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Response to Intervention—In Theory and In Practice


Thursday, March 24, 2 p.m. EDT
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 Response to Intervention—In Theory and In Practice(03/24/2011) 
10:11
edweekbryan: 
Good morning, folks. We've just opened the chat for questions, so please sumbit yours down below. We'll be back at 2pm EDT to discuss RTI with David Putnam, Darren Woodruff, and Katie Tackett -- be sure to join us then. Cheers!
Thursday March 24, 2011 10:11 edweekbryan
11:47
At what grade levels is your school or district using RTI?
Elementary
 ( 47% )
Middle
 ( 12% )
High
 ( 16% )
None of the Above
 ( 26% )

Thursday March 24, 2011 11:47 
1:42
After learning more about RTI how are you feeling about it?
Excited
 ( 25% )
Still have a lot to learn
 ( 53% )
Hesitant
 ( 8% )
Skeptical
 ( 14% )

Thursday March 24, 2011 1:42 
1:58
edweekbryan: 
Hey there, folks. We're about ready to kick off our chat on RTI, so I'm going to hand it over to our moderator today, Nirvi Shah. Take it away, Nirvi!
Thursday March 24, 2011 1:58 edweekbryan
1:59
Nirvi Shah: 
Welcome, everyone, to our discussion about response to intervention, in theory and in practice. I'm very excited to have such a wonderful group of guests here to answer your questions. They are David Putnam Jr., a director of response to intervention for the Tigard-Tualatin School District in Oregon; Darren Woodruff, co-director of the National Center on Response to Intervention; and Kathryn Tackett, coordinator of state technical assistance for the Center.

It would be great if each of you, in that order, could just tell us briefly about yourselves and your experience with RTI.
Thursday March 24, 2011 1:59 Nirvi Shah
2:02
Nirvi Shah: 
And after that, let's dive right in here. First, a good question from MoOzarks. Darren, if you could take this one to start, that would be great.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:02 Nirvi Shah
2:02
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
I'm interested in the basics - what is RTI?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:02 MoOzarks
2:03
Darren Woodruff: 
Hi Everyone. I'm in my 4th year co-directing the National Center on RTI, my background is in implementing supports for at risk students and disproportionality in special ed.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:03 Darren Woodruff
2:03
Nirvi Shah: 
Guests if you would be so kind as to reference the name of the preson who asked the question in your answer, that would be great.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:03 Nirvi Shah
2:03
Katie Tackett: 
I am the Coordinator of TA and Product Development for the National Center on RTI (www.rti4success.org). Before coming here, I worked on a project on RTI implementation at the Center on Instruction (www.centeroninstruction.org). I also worked as a reading teacher in a school implementing RTI K-3.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:03 Katie Tackett
2:05
Nirvi Shah: 
And David, if you would answer this question from Gene.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:05 Nirvi Shah
2:05
[Comment From Gene RampenthalGene Rampenthal: ] 
I am concerned about the phrase in the description for this chat that "Educators use 'tiered intervention' models-of which RTI is one type- to improve school discipline.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:05 Gene Rampenthal
2:06
Darren Woodruff: 
The National Center defines RTI as integrating student assessment and evidence-based interventions within a multi-level prevention system. The goal is to identify learning or behavioral challenges as early as possible and to maximize student achievement.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:06 Darren Woodruff
2:06
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, Gene's question is similar to this one from Charlene, if you could tackle this one.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:06 Nirvi Shah
2:06
[Comment From Charlene DiCalogeroCharlene DiCalogero: ] 
My understanding of RtI is that it is a tiered structure for making decisions about when to get students extra help, and to assist educators in making more appropriate and timely recommendations for intervention. It is not itself a "model" because it does not involved specific instructional practices (researched or not). Yet the description says RtI is only "one type" of tiered intervention model. Is this because RtI recommends percentages of students who should be at each tier? It is a recommendation with no research basis, as far as I can tell. Seems like the interventions should be based on students' needs in a given school, not on some predetermined idea that any given group of students only has 20% of students who need extra help and/or referral to SPED services.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:06 Charlene DiCalogero
2:07
Nirvi Shah: 
And David, perhaps another one for you from Crystal.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:07 Nirvi Shah
2:07
[Comment From CrystalCrystal: ] 
Looking for inexpensive ways to do RTI for math, without purchasing a program. I currently use edhelper and print, but I would love a document to test for problem areas. I have 6, 7, and 8 grade.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:07 Crystal
2:08
David Putnam: 
Hello All--I am the director of the Oregon Response to intervention project, a state funded project to provide RTI support and develpopment services to districts across the state of Oregon.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:08 David Putnam
2:08
Katie Tackett: 
Charlene (and Gene) - RTI is a framework for allocating resources and providing services to students based on demonstrated need. The phrase "response to intervention" itself is in IDEA with the purpose of assisting in the identification of learning disabilities. Tiered interventions is a broader term to encompass those models that might not have an eligibility component.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:08 Katie Tackett
2:09
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie could you also take this one from Jonathan?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:09 Nirvi Shah
2:09
[Comment From Jonathan WernerJonathan Werner: ] 
We are feeling as though we could use some RTI Professional development. We are in Maine, on our 3rd year. Yet we're not feeling as though we look that different than we did in Year 1. Suggestions? Is Prof Dev even a good next step or are there alternatives?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:09 Jonathan Werner
2:10
Katie Tackett: 
Charlene - you are right that the 80-15-5 percentage you see in most models are not based in research. They are broad suggestion based on public health.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:10 Katie Tackett
2:10
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, how would you respond to this?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:10 Nirvi Shah
2:10
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
How many people does it take to implement RTI? This isn't something that one teacher can do, is it?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:10 MoOzarks
2:11
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, what would you say to Ed?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:11 Nirvi Shah
2:11
[Comment From EdEd: ] 
I've heard of several "horror stories" with RtI implementation from teachers who feel underprepared to participate effectively in an RtI process, or the reverse - young teachers coming out of prep programs fully trained in RtI, only to come to work for building and district admins who don't understand the process of RtI, or who are under-resourcing RtI, especially at the Tier II level. Do you think the 2004 inclusion of RtI in the IDEIA regulation prematurely pushed districts toward the process who were unready, and possibly souring what could have been an effective process had a more smooth transition occured?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:11 Ed
2:11
Katie Tackett: 
Jonathan - it sounds like you all could use a self-assessment to determine where you are, what progress you have made, and where you want to go. NCRTI will be releasing a rubric in the next couple of months that could assist with this. In the meantime, several states have produced these. Colorado comes to mind first - it is posted on our state database (www.rti4success.org).
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:11 Katie Tackett
2:11
Darren Woodruff: 
Regarding Charlene's question . . . the 80/15/5 model is a broad suggestion as Katie states. But we do emphasize the importance of a school's core curriculum meeting the needs of the majority of students.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:11 Darren Woodruff
2:12
David Putnam: 
Gene--

