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Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012, 2–3 p.m. ET
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 Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores(10/02/2012) 
11:11
Bryan Toporek: 
Good morning, and welcome to today's free live chat, "Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores," with content underwritten by the Lumina Foundation. I've just opened the chat for questions, so please start submitting any you have down below.

We'll be back at 2 p.m. ET with Stacy Caldwell, the vice president of the College Board, and Steve Kappler, the assistant vice president for educational services at ACT. Hope you can join us!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 11:11 Bryan Toporek
1:57
Bryan Toporek: 
Good afternoon, folks, and thanks again for joining us for today's free live chat, "Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores," with content underwritten by the Lumina Foundation. We'll get underway in just a few minutes.

In the meantime, please continue submitting any questions you have for our two expert guests below. Thanks!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 1:57 Bryan Toporek
2:00
Bryan Toporek: 
To kick things off, I'm passing the chat over to our moderator for the day, Caralee Adams.

Take it away, Caralee!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:00 Bryan Toporek
2:01
Caralee: 
Hi everyone! Welcome to today’s discussion of the college entrance exams.

The SAT and ACT have been in the news recently as scores for the Class of 2012 were just released.

Everyone is waiting for the big push toward improving career and college readiness to pay off. The good news is that more students than ever are taking college-entrance exams. But, student performance is declining.

What will it take for scores to improve? Will the Common Core State Standards be what finally moves the dial on performance?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:01 Caralee
2:02
Caralee: 
Today we are joined by two experts to answer your questions Steve Kappler from ACT and Stacy Caldwell with the College Board, which administers the SAT. I’ll let both guests introduce themselves. First, Steve….
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:02 Caralee
2:02
Steve Kappler: 
Good afternoon, I am Steve Kappler from ACT and happy to take part in this coversation today.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:02 Steve Kappler
2:02
Caralee: 
and Stacy...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:02 Caralee
2:02
Stacy Caldwell: 
Good afternoon! And thank you for the opportunity to participate in this discussion. My role at the College Board is Vice President of District and State Assessments & Initiatives. My team is responsible for our Pathway Assessments: Readistep, PSAT/NMSQT, and District & State SAT implementations. I also have a team of educators that work deeply with school districts to support College Readiness for all students.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:02 Stacy Caldwell
2:02
Caralee: 
Thanks to both of you.

Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:02 Caralee
2:03
Caralee: 
First, let's talk about the growth in test takers – Between the two tests more than 3 million high school students took an exam last year – what are schools doing right that more students are taking the test? Why the increase?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:03 Caralee
2:03
Caralee: 
Stacy, you first...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:03 Caralee
2:05
Stacy Caldwell: 
As educators across the country increasingly recognize the value of post secondary education, we see increasing demands for access to tools that support college readiness,,,
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:05 Stacy Caldwell
2:06
Stacy Caldwell: 
We have seen and supported increased access to the SAT through a number of initiatives, including our fee waiver program, and SAT district and state led initiatives
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:06 Stacy Caldwell
2:07
Caralee: 
Thanks. Steve, your thoughts?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:07 Caralee
2:07
Steve Kappler: 
The growth in test takers is likely attributed to several factors...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:07 Steve Kappler
2:07
Steve Kappler: 
some of which Stacy just mentioned...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:07 Steve Kappler
2:08
Steve Kappler: 
the most important of which are an increased awareness in the importance of going to college, as well as many states and districts bringing an awerness of College and Career Readiness at earlier ages through testing and interventions, and finally an increase in the number states using the exams as their state test.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:08 Steve Kappler
2:08
Caralee: 
Thanks. Let's to to a question from Drew.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:08 Caralee
2:08
[Comment From DrewDrew: ] 
what is the current thinking comparing SAT, ACT and high school GPA with regards to measurable outcomes in college (GPAs, graduation rates etc.).
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:08 Drew
2:08
Caralee: 
Stacy, can you address please?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:08 Caralee
2:09
Stacy Caldwell: 
Our research continues to show that the combination of SAT and High School GPA is the best predictor of not only 1st year college GPA but also 4th year GPA - meaning that the combination really helps predict college success
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:09 Stacy Caldwell
2:10
Caralee: 
Steve?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:10 Caralee
2:11
Steve Kappler: 
We have several studies on our website that address the college outcomes of tested students - in general we see a strong correlation between success in college and benchmark attainment on the ACT especially when coupled with HS GPA -- it is a very strong prredictor
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:11 Steve Kappler
2:11
Caralee: 
Thanks. Another one from John
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:11 Caralee
2:11
[Comment From John NygrenJohn Nygren: ] 
How many students who take your tests are only trying to pass their state tests?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:11 John Nygren
2:11
Caralee: 
Stacy?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:11 Caralee
2:12
Stacy Caldwell: 
Students who take the SAT are taking it as a college entrance exam. We do have a few states where the students are required to take the SAT to graduate, but it is not a specific substitute for a state test.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:12 Stacy Caldwell
2:13
Caralee: 
Thanks. Here's a good question from Kathy..
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:13 Caralee
2:13
[Comment From KathyKathy: ] 
How can classroom teachers prepare their students for these tests? Will implementation of Common Core better prepare students?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:13 Kathy
2:13
Caralee: 
Steve, would you address?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:13 Caralee
2:14
Steve Kappler: 
As a curriculum based assessment, if teachers can teach to a higher set of standards, like te common core standards or ACT's College Readiness standards they will help to preapre students...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:14 Steve Kappler
2:15
Steve Kappler: 
Yes, I beleive that the implementaiton of CCSS will have an impact - but only if implementred with a focus on teaching and learning ....
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:15 Steve Kappler
2:16
Steve Kappler: 
we need to use assessment to drive interventions at an earlier age so that we can get mpore students on trak for college success sooner
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:16 Steve Kappler
2:16
Caralee: 
Thanks, Steve.

Your take, Stacy, on what classroom teachers can do to help students prepare and the impact of Common Core?
.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:16 Caralee
2:16
Stacy Caldwell: 
There is clearly a strong correlation between completing rigorous coursework and scoring better on the SAT. The College Board has been a consistent advocate and collaborator in the development of the state standards, and we believe they will provide a rigorous learning platform for our nation's students. Completely agreed with Steve's point that the real challenge is in the high quality implementation of those standards.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:16 Stacy Caldwell
2:17
Caralee: 
Thanks. On to Rachelle...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:17 Caralee
2:17
[Comment From RachelleRachelle: ] 
Do you feel that the increase in number of students testing could be a major contributing factor to the flat test scores?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:17 Rachelle
2:17
Caralee: 
Steve, first...?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:17 Caralee
2:19
Steve Kappler: 
That is likely the case - as we see more students taking the assessment that had not planned too-- the best part about that is when a student who hadn't planned to go to college - recieves a good score, meets a few benchmarks and sfinally believes they are college material.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:19 Steve Kappler
2:19
Caralee: 
Stacy? your thoughts?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:19 Caralee
2:19
Stacy Caldwell: 
Yes. The key takeaway for us this year is that only 43% of the students who took the SAT this year are college ready. As we expand the number of students who want to pursue a college degree, we have to ensure that more and more students are actually prepared - during high school - to be ready for post secondary work....
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:19 Stacy Caldwell
2:20
Stacy Caldwell: 
There is strong connection between completing a rigorous core curriculum and college readiness: students who complete a core curriculum are more college ready, and score higher on college readiness exams (+144 on the SAT). As do students who complete honors or AP courses (+250 or more on the SAT)
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:20 Stacy Caldwell
2:20
[Comment From NancyNancy: ] 
How much can test prep help? Are there specific prep companies that you would recommend over others? What should students look for in a prep agency?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:20 Nancy
2:21
Caralee: 
Steve?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:21 Caralee
2:21
Steve Kappler: 
Since we are a curriculum based assessment , we advocate for taking a solid rigorous core curriculum as the best possible test prep...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:21 Steve Kappler
2:22
Caralee: 
I know College Board provides online tools for preparing for the SAT......what is the organization's take on SAT prep companies? Any recommendations, Stacy?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:22 Caralee
2:23
Stacy Caldwell: 
The best preparation for the SAT is to take rigorous courses, study hard, and do well in those courses. This is backed up by extensive research.

Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:23 Stacy Caldwell
2:23
[Comment From Mindy LampertMindy Lampert: ] 
What can parents do to help students on the tests and for success on the college level?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:23 Mindy Lampert
2:23
Caralee: 
Steve first?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:23 Caralee
2:23
Stacy Caldwell: 
In addition we have a full set of free and low cost resources online to support preparation for the SAT
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:23 Stacy Caldwell
2:23
Caralee: 
Thanks, Stacy. Now to parental help? Steve, then Stacy...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:23 Caralee
2:24
Steve Kappler: 
Get them to take the right courses in a logical progression, make sure they study, and have them take a practice test prior to so they understand timing ... also get a good nights sleep and eat prior to the test - sounds simple enough but it helps
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:24 Steve Kappler
2:25
Stacy Caldwell: 
Parents should encourage students to take rigorous courses. Especially going into high school, make sure that your student is scheduled to take courses that keep them on a college ready track and set them up to take honors or AP courses as they progress.

And read as much as possible!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:25 Stacy Caldwell
2:25
Caralee: 
Sleep is a good idea - but hard to enforce with teenagers!
Like the reading comment too.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:25 Caralee
2:25
Caralee: 
On to Tiffany
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:25 Caralee
2:25
[Comment From TiffanyTiffany: ] 
How do we encourage students to prepare EARLY...like as 9th graders? Many still think they can "cram" for the SAT.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:25 Tiffany
2:26
Caralee: 
Thoughts, Steve? I know the ACT is really focusing on earlier preparation...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:26 Caralee
2:27
Steve Kappler: 
Correct we are, we find it is essentail for success and getting students on track..... one way to get them engaged early is by using career and educaitonal expoloration so they can find their areas of interest sooner.....
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:27 Steve Kappler
2:28
Steve Kappler: 
we do this with our EXPLORE assessment in 8th grade and find that students are mpore apt to succeed when their interest align with the major or career they choose.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:28 Steve Kappler
2:28
Caralee: 
Thanks.

Stacy.....what about the notion of cramming for the SAT? How can we get students to think earlier about getting prepared?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:28 Caralee
2:28
Stacy Caldwell: 
In many of our school districts, we actually try very hard to get a college-going culture and conversation into the middle school....students (especially first generation college-going students) need to be thinking about this early.

We support this early conversation and rigor with a set of initiatives and programs, including the ReadiStep assessment in the 8th grade.

As for motivating middle schoolers and 9th graders - challenging! Our recommendations follow the work of folks deep in this: make coursework relevant, provide them multiple paths, etc.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:28 Stacy Caldwell
2:29
Stacy Caldwell: 
There is no way to cram for the SAT
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:29 Stacy Caldwell
2:29
Caralee: 
Okay, next question...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:29 Caralee
2:29
[Comment From ChristinaChristina: ] 
Is it possible that the testmakers may be increasing the test's difficulty level, because students are performing better due to prep courses?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:29 Christina
2:29
Caralee: 
are you guys just making the tests harder...Stacy?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:29 Caralee
2:31
Stacy Caldwell: 
Well, first, our research has not shown that short term test prep increases SAT scores.

And, no - we are not making the test harder. (We have deep and published research about our equating process to ensure that's true.)
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:31 Stacy Caldwell
2:31
Caralee: 
Steve....has the difficulty level of the ACT changed in recent years?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:31 Caralee
2:32
Steve Kappler: 
At ACT, we use out National Curriculun survey, given every 2-3 years to thousands of educators around the country, to calibrate our assessment to the curriculum being taught - we study not only what is being taught but survey college professors on what will be needed for success in their courses... that said, the difficulty of the assessment has not changed in recent years...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:32 Steve Kappler
2:32
Caralee: 
Some good comments I want to share...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:32 Caralee
2:32
[Comment From Robert A.Robert A.: ] 
I really like the comment about the best test prep is reading. It is so true. The kids who read the most tend to do best on these exams.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:32 Robert A.
2:32
[Comment From TiffanyTiffany: ] 
Our scores went up, even though we're still below the national/state averages. More screening and doggedly pursing our students for after-school prep helped.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:32 Tiffany
2:33
Caralee: 
Here's a question....Stacy first?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:33 Caralee
2:33
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Do you recommend taking both the ACT and SAT?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:33 Guest
2:34
Stacy Caldwell: 
While we encourage all students to take a college entrance exam, we've actually found that students who repeat taking the SAT typically have their scores go up by on average 30 points. So, we think there's value to a repeat of the same test.

Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:34 Stacy Caldwell
2:35
Caralee: 
Steve? ACT and SAT?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:35 Caralee
2:35
Steve Kappler: 
Sure, it can only help to give colleges and universities a more well rounded picture of you as a student and your abilities relative to academic achievement - an admissions director will tell you they more they know bout the student the more likely they are to be able to predict their success at my institution.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:35 Steve Kappler
2:36
Caralee: 
Moving on....what impact with the Common Core State Standards have?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:36 Caralee
2:36
[Comment From CarlosCarlos: ] 
Are there any plans to change the SAT/ACT to align with CCSS?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:36 Carlos
2:37
Stacy Caldwell: 
First, the SAT is aligned to the Common Core State Standards as well or better than any assessment that has been developed for college admission or placement. In addition, with our new president, David Coleman - a key architect of the common core - starting later this month, we are committed to building deeper alignment to ensure the SAT reflects the key components of the CCSS.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:37 Stacy Caldwell
2:38
Caralee: 
Steve....how will CCSS affect the ACT?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:38 Caralee
2:38
Steve Kappler: 
Boith organoizations were major contributors to the creation of the CCSS - so many of the standards are founded in the research from both organizations... at ACT our College Readiness Standards are very closely aligned with the CCSS already - in fact we have an alignment study on our website... as well as a First Look at where the naiton stands relative to the CCSS.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:38 Steve Kappler
2:38
[Comment From KathyKathy: ] 
Is it advisable to recommend that students take these test multiple times? Do they really improve their scores significantly?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:38 Kathy
2:39
Caralee: 
Thanks.
I know you addressed this Stacy?
What about repeat attempts for the ACT, Steve?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:39 Caralee
2:39
Steve Kappler: 
We do see some improvements over time - many times it is becasue they have progressed in school and have taken some tougher courses that help them to understand some of the items they may not have ...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:39 Steve Kappler
2:40
Steve Kappler: 
as well as the issue of understading the assessment environment ... what it is really like on the day of the assessment
