Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education

Del. Initiative Aims to Improve College Access for Low-Income Students

By Caralee J. Adams — September 18, 2013 1 min read

Too often, disadvantaged high school students lack the resources needed to apply to the colleges where they are most likely to succeed.

A new initiative sponsored by the College Board, several elite colleges, and the state of Delaware aims to address that problem by giving students application information and support for the best college match.

This fall, low-income students with high academic potential will get a packet of materials with detailed information about applying to college, financial aid, and college application fee waivers. The mailing will also include letters from each school in the Ivy League, as well as Stanford University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, encouraging them to apply.

“Too many students are turned off to a college because they don’t know about all of the available financial assistance or they underestimate their qualifications,” said Gov. Jack Markell in a press release. Our partnership with the College Board is a significant step toward solving these challenges.”

Students with the potential to succeed at selective institutions often under-match because they aren’t aware of the opportunity, know someone who has attended, or realize there is often generous financial aid available, according to research by Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University. Not only can these schools be more affordable, but the retention and graduation rates are often higher because the institutions have more resources to invest in instruction and student supports.

The effort announced in Delaware today, which includes mailings to 2,200 students, is part of a larger effort by the College Board to expand college access. Earlier this summer, the College Board committed to sending information packets about the college search to the top 10 to 15 percent of SAT test-takers in the Class of 2014 whose families make under $40,000 a year. The cost of the packets was expected to be $8 to $10 per student.

A version of this news article first appeared in the College Bound blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
The 4 Biggest Challenges of MTSS During Remote Learning: How Districts Are Adapting
Leaders share ways they have overcome the biggest obstacles of adapting a MTSS or RTI framework in a hybrid or remote learning environment.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Superintendent, Dublin Unified School District
Dublin, California (US)
Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates
Superintendent, Dublin Unified School District
Dublin, California (US)
Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES
Larkspur, California
Tamalpais Union High School District
Special Education Teachers
Lancaster, PA, US
Lancaster Lebanon IU 13

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read