Tiered intervention models are used to improve student behavior and academiic achievement. Efforts to improve achievement have focsued most widely on literacty to date. Response to Intervnetion employs tiered instruction and intervention to imrpove the achievment of ALL students, and can be used as an assessment measure for identifyinf students with SLD.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 David Putnam
2:12
Darren Woodruff: 
If it doesn't the school should examine it's curriculum for areas of improvement.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 Darren Woodruff
2:12
Nirvi Shah: 
And David, is RTI a schoolwide effort, like Elaine is hopeful it can be?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 Nirvi Shah
2:12
[Comment From Elaine BernstorfElaine Bernstorf: ] 
How can special subject teachers (arts, physical education, etc) become valuable stakeholders in the RIT movement? Many times these teachers notice student perception and skill problems and make adjustments and accomodations for students but that information may or may not flow into the documentation process.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 Elaine Bernstorf
2:12
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie here's one for you from Jeannie:
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 Nirvi Shah
2:12
[Comment From JeannieJeannie: ] 
What is the best source for applicable multitiered behavioral instruction? (RtI for behaviors) Ideas that teachers can realistically implement in their classrooms, and increases in intensity.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:12 Jeannie
2:13
Katie Tackett: 
Ed - my own personal take is that I'm glad that IDEA 04 didn't mandate RTI as we have all seen what happens when things get mandated. IDEA 04 permitted the use of RTI in LD identification issues to help avoid situations like the one that you described. We urge that schools, districts, and states take a prolonged approach to implementing RTI. Full implementation is a process that, on average, takes 3 - 5 years.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:13 Katie Tackett
2:14
[Comment From Gene RampenthalGene Rampenthal: ] 
Your answer to my question seems to ignore the progress monitoring aspect of RTI. True RTI can be used beyond merely identifying those with learning disabilities and is useful for other children as well, those who are not in a special education program. We need more in depth answers.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:14 Gene Rampenthal
2:14
Nirvi Shah: 
David, Gene has a follow up question for you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:14 Nirvi Shah
2:14
Nirvi Shah: 
(see above!)
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:14 Nirvi Shah
2:15
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, could you tackle this one from Maureen?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:15 Nirvi Shah
2:15
[Comment From MaureenMaureen: ] 
Do you know of any good research that has been conducted in high school(s)?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:15 Maureen
2:15
Katie Tackett: 
Jeannie, I would look at the PBIS website (www.pbis.org) for information regarding behavior interventions. PBIS is essentially the application of the RTI framework to behavior.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:15 Katie Tackett
2:15
Nirvi Shah: 
It might also help answer this question from Anne.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:15 Nirvi Shah
2:15
[Comment From AnneAnne: ] 
Are there many scientifcally research based interventions available? How do school systems know that which are "approved" or validated? How are teachers trained to use them?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:15 Anne
2:16
David Putnam: 
Hi Crystal--

