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5 Major Benefits of Blended Learning

By Matthew Lynch — May 18, 2018 2 min read
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Modern classrooms are slowly taking a new approach to imparting wisdom and knowledge to the upcoming generation. Traditional classroom teaching techniques are giving way to a new system of blended learning. Teachers who are embracing this new classroom style are easily reaping the benefits of having their old methods enhanced with the use of new technology. Overall, it’s the students who will benefit from this unique method of academia.

Are you still unconvinced that blended learning is the way of the future? Take a look at these five major benefits of blended learning that are certain to change your mind.

Blended learning is more efficient.

Years ago, a teacher may have spent days explaining a math concept with an overhead projector. It was difficult to assess student understanding and engagement using these dry methods. Today, blended learning can help teachers to more accurately assess the student’s knowledge and help to teach concepts more efficiently. It is said that blended learning improves the efficacy and efficiency of the entire learning process.

Blended learning makes education more accessible.

With traditional teaching methods, educational materials were only available during classroom hours. Students may have been able to take their textbooks home with them, but they didn’t have a way to actually interact with or engage the material. With new learning apps and other technological advances, they have more flexibility to access and engage academia from home. This accessibility could translate to a much greater interest in learning and more successful outcomes.

Students can pace themselves.

Blended learning that uses apps, games, or measurable programs to teach concepts allows students to engage the material at their own pace. This helps to balance a classroom that contains both quick and slow learners. Every student can practice and tackle new material with timing that is perfect just for them. It can promote deeper learning, reduce stress, and increase student satisfaction.

Teachers can become more engaged with their students.

Blended learning presents an increased opportunity for students to connect with their professors and teachers. They can connect via email, through progress reports on the program, or on message boards. This learning style promotes a number of effective means for teachers and students to become more engaged with one another. In the end, both parties can benefit from this shift in the relationship. Teachers can stay in touch with student progress, while students can ask more questions and gain deeper knowledge.

This method is more fun for everyone.

Students used to dread the lengthy lectures and boring seminars that comprised their academic day. Now, they find that learning can be more fun which is extremely advantageous to all involved parties. An entire generation of students who discover that blended learning can be fun could shape the future of education. Students may be more apt to pursue higher education if they have a positive experience with learning in their formative years. Fun shouldn’t be underestimated as one of the many benefits of blended learning.

Changing the norm of traditional teaching tactics can be challenging, particularly for seasoned teachers. However, the new blended learning experience has some extremely advantageous properties. Find out what your students could be missing out on without this teaching tactic. In the end, it is better for both students and teachers to make good use of all the technology available in a modern classroom.

The opinions expressed in Education Futures: Emerging Trends in K-12 are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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