Blog

Your Education Road Map

Politics K-12®

ESSA. Congress. State chiefs. School spending. Elections. Education Week reporters keep watch on education policy and politics in the nation’s capital and in the states. Read more from this blog.

Federal

Slim Hope for ESEA Reauthorization, Say Education ‘Insiders’

By Lauren Camera — August 14, 2014 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act will never be reauthorized. At least that’s what 20 percent of education “insiders” surveyed by a Washington consulting group think.

The new survey released Thursday by Whiteboard Advisors found that 72 percent of a small group of key education influentials agreed that, at the very least, Congress won’t update the federal education law until after December 2015.

“We are only six years behind,” mocked one respondent. “What’s the rush now?”

The report is based on an anonymous survey of 50 to 75 “key education influentials,” including policymakers, thought leaders, and association heads.

The education thought-leaders surveyed saw much higher prospects for lawmakers reauthorizing the Higher Education Act. While none believed it would be accomplished by this December, 32 percent said it may be completed by December 2015.

Those opinions likely stem from the movement on higher education legislation in both chambers. The House passed three small bipartisan higher education bills before lawmakers left for summer recess, and Senate Democrats are readying to introduce a reauthorization bill sometime this fall, based largely on the discussion draft it unveiled in June.

Within the higher education space specifically, the education wonks said that year‐round Pell Grants, federal tuition assistance for students from low- and middle-income families, are the most likely to be signed into law. That’s not a surprising finding since the chairmen of both the House and Senate education committees included that proposal in their Higher Education Act reauthorization blueprints.

Overall, however, 86 percent of the education experts disapprove of how Congress is handling education.

The group surveyed also had a bevy of opinions on the U.S. Department of Education and Education Secretary Arne Duncan. While Duncan earned a higher job approval rating that the White House, respondents largely agreed that his “policies remain controversial":


  • 36 percent approve of the Obama administration’s handling of education;
  • 42 percent approve of Duncan’s job performance overall;
  • 44 percent approve of Duncan’s efforts related to higher education; and
  • 36 percent approve of Duncan’s efforts related to K‐12 policy.

Those numbers generally reflect education policies that the education professionals termed ineffective.

For example, almost 80 percent of the education insiders do not think that the department’s 50‐state teacher equity strategy will have any more impact on the equitable distribution of teachers than past federal efforts. The Education Department announced the equity plan last November, and it’s set to eventually include technical assistance for states and the publication of state educator-equity profiles.

Said one snarky commenter: “This will accomplish nothing. Were I an Ed Week editor, my only challenge in reviewing an article on this subject would be deciding whether to use ‘gauzy’ or ‘pablum’ in the title.”

We’ll take that into consideration ...


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
6 Key Trends in Teaching and Learning
As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and a return to the classroom for many—we come better prepared, but questions remain. How will the last year impact teaching and learning this school
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Attendance Awareness Month: The Research Behind Effective Interventions
More than a year has passed since American schools were abruptly closed to halt the spread of COVID-19. Many children have been out of regular school for most, or even all, of that time. Some
Content provided by AllHere
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Ensuring Continuity of Learning: How to Prepare for the Next Disruption
Across the country, K-12 schools and districts are, again, considering how to ensure effective continuity of learning in the face of emerging COVID variants, politicized debates, and more. Learn from Alexandria City Public Schools superintendent
Content provided by Class

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal White House Launches Hispanic Education Initiative Led by Miguel Cardona
President Joe Biden said his administration intends to address the "systemic causes" of educational disparities faced by Hispanic students.
2 min read
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona writes down and draws positive affirmations on poster board with students during his visit to P.S. 5 Port Morris, a Bronx elementary school, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021 in New York.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visits students in New York City at P.S. 5 Port Morris, a Bronx elementary school in the Bronx last month.
Brittainy Newman/AP
Federal Feds Add Florida to List of States Under Investigation Over Restrictions on Mask Mandates
The Education Department told the state Sept. 10 it will probe whether its mask rule is violating the rights of students with disabilities.
3 min read
Surrounded by lawmakers, Florida Gov.Ron DeSantis speaks at the end of a legislative session on April 30, 2021, in Tallahassee, Fla.
Surrounded by lawmakers, Florida Gov.Ron DeSantis speaks at the end of a legislative session on April 30, 2021, in Tallahassee, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee/AP
Federal How Biden Will Mandate Teacher Vaccines, Testing in Some States That Don't Require Them
President Joe Biden's COVID-19 plan will create new teacher vaccination and testing requirements in some states through worker safety rules.
4 min read
Nurse Sara Muela, left, administers the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine to educator Rebecca Titus at a vaccination site setup for teachers and school staff at the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Reading, Pa., on March 15, 2021.
Nurse Sara Muela administers a COVID-19 vaccine to educator Rebecca Titus at a vaccination site for at the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Reading, Pa.
Matt Rourke/AP
Federal Biden Pushes Schools to Expand COVID-19 Testing, Get More Teachers Vaccinated
President Joe Biden set teacher vaccine requirements for federally operated schools as part of a new effort to drive down COVID's spread.
7 min read
President Joe Biden speaks in the State Dining Room at the White House, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Washington. Biden is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant.
President Joe Biden in a speech from the White House announces sweeping new federal vaccine requirements and other efforts in an renewed effort to stem the COVID-19 pandemic.
Andrew Harnik/AP