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:40 Steve Kappler
2:40
[Comment From Kirk JopowiczKirk Jopowicz: ] 
With many schools districts requiring students to sit for SAT's as a result of grants, what impact wil the changing nature and make up of the student populations have on tests? Especially in regions of the country where there is a large immigrant, non-English speaking population? Tests like SAT/ACT are then being used for accountability measures. How can we adjust for that?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:40 Kirk Jopowicz
2:41
Caralee: 
Steve....thought on the impact of districts requiring all juniors to take the ACT - this is growing...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:41 Caralee
2:42
Steve Kappler: 
As i mentioned before, we do see a drop in benchamark attainment and composite scores when the state test is first administered - but over time we see steady improvement back to levels above what was being achieved when it was just a self selected audience.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:42 Steve Kappler
2:43
Caralee: 
Thanks. Interesting comment....are more test takers the goal?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:43 Caralee
2:43
[Comment From Kirk JopowiczKirk Jopowicz: ] 
Why is the increase"better"? More kids in college has lowered standards and forced colleges to create more remedial classes since more are unprepared and meanwhile many businesses can't find skilled workers to employ.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:43 Kirk Jopowicz
2:43
Caralee: 
You want to respond first, Stacy?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:43 Caralee
2:44
Stacy Caldwell: 
We saw this year a more diverse population taking the SAT then we ever had, and we see the mix of students taking the test increasingly be representative the population in our nation's classrooms. As the College Board's mission is to connect ALL students to college success, we think this is generally a good trend, and encourage broader access for students.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:44 Stacy Caldwell
2:44
Caralee: 
Steve?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:44 Caralee
2:44
Stacy Caldwell: 
@ Kirk: more specifically to your question. The actual goal is to get more students college ready, not more students taking the test
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:44 Stacy Caldwell
2:45
Stacy Caldwell: 
Using assessments as a benchmark to help schools/districts provide increased supports and earlier interventions for students is one of the paths to increasing the number of students who are prepared for college and career
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:45 Stacy Caldwell
2:45
Steve Kappler: 
It's not solely about more students testing - it is to get more student ready for college and do so sooner.... students who are not on track to be college ready in 8th grade are likely not going to be college ready in 12th grade - we must put more emphasis on getting students on track sooner
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:45 Steve Kappler
2:46
Caralee: 
Thanks. Another comment.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:46 Caralee
2:46
[Comment From JasonJason: ] 
Isn't it time we focused more on the overall number of students scoring at the college-readiness level on the SAT, instead of focusing on whether the average score increased? Isn't the bottom line question whether our schools are preparing more kids for college? In Houston ISD, 52 percent of the students in the Class of 2010 took the SAT, compared to 92 percent in the Class of 2012. Hundreds more are prepared for college, but the average score dropped.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:46 Jason
2:46
Caralee: 
Question from Barb.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:46 Caralee
2:46
[Comment From BarbBarb: ] 
If school districts are pushing their students to take these tests, will they start providing their own test prep methods or are you seeing schools still using outside companies to provide these services?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:46 Barb
2:46
Caralee: 
Steve....thoughts for Barb?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:46 Caralee
2:47
Stacy Caldwell: 
Jason: we couldn't agree more.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:47 Stacy Caldwell
2:48
Steve Kappler: 
I believe that imroving teaching and learning in classrooms across the country is the key to success in our educaitonal system - teh ACT and our assessments are just tools to help educators better understand student progression
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:48 Steve Kappler
2:48
Caralee: 
Thanks.