RTI for Math or other subject areas requires a strong core as the foundation of instruction. Interventions build on that core. A great source of instructional strategies that can be used for interventions with struggling learners is the Math document found on the What Works Clearing house site on IES. As for assessments, one commonly used source that has screening and progress monitoring tools for that at the MS level is AIMSweb.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:16 David Putnam
2:16
Nirvi Shah: 
David, could you answer this question from Chastity?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:16 Nirvi Shah
2:16
[Comment From ChastityChastity: ] 
We have implemented many of the strategies in the RTI model at our high school this year after attending the summer training in Boston. We have had great success with our interventions for the majority of our students however, there is a small percentage of intentional non-learners that have not responded to either tier one or tier two interventions. Does the internvention model look different for these types of students? What would an intervention model look like for intentional non-learners? In particluar, we are wondering about tier three for these students? Any feedback would be appreciated. Thank you!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:16 Chastity
2:17
Darren Woodruff: 
Maureen, much of the research on RTI has been done in the primary grades. Our Center is currently working with the National HS Center to get more information on effective practices at the HS level.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:17 Darren Woodruff
2:17
Katie Tackett: 
NCRTI has an instructional tools chart on our website (along with a User's guide) that provides information on interventions appropriate for secondary prevention - a kind of consumer's report for interventions. I would also look at the Doing What Works website for information on specific programs
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:17 Katie Tackett
2:17
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren can you help Carolyn?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:17 Nirvi Shah
2:17
[Comment From Carolyn PimentelCarolyn Pimentel: ] 
I am a School Psychologist and I see our school focusing on Tier 1 - Good instruction for everyone, but feeling lost about how to implement Tier 2, especially with Academic Interventions.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:17 Carolyn Pimentel
2:18
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, what would you say to this from Kevin?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:18 Nirvi Shah
2:18
[Comment From Kevin L.Kevin L.: ] 
How do you convince teachers that in an RtI system the "bell curve" is no longer valid. That you can't just have the attitute that a certain number of kids are expected to fail?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:18 Kevin L.
2:18
Katie Tackett: 
Maureen, NCRTI, the National High School Center, and the Center on Instruction co-authored a resource on the implementation of RTI in high schools. It may be helpful to you. It is available on our website. www.rti4success.org
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:18 Katie Tackett
2:19
Darren Woodruff: 
Hi Carolyn, check out our website (www.rti4success.org). We have a technical review section on reading and math interventions that should be helpful to you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:19 Darren Woodruff
2:19
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, what would you say to parents, like Judy wonders?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:19 Nirvi Shah
2:19
[Comment From JudyJudy: ] 
I have heard some parents be concerned that their children who need particular services and supports will not get them if a school uses an RTI framework - do have data to suggest that this is not the case?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:19 Judy
2:20
Nirvi Shah: 
Your answer might also help with Cornelle's concern.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:20 Nirvi Shah
2:20
[Comment From Cornelle MaxfieldCornelle Maxfield: ] 
I am a parent and a SAC member. What kinds of reporting structures exist for Schools to report to Districts and Parents on the specific practices and results of their RTI implementation?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:20 Cornelle Maxfield
2:20
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, Liz makes an interesting point. What do you say?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:20 Nirvi Shah
2:20
[Comment From LizLiz: ] 
What about interventions like Success for All? Highly-specified and showing significant increases in student achievement?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:20 Liz
2:21
Katie Tackett: 
Kevin - that's a tough question. RTI requires a paradigm shift among all school staff that all kids can learn and that it is a school's responsibility to teach them. Some schools have found that using data is particularly powerful in sharing that the status quo isn't working. This culture shift is important to ensuring that RTI is successful when implemented.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:21 Katie Tackett
2:21
Darren Woodruff: 
Good question, Kevin. I think a good first step would be to get all of the stakeholders in the schools--teachers, parents, administrators--talking about their goals and expectations for the students.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:21 Darren Woodruff
2:21
[Comment From Timothy DalyTimothy Daly: ] 
Any talk of funding for RtI work in the ESEA reauthorization?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:21 Timothy Daly
2:21
Nirvi Shah: 
Do any of you know the answer to Timothy's question?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:21 Nirvi Shah
2:22
Darren Woodruff: 
Tim, we certainly hope there will be funding for RTI in the reauthorization. I think we're just starting to see the potential of RTI for improving student outcomes.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:22 Darren Woodruff
2:22
Nirvi Shah: 
Timothy, my colleague Alyson Klein, who covers Congress here at Ed Week, said "Some school districts definitely want to try out RTI as a possible intervention for certain subgroups in the lowest performing schools. And in a recent conference call with reporters, Sen. Michael Bennet said he wanted to cut the red tape that makes it tough for districts to spend Title I dollars on RTI."
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:22 Nirvi Shah
2:23
David Putnam: 
Elaine--

You are right that special subject area teachers have lots to offer in terms of their observations and insights about students. RTI typically focuses on reading, and in some places math and writing as well, depending ont he district and the level of development. The meetings and decision making at the initial levels of intervention are typically very focused on data and interventions specific top those areas. However, it is important that there be a forum--i.e., grade level meetings, where other aspects of student functioning and need are discussed and that may be a place for input from specials. Also, a wider range of information is used for problem solving at the Tier III level of intervention that would incorporate input from a wide range of sources.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:23 David Putnam
2:23
Katie Tackett: 
Judy, the Office of Special Education Programs recently released a memo clarifying that RTI is not meant to delay evaluation and identification. Schools are - hopefully - getting that message. For schools using RTI well, students are receiving supports and services as soon as the data indicates that the student needs extra help. This is in direct contrast to the traditional model of identification where students may not receive support until the evaluation is completed and an IEP meeting can be held.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:23 Katie Tackett
2:23
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, what do you say to Aguatin?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:23 Nirvi Shah
2:23
[Comment From Agustin TristanAgustin Tristan: ] 
What is the advantage to use RTI versus more traditional tutorial work face to face?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:23 Agustin Tristan
2:24
Nirvi Shah: 
David, Crystal suggests this. Can you share your thoughts?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:24 Nirvi Shah
2:24
[Comment From CrystalCrystal: ] 
David, One website that is inexpensive is www.ixl.com which is based on standards for each state. When you sign up, you put in that information. Offers quite a bit of PM, but baseline is difficult.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:24 Crystal
2:24
Katie Tackett: 
Cornelle, we are currently working on some resources to assist schools with how to keep parents informed about and involved in RTI. We are also hoping to do some "snapshots" about schools that are doing this well.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:24 Katie Tackett
2:24
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie you may have suggested some ideas already. But could you repeat them for Bernice?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:24 Nirvi Shah
2:24
[Comment From BerniceBernice: ] 
We are going to be implementing RTI and PBIS next year. Do you know of any researched based literacy programs?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:24 Bernice
2:25
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, I think this is an important question from Betty
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:25 Nirvi Shah
2:25
[Comment From Betty Betty : ] 
I am a little late joining the webinar. How do you suggest I our Special Education Department that RTI is an intervention tht the school district should invest in not only for our SPED children, but also our general ed. students?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:25 Betty
2:25
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren this might be another one for you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:25 Nirvi Shah
2:25
[Comment From Ed Ed : ] 
What does the research show about RtI implementations in which the needs of ALL children are served first through Tiered service delivery, including kids who may eventually qualify as Autistic or Intellectually Disabled? Another side of this question - is it appropriate for a district to expect teachers/staff to go through a full RtI process with a child before considering him/her for services in non-SLD categories such as Autism, Intellectually Disabled, OHI, etc., given that RtI is listed in federal regulations as an option for special education identification in the SLD category?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:25 Ed
2:26
Katie Tackett: 
Aguatin, RTI can incorporate traditional tutoring. RTI is a framework about delivering services and support to students as opposed to a particular intervention or program.In the RTI framework, tutoring could be offered as a primary, secondary, or tertiary level of prevention for those students who need the support as evidenced by the data.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:26 Katie Tackett
2:26
David Putnam: 
Hi Gene--

