Recruitment & Retention

California Turns Down District’s Bid to Lengthen Pre-Tenure Period

By Stephen Sawchuk — May 09, 2014 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

California’s state board of education has squashed a request by the San Jose district and its teachers’ union to lengthen some teachers’ probationary period from two to three years, reports John Fensterwald at EdSource.

In putting together a new evaluation system, the parties had decided to institute a peer-review system for novice teachers. Peer review works by assigning each probationary teacher a mentor and documenting their improvement; at the end of the two-year period, a joint labor-management panel would decide whether each teacher had progressed enough to receive tenure, which confers due-process protections.

In a few cases, the San Jose officials said, the panel should be permitted to extend the probationary period for a third year and give a teacher on the borderline a bit more time to meet standards.

But the state’ s board of education, under heavy lobbying from the California Teachers Association—the parent of the San Jose union affiliate—decided not to permit the plan. Board members said it was too broad an exception to state rules, and that such a change would require legislative approval instead, Fensterwald reports.

One of the really interesting things here is the CTA’s undercutting of its own local affiliate’s wishes. A letter it sent to the state explains why: Giving the district this option would set a “precedent that denies fundamental aspects of due process,” the union claims, because the peer-review panel’s decision couldn’t be appealed. It also says the plan violated CTA internal policy.

Lurking in the background on all this, as EdSource notes, is a looming ruling in the Vergara v. California lawsuit. That suit takes aim at the state’s tenure law, stating that the two-year period is too short to make meaningful determinations of quality. The CTA joined the defense in this lawsuit and has provided a lot of legal muscle for it; apparently, it doesn’t want a rogue local upending the two-year timeline on its own.

Related Tags:

A version of this news article first appeared in the Teacher Beat blog.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
6 Key Trends in Teaching and Learning
As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and a return to the classroom for many—we come better prepared, but questions remain. How will the last year impact teaching and learning this school
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Ensuring Continuity of Learning: How to Prepare for the Next Disruption
Across the country, K-12 schools and districts are, again, considering how to ensure effective continuity of learning in the face of emerging COVID variants, politicized debates, and more. Learn from Alexandria City Public Schools superintendent
Content provided by Class
Teaching Profession Live Online Discussion What Have We Learned From Teachers During the Pandemic?
University of California, Santa Cruz, researcher Lora Bartlett and her colleagues spent months studying how the pandemic affected classroom teachers. We will discuss the takeaways from her research not only for teachers, but also for

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Recruitment & Retention Download GUIDE: How Administrators Can Address Staff Shortages in Schools
The number of job openings in schools this year is daunting, but there are steps district leaders can take to keep operations running smoothly.
1 min read
group of diverse people fading away
Getty
Recruitment & Retention This District Built a Better, More Reliable Supply of Substitute Teachers. Here's How
A Rhode Island school district tackles one of the biggest staffing challenges for school administrators. So far, it's working.
6 min read
Substitutes size is fine
Getty
Recruitment & Retention Many Feared an Educator Exodus From the Pandemic. It Doesn't Seem to Have Happened. Yet.
A RAND Corporation survey of district leaders finds that predictions about principals and teachers fleeing their jobs haven't panned out.
5 min read
People form two lines in front of an Exit sign
E+/Getty
Recruitment & Retention Schools Pay a High Price for Low Teacher Salaries
Teacher turnover rates are rising and more than half of teachers said a salary hike could persuade them to stay in the classroom longer.
4 min read
Conceptual image of salary.
Collage by Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: iStock/Getty)