Education

Supt. Who Led Post-Katrina Recovery of Gulf District Dies

By Christina A. Samuels — May 05, 2011 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

From guest blogger Michelle A. Anderson:

Kim Myrick Stasny, one of the many superintendents on the front lines in the aftermath of one of the nation’s most deadliest hurricanes, has died due to brain tumor-related complications. She was 55.

Stasny, who was the superintendent of the Oxford (Miss.) City Schools at the time of her death, gained media attention for leading rehabilitation efforts in the Bay St. Louis-Waveland District after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast school system in August 2005. The hurricane destroyed four of the district’s six schools leading to a 40 percent decline in enrollment.

In February 2006, Education Week featured Stasny and her rehabilitation efforts in a story titled, “The New Normal.” At the time, students—who had missed 47 days of school—were living in temporary homes and were being taught in portable classrooms. Stasny led school officials through weekly meetings with architects, construction firms, and a Federal Emergency Management Association representative in an effort to rebuild the Bay St. Louis-Waveland district.

During the 2005-2006 year, the district spent more than half of its $19 million annual budget on clean-up and renovations and had become one of many districts to criticize FEMA for failing to provide financial assistance in a timely manner.

Oxford City Schools Assistant Superintendent Brian Harvey, who took over for Stasny after she announced a planned two-month medical leave in April, told local news media that the district lost “a wonderful educator, administrator and friend.”

“Dr. Stasny’s compassion and optimism will be missed. She always saw the best in all people and in every situation,” Harvey said.

Stasny joined the Bay St. Louis-Waveland District in 1990 and became the superintendent in 1999. She served in that position for 10 years before becoming the first woman to direct the Oxford City Schools in July 2009. Prior to becoming an administrator, she taught for seven years and went on to become a principal at an elementary school in the Hancock County (Miss.) School District.

She earned a bachelor’s degree from Millsaps College in Jackson, Miss., a master’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi and a doctorate from the University of New Orleans. She served on the governing boards of the American Association of School Administrators and the Mississippi Association of School Administrators, which awarded Stasny with a “Superintendent of the Year” award before she joined Oxford Schools.

Stasny is survived by her husband, her sister, and her mother.

A version of this news article first appeared in the District Dossier blog.

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Building Teacher Capacity for Social-Emotional Learning
Set goals that support adult well-being and social-emotional learning: register today!


Content provided by Panorama
Jobs October 2021 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education California Makes Ethnic Studies a High School Requirement
California is among the first in the nation to require students to take a course in ethnic studies to get a diploma starting in 2029-30.
4 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Democratic Assembly members, from left, James Ramos, Chris Holden Jose Medina, and Rudy Salas, Jr., right, huddle during an Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Medina's bill to make ethnic studies a high school requirement was signed into law by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)