I agree completely! That is why I used caps for ALL students. Yes, this is what I refer to as BIG RTI--used for improving instruction for all, screening all students, providing increasingly intensive interventions for students and progress monitoring as you say. Its only for the minority of students does it get use for LD decision making.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:26 David Putnam
2:27
Nirvi Shah: 
David, what say you to Anne?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:27 Nirvi Shah
2:27
[Comment From AnneAnne: ] 
RTI alone is not sufficient to determine that a student has or doesn't have a learning disability. Unfortunately, I see a number of states that are using ONLY RTI to identify LD. Any ideas why this is being done? Is it only a reading of the regulations that will cut costs in LD identification and reduce provision of special education services.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:27 Anne
2:27
Nirvi Shah: 
Crystal, you should share this with lawmakers!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:27 Nirvi Shah
2:27
[Comment From CrystalCrystal: ] 
I am a licensed teacher and work with 6, 7, and 8 grade students. They are assigned my classroom. RTI ELA/READING or RTI Math. I teach 5 sessions a day, 3 RTI ELA/READING and 2 RTI Math. I make $15 an hour, work 8-10 hours a day, no benefits and they are lookin at doing away with my program, due to funding. I hope funding comes through especially when this is something recognized at the federal level.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:27 Crystal
2:28
Katie Tackett: 
Bernice, I'd visit the Doing What Works website. NCRTI has also released an instructional tools chart, focusing on programs appropriate for secondary interventions in math and literacy. It is a Consumer Reports-like chart and is available along with a user's guide on our website (www.rti4success.org) under Tools.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 Katie Tackett
2:28
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, good question from MoOzarks.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 Nirvi Shah
2:28
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
How does one know if RTI is right for their school?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 MoOzarks
2:28
Darren Woodruff: 
Thanks Betty. The National Center approach to RTI emphasizes that it is a framework for ALL students, not just those with disabilities. I'd suggest bringing your gen ed folks into the conversation and in particular discuss using RTI for students that are underperforming in the gen ed classroom.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 Darren Woodruff
2:28
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, I think this one's for you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 Nirvi Shah
2:28
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
How would you set up a RTI program at the high school level that would address ELL students, special education and gifted and talented students.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:28 Guest
2:29
Katie Tackett: 
MoOzarks, I would start by looking at your data. Are all students making sufficient progress from year to year? If yes, then you probably don't need to change what you are doing. If not, it may be time to look into different ways to structure how you provide supports and services to students.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:29 Katie Tackett
2:29
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, can you answer this question about students learning English -- where does RTI fit in?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:29 Nirvi Shah
2:29
[Comment From Mariel Gomez de la TorreMariel Gomez de la Torre: ] 
How can we help ESL students to achieve reading skills faster?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:29 Mariel Gomez de la Torre
2:30
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, could you answer this question from Gene?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:30 Nirvi Shah
2:30
[Comment From Gene RampenthalGene Rampenthal: ] 
What are these other "tiered intervention" models? How are they different from RTI and, how and how often are the results of these interventions measured to verify if there has indeed been progress?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:30 Gene Rampenthal
2:30
Nirvi Shah: 
David, a follow up question from Elaine.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:30 Nirvi Shah
2:31
[Comment From ElaineElaine: ] 
Thanks for your response. As an SLP and music educator I know that literacy is critical for student success but that literacy interventions can be addressed across the curriculum and that sometimes students respond to "
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:31 Elaine
2:31
[Comment From ElaineElaine: ] 
Sorry-- respond differently in different settings. What might be a good first resource for those of us who are training arts educators?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:31 Elaine
2:31
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, one for you from Timothy.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:31 Nirvi Shah
2:31
[Comment From Timothy DalyTimothy Daly: ] 
Recent report points out that there is a lack of "RtI Research" out there. Isn't that the result of the general body of school improvement research making RtI as a service delivery philosophy a "no-brainer"?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:31 Timothy Daly
2:31
Katie Tackett: 
Mariel, good question. RTI is framework for all students, including English Language Learners. It isn't a different model for ELLs. There are, of course, some additional precautions you want to take in implementing RTI with ELLs as many tools (screening, progress monitoring measures, and instructional programs) haven't been validated on ELLs. We will be releasing a resource on screening/progress monitoring and considerations for ELLS any day now.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:31 Katie Tackett
2:32
David Putnam: 
Hi Chastity--
You experience is probably typical in that the lower tiers of intervention work for most but not all students. We combine our academic and behavioral efforts/teaming/intervention planning with student and try to priovide behavioral support at the same time. Student that are resistent/non-responders, for whatever reason, move to what we refer to as Tier III or "Problem Solving". At that point we take a very close and individualized look at the student and their environment, history, etc. and provide more individualized supports. That is where we would address intentional non learners more intensively.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:32 David Putnam
2:32
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, can you answer this question from Agustin? (Did I mistakenly call you Aguatin earlier? I'm sorry!)
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:32 Nirvi Shah
2:32
[Comment From Agustin TristanAgustin Tristan: ] 
Does it exist a learning taxonomy for RTI? other known taxonomies such as Bloom's or Marzano's or Krathwohl's etc. may be used?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:32 Agustin Tristan
2:33
Darren Woodruff: 
Hi Ed. As Katie mentioned ealier, the Office of Special Education Programs recently released a memo clarifying that RTI is not meant to delay evaluation and identification. Students can be evaluated for a disability at any point in the RTI process. It shouldn't be used as a reason for delaying identifcation.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:33 Darren Woodruff
2:33
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, a thank you from Betty.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:33 Nirvi Shah
2:33
[Comment From BettyBetty: ] 
Thanks Darren. I will work on it. It is tough sometimes to initiate change but the information I gain here will be helpful.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:33 Betty
2:34
Katie Tackett: 
Agustin, there isn't a learning taxonomy for RTI. Think of RTI as a framework for how you allocate resources in terms of staff, interventions, support, etc. Any taxonomy can be used.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:34 Katie Tackett
2:34
Darren Woodruff: 
Thank you Betty. Feel free to contact me at dwoodruff@air.org for more info on how we can support your work.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:34 Darren Woodruff
2:34
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, could you answer Luciana's question?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:34 Nirvi Shah
2:34
[Comment From Luciana GlazierLuciana Glazier: ] 
Specialized assessments may in fact facilitate the process of identifying which remedial interventions should be implemented in addition to or instead of more restrictive educational interventions. I want your comment on this (in my view) false opposition between "traditional" assessments and RTI. Thanks!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:34 Luciana Glazier
2:35
David Putnam: 
Crystal--Thanks for the info on that website. I am not familiar with it but will check it out.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:35 David Putnam
2:36
Nirvi Shah: 
David, from Sharon. She's referring to Professional Learnng Teams at high schools.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Nirvi Shah
2:36
[Comment From Sharon KeehnerSharon Keehner: ] 
PLC would be the perfect place to use this framework to raise scores? How should you organize the Professional Learning teams by subject or grade level?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Sharon Keehner
2:36
Nirvi Shah: 
A grateful Agustin, Katie.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Nirvi Shah
2:36
[Comment From Agustin TristanAgustin Tristan: ] 
Thank you Katie, I shall read the complete reference and try to make an application.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Agustin Tristan
2:36
Katie Tackett: 
Luciana, I'm not clear on what you are referring to as "specialized assessments." RTI relies on the integration of instruction and assessment; assessment data is used just in the way you described - to facilitate the process of identifying who needs what.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Katie Tackett
2:36
Darren Woodruff: 
Tim - RTI is definitely not a "no brainer" approach to school improvement. There are a lot of moving parts and we're tying to help schools get the best information and training on how to do it all well.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Darren Woodruff
2:36
Nirvi Shah: 
Interesting question from Gene. Darren, would you reply?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Nirvi Shah
2:36
[Comment From Gene RampenthalGene Rampenthal: ] 
What work has been done regarding RTI for gifted students? Are there any reports available on this topic?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:36 Gene Rampenthal
2:38
Nirvi Shah: 
David, where does RTI connect with some of the things SJS mentions?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:38 Nirvi Shah
2:38
[Comment From SJSSJS: ] 
I don't know how helpful this comment is, but as someone completely new to the language and theory and research behind RTI, it strikes me that the work being done by "All Kinds of Minds" (http://allkindsofminds.org/) and Alice Thomas (http://cdl.org/) will provide a lot of research and specific strategies for the various areas of student learning struggles that are coming up here. I apologize if this is off topic, but it seemed appropriate to point out (if others don't know about the neurodevelopmental work of Alice Thomas and Mel Levine and their respective organizations--It has been transformational in my own work).
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:38 SJS
2:39
Nirvi Shah: 
So Katie, are there assessments for behavior as a part of RTI, as MoOzarks wonders?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:39 Nirvi Shah
2:39
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
What assessments and interventions are used for the behavioral aspects of students?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:39 MoOzarks
2:39
Darren Woodruff: 
Gene, the focus has been on interventions for struggling learners. But the core curriculum (aka Tier 1) should incorporate differentiation to ensure that instruction and assessment are flexible enough to identify and accommodate the needs of advanced learners.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:39 Darren Woodruff
2:39
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, I think I can guess a little of what you'll say to Timothy, but please reply.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:39 Nirvi Shah
2:39
[Comment From Timothy DalyTimothy Daly: ] 
In Ed Week's recent "Special report" on RtI, one of the contributors pointed at a lack of evidence that "RtI is effective". Does there need to be research on this? Isn't the research into school effectiveness generally sufficient for the academic community to accept RtI as best practice?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:39 Timothy Daly
2:40
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, another question from MoOzarks.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:40 Nirvi Shah
2:40
Katie Tackett: 
MoOzarks, typically PBIS uses number of office discipline referrals as a way to screen and monitor students' progress. For more specific information on behavior interventions and tools, I'd visit www.pbis.org.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:40 Katie Tackett
2:40
[Comment From RobinRobin: ] 
Struggling at the HS to define Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions. Feel HS wants to move up the levels much quicker than elementary. Any ideas about what would constitute a Tier 3 at the HS?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:40 Robin
2:40
David Putnam: 
Hi Anne--

