Published Online:

City News Roundup

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

A Dorchester County, S.C., jury has awarded $50,000 in damages to the mother of a mildly retarded student whose mouth was washed out with soap by her teachers.

The jury ordered that the special-education teacher and her aide pay $25,000 in actual damages and $25,000 in punitive damages, according to a spokesman for Charles S. Goldberg, the attorney representing Barbara McQueen and her 18-year-old daughter, Joyce A. McQueen. The lawsuit was filed in the Dorchester County Court of Common Pleas.

Ms. McQueen, who suffers from cerebral palsy, was forced to eat the soap three times in an attempt to wash her mouth out after she used the word "damn" three times despite a warning from her teacher, according to the spokesman. The soap caused Ms. McQueen's throat to constrict and her mouth to swell, the spokesman said.

At the time of the incident, Ms. McQueen and her teacher had been discussing a homework assignment that had not been completed.

The decision has been apealed by the attorney for the two teachers.


The U.S. Supreme Court last week refused to free Indiana from the responsibility of paying for the desegregation of Indianapolis's public schools, an obligation that cost the state almost $8 million during the 1981-82 school year.

The Court, without comment, let stand U.S. District Judge S. Hugh Dillin's 1981 ruling that the state must pay the full cost of busing thousands of inner-city Indianapolis students to suburban schools for desegregation purposes. Last March, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit upheld Judge Dillin's order in the case, United States v. Board of School Commissioners of Indiana.

The courts found the state liable for the segregation of public schools in Indianapolis and surrounding Marion County because the state adopted legislation that merged the city and county governments but failed to consolidate school districts in the area.

The state argued that the lower courts' decisions unlawfully overturned a state law requiring the state to split evenly with school districts the cost of desegregating school districts.


SUBJ:
City News Roundup

Education Week
Volume 2, Issue 15, December 22, 1982, pp 2-3

Copyright 1982, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

City News Roundup

The Los Angeles Unified School District is projecting a $46-million deficit for the 1983-84 school year, according to C.R. Caldwell, the district's budget director.

Mr. Caldwell said the district's financial problems stem from several factors: the lack of a "cost-of-living" funding adjustment from the state this year, its "inability to contain the rising cost of health and welfare benefits," and a decline in the large interest earnings it has enjoyed for the last two years.

Following the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, Mr. Caldwell said, school budgets have been much more closely linked to state revenues, and the state's current fiscal problems have affected many California districts.

At this point, Mr. Caldwell said, there are no teacher raises scheduled for the current year, and the 1983-84 projections assume that this will not change.

Significant cuts in instructional programs have already occurred, he said, "and there is virtually nothing of substance left to cut except employee health and welfare costs."


After three years of planning, the work on the first "community-education park" in Dade County, Fla., got underway this month with a ground-breaking ceremony.

The park is being funded jointly by the Dade County school board, the state of Florida, and the city of Miami Beach. Some federal funding has also been used.

The new facility will link the Leroy D. Fienberg Elementary School with a nearby community- and adult-education center. When complete, the complex will include two school facilities, the park, new playing fields, an auditorium, an adult-education terrace, and a music building. Residents of all ages will be able to use the facilities. In addition to elementary-school classes, the center will offer classes for adults, recreation programs, athletic leagues, community theater, and social-service programs for the elderly and for immigrants.


A Summerville, S.C., jury has awarded $50,000 in damages to the mother of a mildly retarded student who was forced by her teachers to eat soap.

The jury ordered that the special-education teacher and her aide pay $25,000 in actual damages and $25,000 in punitive damages, according to a spokesman for Charles S. Goldberg, the attorney representing Barbara McQueen and her 18-year-old daughter, Joyce A. McQueen. The lawsuit was filed in the Dorchester County Court of Common Pleas.

Ms. McQueen, who suffers from cerebral palsy, was forced to eat the soap three times after she used the word "damn" three times despite a warning from her teacher, according to the spokesman. The soap caused Ms. McQueen's throat to constrict and her mouth to swell, the spokesman said.

At the time of the incident, Ms. McQueen and her teacher had been discussing a homework assignment that had not been completed.

The Dorchester County school board has appealed the jury's decision.

Web Only

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented