Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education

Do the Common Standards Need Clarifying?

By Catherine Gewertz — March 23, 2012 1 min read

There has been lots of interesting discussion recently about the Common Core State Standards. Here are a few of the things worth reading, beginning with observations from two people who are actually out there doing the work:

• A Minnesota teacher writes in the Daily Planet about her conversion from skeptic to fan of the English/language arts standards. Part one of her reflections is here, and part two is here.

• A New York state teacher reports on his first brush with the common standards. Penning a guest column for The Washington Post‘s Valerie Strauss, a common-core critic, teacher Jeremiah Chaffee says that the standards are “out of sync ... with what I consider to be good teaching.” Chaffee says he found exemplar lessons for the standards too scripted, and disagrees with the standards’ emphasis on close reading.

• In a commentary piece for EdWeek, education consultant Mike Schmoker and education professor Gerald Graff welcome the standards’ emphasis on argumentation, but caution that those sections of the standards need to be slimmed down and clarified so they don’t “drown out and obscure” their own good intentions.

• A newspaper editor in Arkansas who attended a statewide summit about the common core is not sold. Roy Ockert, editor emeritus of the Jonesboro Sun, says that too few members of the general public know what the standards are. He makes the worrisome observation that there has been precious little coverage of the standards in mainstream newspapers, something I’ve noticed with concern myself.

• And the debate goes on about whether federal officials essentially forced states to adopt the standards. In response to a white paper and newspaper column (both of which we told you about in an earlier blog post) arguing that the feds overstepped, Christopher Cross, a former federal department of education official who helped craft regulations about the federal department’s role in curriculum, contends that states freely embraced the standards.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Curriculum Matters blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Director of Information Technology
Montpelier, Vermont
Washington Central UUSD
Great Oaks AmeriCorps Fellow August 2021 - June 2022
New York City, New York (US)
Great Oaks Charter Schools
Director of Athletics
Farmington, Connecticut
Farmington Public Schools
Head of Lower School
San Diego, California
San Diego Jewish Academy

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read