Using RTI for identification of SLD also requires a "Comprehensive Assessment". Providing a solid researched based core and increasingly intensive interventions is a big part of that, but once there is a referal and decison to assess, then there is an analysis of existing information and decision regarding what additional asssessment is need for a comprehensive evaluation. Implementing RTI well is neither easy or inexpensive, so I don't see it as a cost-cutting measure but as a way to try to improve instruction for all students and provide a solid foundation for LD decision making.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:40 David Putnam
2:41
Nirvi Shah: 
Here it is Katie. I misfired.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:41 Nirvi Shah
2:41
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
Next year I am going to be providing extra help to students in our junior high who need more guidance. I teach Science, but am certified in Language Arts and Math. Where do I start?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:41 MoOzarks
2:41
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, could you help Robin? I published her comment above, but here it is again: Struggling at the HS to define Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions. Feel HS wants t[...]o move up the levels much quicker than elementary. Any ideas about what would constitute a Tier 3 at the HS?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:41 Nirvi Shah
2:42
Darren Woodruff: 
Hi Tim. Our Center is collecting data from states where we work intensively to show the effectiveness of RTI. The benefit of this effort is that the states and districts are taking a comprehensive approach to their implementation.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:42 Darren Woodruff
2:42
Nirvi Shah: 
David, can you share your insights with Kelli?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:42 Nirvi Shah
2:42
[Comment From KelliKelli: ] 
I've noticed that in my Title I school, that our full time Reading Coach is now half time b/c she handles the RtI process, half-time. Is this typical?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:42 Kelli
2:42
Katie Tackett: 
Robin, this is a struggle for many schools. Tertiary interventions at all levels (elem, MS, and HS) need to be based on the needs of the students as much as possible (meaning that standard intervention programs may not work.) At this point, clinical teaching should be provided by highly effective teachers.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:42 Katie Tackett
2:43
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, can you answer Maha's question?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:43 Nirvi Shah
2:43
[Comment From MahaMaha: ] 
Hello, thank you for this session. I have a question regarding “ fidelity”, could you define “ implementing RTI with fidelity” and how it could be measured.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:43 Maha
2:43
Nirvi Shah: 
David, a follow up from Chastity.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:43 Nirvi Shah
2:43
[Comment From ChastityChastity: ] 
Thanks David! Who is involved in the "Problem Solving" stage? What happens if after all that research and data we begin feeling that a student has the ability to learn but is not successful in our public high school setting? What would you recommend at that point?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:43 Chastity
2:44
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, could Timothy ask you a follow up question via e-mail later on?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:44 Nirvi Shah
2:44
[Comment From Timothy DalyTimothy Daly: ] 
Can I e-mail Darren a follow-up offline?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:44 Timothy Daly
2:44
Katie Tackett: 
MoOzarks, I'm biased because my background is in reading! I would look at the data and see where students are struggling the most - what specific skills are they lacking, etc. You really want to focus on foundational skills. I've also seen a lot of middle/junior high schools use some time in secondary interventions to help pre-teach or re-teach content that students need to access the general ed curriculum.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:44 Katie Tackett
2:44
[Comment From Cornelle MaxfieldCornelle Maxfield: ] 
This is an excellent forum. I'm sorry that I have to leave. Perhaps future discussions could be held at a time more convenient to teachers and working parents. Will a transcript of the discussion be available to the participants?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:44 Cornelle Maxfield
2:44
Nirvi Shah: 
Hi Cornelle. Indeed, we will publish a transcript of the chat online at edweek.org soon!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:44 Nirvi Shah
2:45
David Putnam: 
Elaine--

