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Developments on Swine Flu Worldwide

By The Associated Press — April 30, 2009 1 min read
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Key developments on swine flu outbreaks, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and government officials:

—Deaths: 159 in Mexico, seven confirmed as swine flu and rest suspected. One confirmed in U.S., a 23-month-old boy from Mexico who died in Texas.

—Sickened: 2,498 suspected and 19 confirmed in Mexico. Confirmed elsewhere: at least 93 in U.S.; 16 in Canada; 14 in New Zealand; five in Britain; three in Germany; 10 in Spain; two in Israel; and one in Austria.

—U.S. cases confirmed by CDC and state officials: 51 in New York, 14 in California, 16 in Texas, three in Maine; two in Kansas, two in Massachusetts, and one each in Indiana, Ohio, Arizona and Nevada. CDC also said Michigan had two, but state officials said only one was confirmed.

—Texas Gov. Rick Perry issues disaster declaration, and state suspends all high school sports competitions until May 11.

—Some schools closed in Illinois, New York City, Texas, California, South Carolina, Connecticut, Minnesota and Ohio. Texas closings affected 53,000 students. Mexico suspends all schools until May 6.

—U.S. Food and Drug Administration issues emergency guidance allowing certain antiviral drugs to be used in broader range of population if needed. Public health emergency declared and roughly 12 million doses of Tamiflu from federal stockpile to be delivered to states.

—Cuba bans flights from Mexico; Argentina suspends flights from Mexico; U.S., European Union, other countries discourage nonessential travel there. Travelers arriving from Mexico questioned. Cruise lines avoid Mexico ports.

—Two leading U.S. makers of respiratory masks are ramping up production to keep heavy demand from pharmacies.

—Mexico City hands out surgical masks, closes public venues and cancels public events. President assumed new powers to isolate infected people. World Bank loaning Mexico more than $200 million.

—Egypt begins slaughtering nation’s roughly 300,000 pigs as precaution.

—World Health Organization alert at Phase 4 of 6, meaning disease spreads easily but isn’t pandemic.

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Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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