June 13, 2001

Education Week, Vol. 20, Issue 40
Education Deadlines
A symbol (*) marks deadlines that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.
June 13, 2001
7 min read
School Climate & Safety Out in the Cold
Alaska's struggle to define the state's role in paying for school construction is compounded by the long distances between its communities, and the drastic differences in how its people live.
Alan Richard, June 13, 2001
14 min read
States News in Brief: A State Capitals Roundup
  • Study in Mass. Finds Payoff in Schools Sensitive to Gays
  • N.J. Considers Pre-K Hiring Bonuses
  • New State Board Named in Fla.
  • Ky. Adopts Performance Standards
June 13, 2001
5 min read
Education Administration Eyes New Rules For Blue Ribbon Schools
The popular National Blue Ribbon Schools program run by the Department of Education will survive in its present form—but maybe for just another year.
Alan Richard, June 13, 2001
3 min read
School & District Management City Attorney Elected Mayor Of Los Angeles
City Attorney James K. Hahn sailed to a 9-point victory over one-time teachers' union organizer Antonio Villaraigosa last week to become the next mayor of Los Angeles.
Robert C. Johnston, June 13, 2001
2 min read
School & District Management Leadership

Growing a Journal

Most scholarly journals can't trace their roots to a food co-op where cherries, strawberries, and lettuce were sold. But an upcoming new quarterly on school leadership does.
June 13, 2001
2 min read
Markets Houghton Mifflin Acquisition Extends Industry Trend
Mark Twain, meet Eminem and the Mummy. Houghton Mifflin Co., one of the nation's oldest independent trade and educational book publishers, is being acquired by Vivendi Universal SA, a French media conglomerate with major interests in movies, publishing, video games, and music.
Mark Walsh, June 13, 2001
5 min read
Education Table: Franco-American Education Publisher
Franco-American Education Publisher
Houghton Mifflin Vivendi Universal SA
Founded: 1832, as Ticknor & Fields
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Budget & Finance 'Free Market' in Pa. District Wanes As Edison Buys Rival Company
With three different companies running its 10 schools, the Chester-Upland district was supposed to be Pennsylvania's one-of-a-kind laboratory for free-market competition in education.
Robert C. Johnston, June 13, 2001
3 min read
Education About This Series
This report concludes a two-year examination of leadership issues in education. The series was underwritten by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and in part by the Ford Foundation. Recent articles in the series include:
June 13, 2001
1 min read
School Climate & Safety Town and Country
Urban and rural communities across the country have gone to court in search of more help from their states in constructing and upgrading schools. A look at schools in Alaska and New Jersey shows why. The second of three parts. Includes:
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Federal ESEA Bill on Track As Senate Changes Hands
Although the political shakeup in Washington may pose new challenges for President Bush's overall agenda, it seemed to have little more than a cosmetic effect last week on the Senate debate over his plans for education.
Erik W. Robelen, June 13, 2001
8 min read
School & District Management Bard To Start Public 'Early College' In N.Y.C.
A New York City public high school managed by Bard College will grant graduating students an associate's degree in liberal arts and sciences, instead of a high school diploma.
Karla Scoon Reid, June 13, 2001
2 min read
School & District Management At Delta State U., Principals Find Focus
Thanks to a determined educational administration program at Delta State University, principals in the impoverished Mississippi Delta area are learning to tackle their jobs with better preparation, stronger skills, and greater inspiration.
Alan Richard, June 13, 2001
11 min read
States Urban Renewal
Over the next decade, Newark plans to build 45 new schools and renovate all 30 others. Some see an urban renaissance. Others fear that hopes are too high.
At the ripe old age of 106, Hawthorne Elementary School is a fitting symbol of the widespread deterioration of this city's public schools.
Robert C. Johnston, June 13, 2001
14 min read
Education Federal File

Moore or Less

Doling out billions in federal funding for telecommunications services in thousands of schools and libraries is nothing. Kate L. Moore will now do something really hard: ride herd on a classroom of elementary students.
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Education Capitol Recap
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Nebraska
June 13, 2001
10 min read
Teaching Profession N.Y.C. Principals' Union Takes Issue With Bonus Plan
Only days after New York City officials announced a merit-pay plan for top school leaders, the administrators' union is threatening to sue to stop part of it from taking effect.
Mark Stricherz, June 13, 2001
2 min read
School & District Management Out-of-School Influences On Learning Debated
Sociologist James S. Coleman ignited a national debate in 1966 when he issued a landmark study concluding that differences in children's academic achievement had more to do with background characteristics, such as family wealth, than with anything that went on in schools.
Debra Viadero, June 13, 2001
5 min read
Education News in Brief: A National Roundup
  • Harassment Increasing for Boys AAUW Says
  • Houston Names Superintendent
  • Students Charged in Bus Prank
  • Two Fla. Schools' Rankings Slip
  • Broward Missing Equipment
  • New Orleans Sees Gains
  • School Accountant Charged
June 13, 2001
5 min read
Education Take Note

Back to No. 2 Pencils

Students may think they're cool, but some teachers have had enough of gel pens.
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Education People in the News

Dewayne A. Matthews

The Education Commission of the States has hired Dewayne A. Matthews, the former director of programs and services for the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, to be the organization's vice president for state services. Beginning this month, Mr. Matthews, 50, will coordinate efforts by the ecs to provide services and products to state education officials.
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Education Testing

Buffalo Protest


About 300 teachers in Buffalo, N.Y., have signed a petition calling for an immediate end to the district's social studies and science tests in grades 4 and 8, saying that excessive testing is "causing great harm to our students."
June 13, 2001
2 min read
Education ACT vs. SAT
Some 1 million students took the ACT college-admissions test last year, compared with 1.3 million students who took the SAT test. The ACT dominates in much of the Midwest and West, while the SAT is favored by colleges and universities on the East and West coasts.
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Education Events
June 2001 | July 2001 | August 2001

** marks events that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.

June 13, 2001
34 min read
School & District Management Rural Education
Church and School: Rural high school students who were significantly involved in church activities generally got better grades and were more popular than their less involved counterparts, say researchers who looked at 450 families in north-central Iowa.
June 13, 2001
2 min read
Education Death
James P. Boyle, the president of Ombudsman Educational Services, died May 25 of cancer. He was 65.
June 13, 2001
1 min read
Student Well-Being Sports League To Reconsider School's Rejection
Officials of a Chicago athletic league for Catholic schools plan to reconsider a widely criticized vote denying membership to a predominantly black grammar school on the city's South Side.
John Gehring, June 13, 2001
3 min read
School & District Management Chicago Schools' Chief Executive Will Step Down
Paul G. Vallas' six-year run as the high-profile chief executive officer of the Chicago public schools ended last week with the much-anticipated announcement that he will resign.
Robert C. Johnston, June 13, 2001
2 min read