You raise a good point about literacy across the curriculum that I failed to mention. We work on providing support through our literacry specialist to all teachers so that literacy can be supported widely. As for a good source for literacy in the arts specifically, not sure off the top of my head...
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:45 David Putnam
2:45
Darren Woodruff: 
Robin, for tier 3 at the HS level I'd focus on individualization of supports. Is the goal graduation, vocational training, transition to college? Clearly, the reading and math interventions common in elementary grades won't work for older students.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:45 Darren Woodruff
2:46
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, another question about high school.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Nirvi Shah
2:46
[Comment From MimiMimi: ] 
I do training in my region have struggled with applying RtI to HS / MS... I have used the Doing What Works and RTI Action Network websites as well as the High School: Lessons Learned document for these groups and still been met with MUCH frustration. Is there any other info out to help MS/HS get a grip on the HOW of implementation?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Mimi
2:46
Darren Woodruff: 
Tim - absolutely. I'm at dwoodruff@air.org.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Darren Woodruff
2:46
Katie Tackett: 
Maha, at NCRTI, we talk about ensuring that your RTI framework is implemented with integrity. This goes beyond ensuring that the interventions are delivered with fidelity to the publisher's guidelines. It includes making sure that assessments are administered as designed, cut points are established and followed, processes and procedures are followed, etc.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Katie Tackett
2:46
Nirvi Shah: 
Ah, where reality meets RTI. Darren, a follow up for you from Ed:
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Nirvi Shah
2:46
[Comment From EdEd: ] 
Thanks for your feedback! What would you suggest for a teacher at the bottom of the totem poll stuck underneath building and district admins who are pushing inappropriate components of RtI - delaying evaluations, underfunding Tier II supports while mandating them, using RtI as a judgement block for teachers rather than as a resource for problem-solving, etc.? Given the politics in many situations, is there somewhere they can turn to help improve things in their district without "going over the heads" of folks? Or, should they look for a job in a more progressive district?!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:46 Ed
2:47
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, another question about getting everyone involved in RTI.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:47 Nirvi Shah
2:47
[Comment From Sandy JenkinsSandy Jenkins: ] 
How do you see the role of the school librarian in RtI?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:47 Sandy Jenkins
2:48
Nirvi Shah: 
David, Elaine clarifies her question for you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:48 Nirvi Shah
2:48
[Comment From ElaineElaine: ] 
I'm sorry--my question was not clear. I actually have some good resources for literacy in the arts--I'm asking what might be a good resource about RTI that would be very generic so that arts teachers would understand RTI better.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:48 Elaine
2:49
Katie Tackett: 
Sandy, I think there are many ways for the school librarian to be involved in RTI. I have seen schools use the librarians to assist with interventions (assuming they are trained), serve on school leadership teams, serve on data teams, etc. RTI is for all students, and therefore all staff should be involved.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:49 Katie Tackett
2:49
Nirvi Shah: 
This is an important question from MoOzarks, Katie. Could you answer?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:49 Nirvi Shah
2:49
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
How does one remove a student from regular classroom instruction (where state skills are being addressed daily) to teach-reteach foundational skills? Won't test scores continue to be low if the student is missing required instruction on mandated state skills for his/her grade level?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:49 MoOzarks
2:50
Darren Woodruff: 
Hi Mimi. We are still working on supports at the MS/HS levels. One RTI implementation resource you should check out though was co-authored by NCRTI, the National High School Center, and the Center on Instruction. It is available on our website: www.rti4success.org
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:50 Darren Woodruff
2:50
Nirvi Shah: 
A thank you, Katie.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:50 Nirvi Shah
2:50
[Comment From MahaMaha: ] 
Thank you, Katie, for your feedback!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:50 Maha
2:51
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, can you answer Anne Marie?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:51 Nirvi Shah
2:51
[Comment From Anne MarieAnne Marie: ] 
I understand that in theory that Special Education and RTI specialists are supposed to work together to help all the children. However, do you find that when implementing RTi into schools that there is a lack of clarity as to who is supposed to provide which service?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:51 Anne Marie
2:51
Nirvi Shah: 
A tip from Jenna:
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:51 Nirvi Shah
2:51
Katie Tackett: 
MoOZarks. Excellent question. Secondary interventions are meant to support, not supplant, what is going on in the primary level (e.g., Tier 1/the gen ed classroom.) See the "Practices and Perspectives of 5 Schools" document available from the Center on Instruction to see how 5 schools scheduled these times.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:51 Katie Tackett
2:51
[Comment From JennaJenna: ] 
I don't know if this helps anyone, but I met a company at an AT conference that provides free software for OTs, SLPs and those who do assessments/evaluations. They gave me a free license of wordQ speakQ and will probably do the same for others if interested.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:51 Jenna
2:52
Nirvi Shah: 
Oh, here it is:
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:52 Nirvi Shah
2:52
Nirvi Shah: 
Or there it was!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:52 Nirvi Shah
2:52
David Putnam: 
Hey Sharon--How you organize PLC and/or RTI teams at the secopndary level is complicated--as is much of this work at the secondary level! It really depends on the purpose and work you are you are referring to. Our RTI teams are organized differently across our secondary schools based on building needs and other organizational variables. For a PLC that is developing CFAs and tayloring instriuction, one would need to be grade and subject level specific.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:52 David Putnam
2:53
Katie Tackett: 
Mimi, we are also in the final stages of producing some middle schools specific resources. They should be out on our website (www.rti4success.org) soon. In addition, our next archived webinar for the month of April is on middle school RTI. I suggest you check it out when it goes online shortly. Sign up for our newsletter for an email about it.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:53 Katie Tackett
2:53
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, more from Mimi.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:53 Nirvi Shah
2:53
[Comment From MimiMimi: ] 
Just a worry... just got off the phone with a parent re: district using RTI to avoid evaluation. She was very frustrated and now distrustful of the whole thing. Message = we need to make sure district aren't abusing this!! If our parents aren't on board, we are sunk. :-)
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:53 Mimi
2:53
Darren Woodruff: 
Thanks Ed. You might start a "best practices" conversation by sharing some of the RTI resources (take a look at "Essential Components of RTI") we have on our website: www.rti4success.org. Good luck!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:53 Darren Woodruff
