Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education

Justices Decline to Hear Appeal of Dismissed New Orleans Teachers

By Mark Walsh — May 19, 2015 1 min read

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear an appeal on behalf of thousands of New Orleans teachers who were terminated after Hurricane Katrina. It appears to be the end of the line for the teachers who lost their jobs after the state Recovery School District took over the city’s school system after the devastating 2005 hurricane.

The appeal stemmed from a class action brought on behalf of some 7,500 teachers in the Orleans Parish school system who were dismissed in the months after Hurricane Katrina struck on Aug. 29, 2005. After the hurricane, 102 of the city’s 126 public schools were transferred to the state-created Recovery School District.

Some separate lawsuits involving the dismissed teachers’ rights brought by the United Teachers-New Orleans were settled, but the class action continued and met some success in lower state courts. Those courts had found there were due-process violations and that authorities had failed to place the teachers on a two-year recall list as required by state law.

But last October, the Supreme Court of Louisiana ruled 5-2 against the teachers and dismissed their case. It held that depriving the teachers priority consideration for re-employment did not deny them a property right and that the chance that any teacher from the class would actually be rehired appeared remote.

In their appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court in Oliver v. Orleans Parish School Board (Case No. 14-1090), the dismissed teachers argued that the Orleans Parish School Board and various state defendants “violated well settled constitutional law regarding 14th Amendment due-process rights of tenured public school employees.”

The teachers “here had a reasonable expectation of resuming their pre-Katrina employment positions upon their return to New Orleans,” the appeal said.

The justices declined the appeal without comment on May 18.

A version of this news article first appeared in The School Law Blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Project Manager (Contractor)
United States
K12 Inc.
Elementary Teacher
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Special Education Teacher
Chicago, Illinois
JCFS Chicago
Elementary Teacher - Scholars Academy
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read