Federal Opinion

NCLB Turns 10

Ten years after President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act into law on Jan. 8, 2002, NCLB is now overdue for reauthorization in Congress. Bipartisan in its origins but controversial in its execution, NCLB, which is the latest version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, expanded the federal role in education and targeted improving the achievement of disadvantaged students. To reflect on the law’s anniversary, the Education Week Commentary editors asked a range of K-12 education leaders, politicians, teachers, and child advocates for their thoughts. This package also includes links to Education Week’s coverage over the decade, readers’ comments, and a glossary of selected NCLB terms.

Mary Bell
Mary Bell
Education Perspectives on the No Child Left Behind Act
In recognition of the 10th anniversary of the No Child Left Behind Act, Education Week Commentary asked leaders in the K-12 community to consider the law’s impact.
January 11, 2012
17 min read
Mary Bell
Mary Bell
Education NCLB: Perspectives on the Law
In recognition of the 10th anniversary of the No Child Left Behind Act, Education Week Commentary asked leaders in the K-12 community to consider the law’s impact.
January 5, 2012
34 min read
Lamar Alexander
Lamar Alexander
Federal Commentary NCLB Lessons
Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., says that while NCLB has been a noble experiment, most decisions about education should be local.
Lamar Alexander, January 5, 2012
4 min read
George Miller
George Miller
Federal Commentary NCLB: A Landmark Law for Children
The No Child Left Behind Act marked a major step forward for school reform, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., writes.
George Miller, January 5, 2012
3 min read