2:54
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, can you answer Maha?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:54 Nirvi Shah
2:54
[Comment From MahaMaha: ] 
Do you think that RTI process is enough to identify students with LD? If no what can be used along with RTI in order to have an accurate identification process?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:54 Maha
2:54
Nirvi Shah: 
David, an observation from Anne.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:54 Nirvi Shah
2:54
[Comment From AnneAnne: ] 
Thanks, David. Your description is how RTI "should" be done. Anecdotal reports I have seen indicate that in some states an adequate "comprehensive assessment" is not indicated nor put into place in identifying learning disabilities. RTI alone is used. This causes concern among those of us who advocate for students with learning disabilities.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:54 Anne
2:54
Katie Tackett: 
Anne Marie, I have seen that. Leadership and thoughtful planning are critical to ensuring that there are clear processes and procedures for implementation.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:54 Katie Tackett
2:55
Nirvi Shah: 
Oh! Katie, can you clarify?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:55 Nirvi Shah
2:55
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
Now I'm getting overwhelmed. I don't know what an AT, QT, SLP, CFA, or PLC is.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:55 MoOzarks
2:55
Nirvi Shah: 
Elaine, one of our fellow chatters has a tip for you.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:55 Nirvi Shah
2:55
[Comment From SuzanneSuzanne: ] 
Elaine, Go to ideapartnership.org. There is a lot of information from national organizations on RTI. Look at the RTI Collection (link on the right side of the page). Info there for folks at all levels of understanding about RTI.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:55 Suzanne
2:56
Katie Tackett: 
Agreed, Mimi. We will be hosting two webinars on RTI and its role in special education eligibility decision hopefully this summer. Join our newsletter at www.rti4success.org to stay informed of when these will be occurring.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:56 Katie Tackett
2:56
Nirvi Shah: 
OK, we're wrapping up soon, so we have time for just a couple more questions.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:56 Nirvi Shah
2:56
Nirvi Shah: 
Katie, for you from Laura. What do you think of the school psychologist being in charge of RTI?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:56 Nirvi Shah
2:56
[Comment From LauraLaura: ] 
I have a comment on a couple of items. First of all, in my district the school psychologist is in charge of RtI...which causes some issues. Also, at my school we provide RtI services during a child's specialist (art,music, pe) time. That way, students are not taken out of the Tier 1 teaching time.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:56 Laura
2:57
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, I think you and Katie mentioned some ideas. Could you reiterate for MoOzarks?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:57 Nirvi Shah
2:57
[Comment From MoOzarksMoOzarks: ] 
How do we find places and dates for introductory workshops - one designed to help us see if RTI is going to work for us?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:57 MoOzarks
2:57
Katie Tackett: 
MoOzarks, I can try and clarify. AT is typically Assistive Technology, SLP is Speech and Language Pathologist. PLC is a Professional Learning Community. And I'm drawing a blank on QT and CFA!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:57 Katie Tackett
2:57
Darren Woodruff: 
Maha, we're actually in the process of working with experts on LD identification from our Center and local districts to develop a webinar on this topic. Check out our newsletter (www.rti4success.org) for info on the presentation.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:57 Darren Woodruff
2:58
Nirvi Shah: 
Darren, can you asnwer this for Timothy? Along the same lines...
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:58 Nirvi Shah
2:58
[Comment From Timothy DalyTimothy Daly: ] 
Any way of bringing RtI people together? I'd love to hear from other practitioners about :Whats working"
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:58 Timothy Daly
2:58
Nirvi Shah: 
David, the last one's for you
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:58 Nirvi Shah
2:59
[Comment From MahaMaha: ] 
How can collage students or educators receive training on RTI?
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:59 Maha
2:59
Nirvi Shah: 
Mimi, Anne knows exactly what you're talking about!
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:59 Nirvi Shah
2:59
[Comment From AnneAnne: ] 
I just saw the comment from Mimi about the parent who is distrustful of RTI because she feels the school district is using it to avoid evaluation. This is the type of anecdotal report I was referencing in my earlier comments.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:59 Anne
2:59
Katie Tackett: 
Laura, leadership is critical. We often advocate for a team to be in charge of making decisions so that all viewpoints can be considered/represented. A parent, a school psych, administrators, specials teachers, general education teacher, special education teacher, ELL specialists, etc. Questions about sustainability arise when one person leads the effort alone.
Thursday March 24, 2011 2:59 Katie Tackett
3:00
David Putnam: 
SJS--Thanks for the thoughtful comment. There are two basic models of RTI: Standard protocol, which incorporate more structured interventions programs in the lower tiers and then often individualized problem solving at Tier three, and Problem Solving, which uses a team to help develop differentiated instruction for students that need more. In both cases the emphasis is on scientifically/research-based strategies for instruction and interventions. Insofar as the sources you mention draw from research based strategies, they may contribute to problem solving and differntiating instruction.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:00 David Putnam
3:00
Nirvi Shah: 
I'm getting many, many thank yous from folks who have submitted questions.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:00 Nirvi Shah
3:00
Darren Woodruff: 
Tim, please check our website (www.rti4success.org) for the webinars and expert chats we schedule regularly.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:00 Darren Woodruff
3:01
Nirvi Shah: 
Laura, more from Elaine.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:01 Nirvi Shah
3:02
[Comment From ElaineElaine: ] 
Laura-- This is a main concern of arts educators--especially music educators. The newest research out of Northwestern and other places shows that music and literacy are tightly connected. Students being pulled out of areas wehre they are learning is devestating to them and their programs.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:02 Elaine
3:02
Nirvi Shah: 
David, Katie, Darren, any last answers out there?
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:02 Nirvi Shah
3:03
Katie Tackett: 
Please visit our website, www.rti4success.org, for more information. In addition, we have an email form and a 1800 number for those of you who have lingering questions! http://www.rti4success.org/index.php?option=com_contact&Itemid=70
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:03 Katie Tackett
3:03
David Putnam: 
Hi Katie--In my experience this is typical. It is (generally) how we structure our elelmentary support. It leaves less time for "coaching" but provides a structure for increasing the efficiency of direct, systematic intervention delivery and a net gain overall.
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:03 David Putnam
3:03
Darren Woodruff: 
Thanks everyone for the great questions!
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:03 Darren Woodruff
3:04
Nirvi Shah: 
Thank you all so much for participating and to the guests for hanging on during this fast-paced session. We at Education Week really appreciate it. For those of you who are interested, we're starting another chat momentarily at http://bit.ly/TechCounts_Chat.

