarded. Contact: Julie Lesceux, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 2177, Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-5146.

February 12--Mental health, call for proposals: The Association for Humanistic Education is inviting individuals to submit proposals for presentations, workshops, and papers for their annual convention, which will be held in Kentucky on April 15-16. The convention's theme is "Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line." Submissions will be accepted from people in education, health care, and business and industry. Contact: John G. Taylor, Room 229, Wells Hall, Murray State University, Murray, Ky. 42071-3305; (502) 762-2500.

February 15--Teacher fellowships: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Christa McAuliffe Fellowship Program for Fiscal Year 1988, to provide teachers with fellowships to enable them to continue their education or to develop educational projects and programs. It is estimated that between 80 and 128 grants, of approximately $13,000 to $26,704, will be awarded. Contact: Donna Moore, Education Program Specialist, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 2004, Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-5104.

February 16--Equity in education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Women's Educational Equity Act Program, to promote educational equity for women and girls through the development of educational materials and model programs. It is estimated that approximately $2.9 million will be available for these awards in fiscal year 1988. Contact: Alice T. Ford, Women's Educational Equity Act Program, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 2053, FOB-6, Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-4351.

February 29--Black children, call for papers: The National Black Child Development Institute is calling for research abstracts or workshop presentations for its annual conference, which will be held Oct. 12-14. Presentations should address the conference theme, "Empowerment: An Imperative for Black Children and Families." Contact 1988 nbcdi Conference, 1463 Rhode Island Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005; (202) 387-1281.


March 1--Family-support resource guide, call for submissions: The Harvard Family Research Project is inviting public-school-sponsored family-support and education programs to identify themselves for inclusion in a national resource guide describing a diverse set of these programs. Programs offered by schools or in collaboration with other community agencies are eligible for inclusion. Contact: Kathryn Parsons, Families and Schools Research Coordinator, hfrp, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Gutman 301, Appian Way, Cambridge, Mass. 02138; (617) 495-9108.

March 1--Summer humanities seminars for teachers: The National Endowment for the Humanities is inviting applications for its Summer Seminars for School Teachers program, which provides teachers with an opportunity to study seminal works in the humanities through reading, writing, reflection, and discussion. Fifty-three seminars will be offered in the summer of 1988 at 24 locations; applicants may only apply to one. Teachers selected to participate in the program will receive a stipend of $2,000 to $2,750, depending on the length of the seminar. Contact: neh, Division of Fellowships and Seminars, Room 316-SSST-P, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 786-0463.

March 7--Science and mathematics, call for nominations: The National Science Teachers Association and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics are accepting nominations for the 1988 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching. Teachers who have spent at least five years teaching science or mathematics and are currently assigned half-time or more in a junior-high-school, middle-school, or high-school classroom are eligible. Nominations must include the teacher's name, school, and school address, and must also include the nominators signature and connection with the teacher. Contact: John M. Fowler, Project Director, paesmt, nsta Special Projects, 5112 Berwyn Road, 3rd Floor, College Park, Md. 20740; (301) 220-0870.

March 15--Humanities: The Elmira College Center for Mark Twain Studies at Quarry Farm is inviting secondary-school teachers to apply for its four-week National Endowment for the Humanities institute entitled ''Individualism and Commitment in American Life: Concepts and Characters." Applicants who are accepted for the institute, which is being held from July 11 to August 5, will receive a grant for room and board, travel expenses, and book costs, as well as an $800 stipend. Contact: Darryl Baskin, cmtsqf, Elmira College, Elmira, N.Y. 14901; (607) 732-0993.

March 15--Special education: The Orton Dyslexia Society is inviting applications for its annual dissertation award, to be presented at the society's annual conference, which will be held in Tampa, Fla., on Nov. 10-12, 1988. Topics should relate to diagnosis, treatment, or prognosis of dyslexia, but may also include educational, psychological, or neurological aspects of dyslexia. Contact: ods, 724 York Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21204; (301) 296-0232.

March 18--Bilingual education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Bilingual Education: Family English Literacy Program, to provide grants to local educational agencies, institutions of higher education, including junior or community colleges, and private nonprofit organizations, for establishing, operating, and improving English-literacy programs. An estimated six grants, of approximately $100,000 to $150,000 each, will be awarded. Contact: Mary T. Mahoney, Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., (Room 421, Reporters Building), Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 245-2609.

March 18--Special education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Special Alternative Instructional Programs, to provide grants to local educational agencies and institutions of higher education applying jointly with one or more lea's, for establishing, operating, and improving special alternative instructional programs. An estimated 12 grants, of approximately $60,000 to $90,000 each, will be awarded. Contact: Robert Trifiletti, Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., (Room 421, Reporters Building), Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 245-2609.

March 25--Teaching seminar: The Smithsonian Institution is inviting elementary- and secondary-school teachers to apply for a special one-week course entitled "Teaching Writing Using Museums and Other Community Resources." The course, worth three graduate credits, will be offered in the summer of 1988 to teachers living more than 75 miles outside the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. Contact: National Seminars, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Arts and Industries Building, Room 1163, si, Washington, D.C. 20560; (202) 357-3049.


