School Choice & Charters

Proposed K-12 Cuts Could Hit Charter, Private Schools

By Alyson Klein — April 05, 2017 3 min read

Private and charter schools were considered the big winners in President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget blueprint, which seeks new money to expand student options, while slashing other K-12 spending. The problem for some schools of choice? Private and charter schools would be squeezed by the proposed cuts, just like regular public schools.

The Trump administration’s budget blueprint would include $1.4 billion in new money for school choice, including additional funds for charters, but it would get rid of Title II, the $2.3 billion main federal program for improving teacher quality, and the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, a $1.1 billion program that helps finance after-school and extended-day programs.

Private and charter schools and students receive funding, or at least services, from both programs, explained Sheara Krvaric, a lawyer with the Federal Education Group, a law firm that specializes in K-12 programs.

Some states treat charter schools or networks of charters as separate districts. That means, if they qualify for federal grants, such as Title I for disadvantaged students, Title II, career and technical education money, or others, they get it, under the same set of rules as those for traditional public schools.

The share of Title II dollars going to charters isn’t trivial. In California, for example, it’s about 10 percent of funding, or an estimated $23 million of the state’s roughly $234 million in Title II funding.

And the cuts could sting.

In the District of Columbia, for instance, Eagle Academy, a charter school, gets roughly $82,000 in Title II funding. The school serves about 900 children between two campuses, most of them in poverty, and allocates its Title II dollars to help teachers use technology in the classroom and better understand their students’ social and emotional needs.

“If this was taken away from us, that would hurt,” said Joe Smith, the school’s chief financial officer. And he doesn’t think the new funding for charters would necessarily make up for it. “I don’t know what the new money is for. But I know what Title II is for. It’s for any school that serves poor children, to help their students.”

The cuts to the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program would also be tough for some charters to swallow. Thurgood Marshall Academy, another District of Columbia charter school aimed at preparing students for legal careers, receives about $285,000 from the program, or about 3 percent of its overall budget.

With that money, it offers a half-day summertime program to help students get acclimated to high school and pays teachers to stay after school. The academy also supports tutoring students and staffing the computer lab, along with helping students travel to local law firms for tutoring and mentoring.

And the school uses 21st Century funds to help pay for more than two dozen after-school clubs, from a chess club to a “green” club that gives students the chance to sell and grow fresh produce.

“It’s not peanuts. ... When I read through the budget, I was absolutely most concerned about the cut” to after-school, said Richard Pohlman, its executive director. “Those concerns were not addressed by the increase to charter schools.”

Private schools are supposed to be able to take advantage of districts’ Title II dollars, too. In Wisconsin, for example, home to a long-standing voucher program, nearly a quarter of the state’s roughly $25 million in Title II funding benefits private and religious schools, or about $5 million total, said Tony Evers, the state chief. Districts must consult with private schools about how they want the dollars used—they can’t just make the decision for them.

The cuts, particularly to Title II funding would hit private schools the same way they would hit public schools, said Joe McTighe, the executive director of the Council for American Private Education. “It would have a proportional impact on us,” McTighe said.

Department’s Focus

For her part, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said in a statement that the budget’s focus is on “investing in education programs that work, and maintaining our department’s focus on supporting states and school districts in providing an equal opportunity for a quality education to all students.”

And an Education Department official said the intent of the budget is to channel money to the programs that are of the highest value to students.

A version of this article appeared in the April 05, 2017 edition of Education Week as Proposed K-12 Cuts Could Also Hit Charter, Private Schools

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Here to Stay – Pandemic Lessons for EdTech in Future Development
What technology is needed in a post pandemic district? Learn how changes in education will impact development of new technologies.
Content provided by AWS
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Strategies & Tips for Complex Decision-Making
Schools are working through the most disruptive period in the history of modern education, facing a pandemic, economic problems, social justice issues, and rapid technological change all at once. But even after the pandemic ends,
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Education Funding Webinar
From Crisis to Opportunity: How Districts Rebuild to Improve Student Well-Being
K-12 leaders discuss the impact of federal funding, prioritizing holistic student support, and how technology can help.
Content provided by Salesforce.org

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School Choice & Charters Full-Time Virtual Schools: Still Growing, Still Struggling, Still Resisting Oversight
Nearly 500,000 students now attend full-time online and blended schools, says a new report from the National Education Policy Center.
6 min read
Student attending class from a remote location.
E+
School Choice & Charters Opinion Is Hybrid Home Schooling the Future of Education?
Rick Hess speaks with Mike McShane about hybrid home schooling, which combines the best of home schooling and traditional schooling.
7 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School Choice & Charters Oklahoma Charter Schools Granted Local Tax Revenue in 'Seismic' Settlement
A groundbreaking settlement will fundamentally change the way charter schools are funded in Oklahoma, despite vehement opposition.
Nuria Martinez-Keel, The Oklahoman
3 min read
This July 19, 2019 photo shows an Epic Charter Schools office in Oklahoma City. The Oklahoma State Board of Education voted Thursday in favor of an agreement with the state's public charter school association to settle a 2017 lawsuit.
This July 19, 2019 photo shows an Epic Charter Schools office in Oklahoma City. The Oklahoma State Board of Education voted Thursday in favor of an agreement with the state's public charter school association to settle a 2017 lawsuit.
Sue Ogrocki/AP
School Choice & Charters COVID-19 May Energize Push for School Choice in States. Where That Leads Is Unclear
The pandemic is driving legislators' interest in mechanisms like education savings accounts, but the growth may not be straightforward.
8 min read
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds delivers her Condition of the State address before a joint session of the Iowa Legislature on Jan. 12 at the statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa.
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds delivers her Condition of the State address to state lawmakers on Jan. 12. She's pushing a major school choice expansion.
Bryon Houlgrave/The Des Moines Register via AP