Have a great afternoon!
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:04 Nirvi Shah
3:05
edweekbryan: 
Thanks again to our three experts, our excellent moderator Nirvi, and to all the viewers out there that joined us today. We'll have a transcript of this chat available on edweek.org by COB today.

And if you're still hungry for more education-related live chats, you're in luck! As Nirvi mentioned, you can hop on over to our Tech Counts chat, which just began at 3 p.m. EDT, to find out how schools are using digital tools to personalize learning.
http://www.edweek.org/ew/events/chats/2011/03/24/index.html
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:05 edweekbryan
3:05
edweekbryan: 
Have a great rest of the day, folks!
Thursday March 24, 2011 3:05 edweekbryan
3:09
 

 
 
 

Response to Intervention—In Theory and In Practice


Thursday, March 24, 2011, 2 p.m. EDT
Response to intervention involves early identification of students’ learning problems and the use of focused lessons, or interventions, to address those problems before they became entrenched. Though primarily linked with special education and early reading, the method is now used at all levels of schooling and in a variety of subject areas. Educators use “tiered intervention” models—of which RTI is one type—to improve school discipline. RTI models are also used to improve instruction for English-language learners, with preschoolers, and as a lever for districtwide improvement. In a time of constrained resources, response-to-intervention materials are one of the few areas where school districts are increasing spending. Three practitioners and researchers answered your questions about how RTI works and its effects.

Guests:
David Putnam Jr., Ph.D., director, Oregon Response to Intervention
Darren Woodruff, Ph.D., co-director, National Center on Response to Intervention
Kathryn Tackett, Ph.D., coordinator of state technical assistance, National Center on Response to Intervention

Nirvi Shah, staff writer, Education Week, moderated this chat.


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