April 1--History: The National Endowment for the Humanities and the Harvard Graduate School of Education are inviting applications from New England-area junior- and senior-high-school teachers of history and/or social studies to participate in a four-week program, "American History: The Female Experience." This graduate-level study of recent scholarship and historical texts in the field of American women's history, is being held form July 5 to July 29 on the campus of the hgse Participants' schools will be expected to contribute $100 towards the cost of materials that will be provided for each participant's school. Remaining costs are funded through a grant from neh and the hgse Contact: Women's History Institute, ppe, 339 Gutman Library, hgse, Cambridge, Mass. 02138; (617) 495-3572.

April 1--Humanities: The National Endowment for the Humanities and the College of the Holy Cross are inviting high-school social-studies and Latin teachers from the U.S. to apply for enrollment in a four-week summer institute entitled, "Polis and Res Publica: Classical Political Theory and the U.S. Constitution," to be held July 11-August 5. Applications by teams of two--a social-studies and a Latin teacher--from the same school or school district are strongly encouraged. Each participant will receive a stipend of $800 plus room, board, materials, and transportation costs. The school district of each participant will be asked to contribute $200 and to provide at least two days of release time for the participant during the follow-up year for implementation of the institute program. Contact: David Schaefer, Co-Director, "Polis and Res Publica," hcc, Worcester, Mass. 01610; (617) 793-3361.

April 15--Limited-English-proficiency education, call for proposals: The Innovative Approaches Research Project of Development Associates Inc., is inviting proposals to conduct a school-based research and demonstration project focused on an innovative approach to educating language-minority exceptional students who have limited proficiency in English. The two-year project is being conducted for the U.S. Education Department's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs. Contact: Christine Rourke, iarp, Bin #ES-2, da, 2924 Columbia Pike, Arlington, Va. 22204; (703) 979-0100.

April 15--Principals: The Principals' Center at Harvard University is inviting applications from principals to participate in a 10-day institute on "The Principal and School Improvement," to be held July 11-20 at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, Mass. Contact: Programs in Professional Education, hgse, 339 Gutman Library, Cambridge, Mass. 02138; (617) 495-3572.

April 30--Special education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under Section 722 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act; Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program, to provide assistance to state educational agencies to plan and implement programs for the education of homeless children and youths. An estimated 52 awards of approximately $50,000 to $406,371, based on the formula distribution of funds mandated by the McKinney Act, will be granted. Contact: Richard LaPointe, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., (Room 2198-6257), Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-5113.

April 31--Children's literature, call for papers: The Children's Literature Association is calling for papers to be read at its special session, which will be held in New Orleans in December 1988. Papers should concentrate on aspects of narrative theory and their application to children's literature, and should be designed to be read in 20 minutes, although expanded versions may be considered for publication in the Children's Literature Association Journal in early 1990. Contact: Peter Hunt, School of English and Journalism, University of Wales, Cardiff CF1 3EU, Wales, U.K.


May 13--Television in education, call for nominees: The National Broadcasting Company Inc. and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching are inviting entries for the NBC National Teachers' Awards, to recognize high-school teachers for projects that use television to teach about freedom of the press. To participate, teachers must submit a four- to six-page essay about the television-news project they have devised and photocopies of the two best samples of their students' work for the project. Ten teachers from across the nation will be presented with awards of $1,000 each. Contact: Cathy Lehrfeld, Media Representative, NBC, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10112; (212) 664-2594.

May 15--Librarians: The American Library Association is inviting nominations and applications for its "Hugh C. Atkinson Award," to recognize outstanding accomplishments by academic librarians working in library automation or management who have improved library service, development, or research. The award, which consists of an unrestricted $2,000 prize and a plaque, will be given at the association's 1988 annual conference in New Orleans. To be eligible for the award, the nominee must be a librarian employed in a university, college, or community library in the year prior to application, and must have a minimum of five years of professional experience in an academic library. Contact: Michael Gorman, Chairman, Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award 1988, University of Illinois, 246A Library, 1408 W. Gregory, Urbana, Ill. 61801; (217) 333-0318, or Mary Ellen K. Davis, Association of College and Research Libraries/ala, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, Ill. 60611; (312) 944-6780.


June 1--Vocational education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards, under the Vocational Educational Program for Hawaiian Natives, to provide assistance to any organization recognized by the Governor of Hawaii and primarily serving and representing Hawaiian natives, to plan, conduct, and administer vocational-education projects or portions of projects benefiting Hawaiian natives. Approximately one award, of $2,082,870, will be granted. Contact: Kate Holmberg, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, used, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 519, Reporters Building, Washington, D.C. 20202; (202) 732-3263.


July 15--Education issues, call for manuscripts: The National Council of Administrative Women in Education is calling for manuscripts on contemporary issue in education for possible inclusion in the council's journal. Contact: Geraldine Chapey, School of Education, St. John's University, Grand Central and Utopia Parkways, Jamaica, N.Y. 11439; (718) 990-6205.

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