Here's an interesting question....linked to the wide performance gap between white students and racial/ethnic minorities.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:48 Caralee
2:50
Caralee: 
Sorry, can't find exact question..but Stacy, can you address the concern many have about differences in performance on the SAT?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:50 Caralee
2:51
Caralee: 
based on parent education? race? etc?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:51 Caralee
2:51
[Comment From GeorgeGeorge: ] 
What would you say to people who point out that studies indicate that minority students do much worse on SATs and ACTs, on average, than non-minority students? Or do you feel that's beyond the scope of an objective test?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:51 George
2:51
Caralee: 
Sorry. Here it is...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:51 Caralee
2:52
Caralee: 
Stacy, then Steve please?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:52 Caralee
2:54
Stacy Caldwell: 
We see differences in SAT performance across a number of dimensions. Score differences tend to reflect inequities in our education system. Students from underserved minority groups tend to have less access to a core curriculum, rigorous coursework, and they are less likely to have parents who graduated from college - all factors that we see affecting college readiness and SAT performance

Students who take rigorous coursework (with core being defined as 4 years of ELA, 3 years each of math, science, and social science/history) score higher on the SAT across all socioeconomic groups
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:54 Stacy Caldwell
2:55
Caralee: 
Thanks.
Steve?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Caralee
2:55
Steve Kappler: 
we do see schools and districts in areas that serving these populations that are achieving at higher levels than others schools like them - it can be done - with a focus on a system that pushes career and educaitonal exploration, has higher standards, uses monitoring and intervening - and improves rigor in the classroon while using data informed instructional practices - at ACT our Core Practice Framework (on our website) details many of these practices - the ones that truly impact acheivement
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Steve Kappler
2:55
Caralee: 
Comment from Robert...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Caralee
2:55
[Comment From Robert A.Robert A.: ] 
Good teaching improves scores on these exams, not formal test prep. However, when students take multiple practice exams, they are less "stressed" and are more familiar with the pace of the exam. Test prep cannot address remediation - only teaching can.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Robert A.
2:55
Stacy Caldwell: 
We, as a nation, need to do better at addressing these inequities and ensuring all students who want to pursue a college degree are prepared to succeed
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Stacy Caldwell
2:55
Steve Kappler: 
@Robert -- great point
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Steve Kappler
2:55
Caralee: 
Now a question...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:55 Caralee
2:56
[Comment From Larry RichLarry Rich: ] 
Do you believe college and career readiness are the same and how does your assessment help educators guide students in both of these areas?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:56 Larry Rich
2:56
Caralee: 
Stacy first, please?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:56 Caralee
2:57
Stacy Caldwell: 
We believe that the skills needed for success in college are the same skills that will be needed for success in a 21st century workplace
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:57 Stacy Caldwell
2:57
Caralee: 
Steve? Career and college skills the same?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:57 Caralee
2:58
Steve Kappler: 
the core skills need for success in first year of college or into a career are very similar - fundamental math skills - and as mentioned, reading skills... as well as the nocognitive behavior measures...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:58 Steve Kappler
2:58
Caralee: 
a comment...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:58 Caralee
2:58
[Comment From Kirk JopowiczKirk Jopowicz: ] 
The focus needs to be on learning, exploration and creativity. It's normal and OK for a kid coming out of MS not to know what they want to do or be. Our goal as educators needs to be to prepare them for and to be OK with life's choices. A narrow college only focus may not be for all kids. I'm in HISD and we cannot say more are prepared for college just because more took the test. They are not if the score dropped.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:58 Kirk Jopowicz
2:58
Caralee: 
Question...
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:58 Caralee
2:58
[Comment From AkilAkil: ] 
Since so many school districts are so cash strapped, why is paying for the SAT/ACT instead of letting students pay alone or apply for fee waivers a sound fiscal decision?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:58 Akil
2:59
Caralee: 
Response, Stacy?
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:59 Caralee
2:59
Steve Kappler: 
things like school wise- do i study, and listen in class, what are my mtoivaitons to succeed... inm the workpolace - will I show up on time and work hard while I am there - these are the sucess drivers couple with achievment
Tuesday October 2, 2012 2:59 Steve Kappler
3:00
Stacy Caldwell: 
We consider the SAT an investment in developing a college-going culture and expanding the number of students prepared for success in college and career.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:00 Stacy Caldwell
3:00
Caralee: 
That's all the time we have. Thanks to our guests for their excellent information.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:00 Caralee
3:00
Stacy Caldwell: 
Thank you!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:00 Stacy Caldwell
3:01
Caralee: 
And thanks to the participants for their thoughtful questions.
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:01 Caralee
3:01
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks, everyone, for joining us for today's free live chat, "Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores," with content underwritten by the Lumina Foundation. I'd like to extend a special thanks to our two expert guests, Stacy and Steve, and our moderator Caralee.

We'll have a transcript of today's chat posted on this same page within the hour. Have a great rest of the day!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:01 Bryan Toporek
3:01
Caralee: 
Thanks, Bryan!
Tuesday October 2, 2012 3:01 Caralee
3:01
 

 
 
 

Moving the Dial on SAT and ACT Scores

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012, 2–3 p.m. ET
Underwriting for the content of this online chat has been provided by The Lumina Foundation.

In recent years, scores on college-entrance tests have been virtually flat. More students than ever are taking the exams, which the testing organizations say explain, in part, the lack of improvement. States and districts are ramping up efforts to improve college readiness. What will it take for schools to see dramatic improvements in SAT and ACT scores? Representatives from both testing organizations joined us for a live chat to discuss the latest scores from the class of 2012 and offered recommendations for moving the dial.

Guests:
Steve Kappler, assistant vice president for educational services, ACT
Stacy Caldwell, vice president, College Board

Caralee Adams, contributing writer, Education Week, moderated this chat.

Related Stories:
  • ACT Finds Most Students Still Not Ready for College (August 22, 2012)
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