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New Orleans Schools: Five Years After

Five years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, our discussion examines how the unprecedented, state-led effort to reinvent public education in New Orleans is faring.

Live Chat: New Orleans Schools: Five Years After

Friday, August 27, 12 p.m. Eastern time
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Live Chat: New Orleans Schools: Five Years After

Friday, August 27, 12 p.m. Eastern time
Sign up here to receive an email reminder about this chat.

Teachers await students on the first days of school at the New Orleans Charter Science and Math Academy in New Orleans. —Erika Larsen/Redux for Education Week

As schools open across New Orleans this month, you don’t have to look far for signs of how the public education landscape has changed since Hurricane Katrina struck five years ago. Charter schools, only a small presence before the storm, now serve the majority of public school students. Families have the opportunity to send their children to public schools all over the city under the choice-based system now in place. Our discussion will examine how the unprecedented, state-led effort to reinvent public education in New Orleans is faring five years in, and the challenges ahead.

Guests:
Aesha Rasheed, executive director of the New Orleans Parent Organizing Network, and formerly an education reporter at the New Orleans Times-Picayune
Michael Schwam-Baird, researcher at the Scott S. Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives at Tulane University.
Erik Robelen, assistant editor, Education Week, will moderate this chat.