Opinion
Education Opinion

Nine People Who Will Shape Education in the Next 10 Years

By Sara Mead — May 13, 2014 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Four the past three years on this blog, I’ve profiled young leaders whose work in education is likely to have a transformative impact on their communities or the broader field in the next 10-20 years. These individuals have included teachers, charter school leaders, non-profit leaders, advocates, policy wonks, researchers, and tech entrepreneurs. Many of them have gone on to do amazing things in the few short years since I first profiled them. Profiling these individuals has also been a great blessing for me; they’ve challenged my thinking in numerous ways and I’ve learned a great deal from them.

This year I’m pleased to publish my fourth list of young education leaders. These amazing people include a teacher and teachers union leader, a principal, a district leader, an organizer and advocate, education technology leaders, and researchers. In their interviews, they discuss some of the most challenging issues and exciting opportunities in public education today, including school accountability, personalized learning, empowering teachers, and the relationship of education outcomes and reform to broader social justice questions. I think you’ll enjoy hearing from them, too:


  • Dan Caroll, Co-Founder and COO, Clever, Inc.
  • Madaline Edison, Executive Director, Educators for Excellence Minnesota
  • Anne Hyslop, Policy Analyst, New America Foundation
  • Joe Manko, Principal, Liberty Elementary School, Baltimore City Public Schools
  • Morgan Polikoff, Assistant Professor, University of Southern California
  • Shauntel Poulson, Principal, NewSchools Venture Fund
  • Elliot Sanchez, Founder and CEO, mSchool
  • Shakera Walker, Senior Manager of Teacher Leadership and Professional Development, Boston Public Schools
  • William Wong, Teacher, Gabrielino High School and President, San Gabriel Teachers Association

While I’m very excited to share my conversations with these interesting and inspiring people, I’m also somewhat sad to say that this is the last time I’ll publish this series on this blog. When I started this series 4 years ago, I was, at 31, in roughly the same demographic as the young leaders I profiled. As I prepare to turn 36 later this year and age out of the target demographic for this series, it seems like time to hand this project off. Readers of this blog may also have noticed that my posting has become much more sporadic in the past year, as I’ve taken on additional responsibilities in my day job, so I’ll be closing up this blog at the end of the series in order to focus on my Bellwether work and a new Bellwether team blog we’ll be launching soon. Fortunately, Ed Week’s editors assure me that all the blog archives will remain available on the site, so the past interview series will continue to be available here for the foreseeable future.

The opinions expressed in Sara Mead’s Policy Notebook are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Judge's Temporary Order Allows Iowa Schools to Mandate Masks
A federal judge ordered the state to immediately halt enforcement of a law that prevents school boards from ordering masks to be worn.
4 min read
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks to reporters following a news conference, Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, in West Des Moines, Iowa. Reynolds lashed out at President Joe Biden Thursday after he ordered his education secretary to explore possible legal action against states that have blocked school mask mandates and other public health measures meant to protect students against COVID-19. Reynolds, a Republican, has signed a bill into law that prohibits school officials from requiring masks, raising concerns as delta variant virus cases climb across the state and schools resume classes soon. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Education Hurricane Ida Deals New Blow to Louisiana Schools Struggling to Reopen
The opening of the school year offered teachers a chance to fully assess the pandemic's effects, only to have students forced out again.
8 min read
Six-year-old Mary-Louise Lacobon sits on a fallen tree beside the remnants of her family's home destroyed by Hurricane Ida, in Dulac, La., on Sept. 4, 2021. Louisiana students, who were back in class after a year and a half of COVID-19 disruptions kept many of them at home, are now missing school again after Hurricane Ida. A quarter-million public school students statewide have no school to report to, though top educators are promising a return is, at most, weeks away, not months.
Six-year-old Mary-Louise Lacobon sits on a fallen tree beside the remnants of her family's home destroyed by Hurricane Ida, in Dulac, La., on Sept. 4, 2021.
John Locher/AP
Education Massachusetts National Guard to Help With Busing Students to School
250 guard personnel will be available to serve as drivers of school transport vans, as districts nationwide struggle to hire enough drivers.
1 min read
Massachusetts National Guard soldiers help with logistics in this Friday, April 17, 2020 file photo, at a food distribution site outside City Hall, in Chelsea, Mass. Mass. Gov. Charlie Baker on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, activated the state's National Guard to help with busing students to school as districts across the country struggle to hire enough drivers.
Massachusetts National Guard soldiers help with logistics in this Friday, April 17, 2020 file photo, at a food distribution site outside City Hall, in Chelsea, Mass.
Michael Dwyer/AP
Education FDA: ‘Very, Very Hopeful’ COVID Shots Will Be Ready for Younger Kids This Year
Dr. Peter Marks said he is hopeful that COVID-19 vaccinations for 5- to 11-year-olds will be underway by year’s end. Maybe sooner.
4 min read
Dr. Peter Marks, director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a Senate health, education, labor, and pensions hearing to examine an update from federal officials on efforts to combat COVID-19 on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 11, 2021. On Friday, Sept. 10, 2021, Marks urged parents to be patient, saying the agency will rapidly evaluate vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds as soon as it gets the needed data.
Dr. Peter Marks, director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a Senate health, education, labor, and pensions hearing to examine an update from federal officials on efforts to combat COVID-19 on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 11, 2021.
Jim Lo Scalzo/AP