Law & Courts

Parents Sue Little League for Allegedly Ignoring Eligibility Concerns

By Bryan Toporek — February 12, 2016 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Parents of former Little League baseball players from Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West squad filed a lawsuit Thursday against Little League International and the local league, according to David Matthews and Mark Konkol of the website DNAinfo, for allegedly electing to ignore potential concerns about players’ eligibility to generate additional revenue.

In February 2015, Little League stripped the Chicago-based squad of the U.S. championship it won at the prior year’s Little League World Series after determining it used players that lived outside of its boundaries. In a statement, the organization said Jackie Robinson West “knowingly expanded its boundaries to include territory that belonged to other leagues in the district” and “used a falsified boundary map” for the competition.

In the lawsuit filed Thursday, former Jackie Robinson West coach Darold Butler and more than a dozen parents of the team’s former players, alleged “Little League was aware of the potential residency issues” of some of the players, “but chose to ignore and/or deliberately conceal these facts in order to garner higher ratings, publicity, and money.” The suit claims Butler submitted each child’s residency documents and a boundary map to Little League, which was “responsible for reviewing and scrutinizing the residency documents with the boundary map, and then confirming the eligibility of each player participating in the tournament.” However, Little League raised no such concerns until a month after the world series concluded.


In mid-December 2014, Little League International’s senior vice president of operations, Pat Wilson, told

the

A version of this news article first appeared in the Schooled in Sports blog.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Law & Courts Texas Attorney General Sues More School Districts That Require Masks
The Texas attorney general's office anticipates filing more lawsuits against districts flouting the governor’s order. Will Dallas be next?
Talia Richman, The Dallas Morning News
4 min read
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks at the Austin Police Association in Austin, Texas, on Sept. 10, 2020.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks at the Austin Police Association in Austin, Texas, on Sept. 10, 2020.
Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP
Law & Courts Can They Do That? Questions Swirl Around COVID-19 School Vaccine Mandates
With at least one large school district adopting a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, here is a look at the legal landscape for such a requirement.
5 min read
Image of a band-aid being placed on the arm.
iStock/Getty
Law & Courts High Court Justice Rejects Student's Bid to Block Removal Over Sexual Harassment Claim
Justice Elena Kagan denied a California student's effort to return to school after his 'emergency' suspension under Title IX regulations.
3 min read
The Supreme Court in Washington as seen on Oct. 7, 2020. After more than a decade in which the Supreme Court moved gradually toward more leniency for minors convicted of murder, the justices have moved the other way. The high court ruled 6-3 Thursday along ideological lines against a Mississippi inmate sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for fatally stabbing his grandfather when the defendant was 15 years old. The case is important because it marks a break with the court’s previous rulings and is evidence of the impact of a newly more conservative court.
The U.S. Supreme Court as seen on Oct. 7, 2020.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Law & Courts Gunmaker Is Seeking School Records of Children Who Died in the Sandy Hook Massacre
Families want a court order to keep subpoenaed school records for five children and four educators who died in the 2012 attack confidential.
Edmund H. Mahony, Hartford Courant
2 min read
A sign is seen outside Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
A sign is seen outside Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
Patrick Raycraft/Hartford Courant via TNS