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Education Opinion

Congress and Your Homework

By Peter Greene — January 14, 2015 4 min read
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Congress must not abdicate its responsibility to help all children succeed.

That’s Arne Duncan, responding to the proposed Lamar Alexander remix of No Child Left Behind. It’s an interesting construction, an inspiring line.

The first picture that popped into my head was an old white guy in a suit, knocking on some family’s front door. When a parent answers, he says, “Hello. I’m Senator Bumswoggle, and I’m here to help Chris study for the big algebra test tomorrow.”

Okay, that’s probably not what Duncan means. But it does raise the question-- what exactly can Congress do to help all children succeed? If we went into classrooms and asked the students, “What do you need from your Congressperson to help you succeed this week?” what would they say?

Would they say that they really, really need to take a bunch of standardized tests? “I think I’m getting better at reading,” will say some bright-eyed eight-year-old, “but until I take a standardized test from Congress, I just don’t know.” Is that what would happen?

Would they say, “Please don’t give any more resources to this school. Instead, give the money to some charter operator to set up a completely different school. Yes, I realize they might not let me go to that school, and I’ll have to stay in this one scraping by with fewer resources, but I’ll sleep better knowing that entrepreneurs have had the opportunity to unleash innovation while making good ROI.”

It is sweet that Duncan and Congress want to help. The desire to help, particularly to help those who are most vulnerable, is a basic human impulse, and a credit to every person who feels it. But the desire to help does not automatically confer the ability to help.

Suppose one of my children is injured and rushed to an operating room. I would want to help. I would want to wave a magic wand and fix it, right now. But if I grab a scalpel and dash into the operating theater declaring, “I really want to help. What can I do?” they would have to throw me out, because as someone with zero surgery-related skills, the most useful thing I can do is get out of the way. Even if I am obscenely rich and incredibly powerful, I still don’t have the skills.

So if Congress’s message to children is going to be, “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help you” the question remains-- what can Congress actually do to help children succeed?

Not teach the children-- neither Congress nor the Department of Education contains barely any people with skills and expertise in actually teaching children. Congress doesn’t know how to build schools or run a sceince fair or assess an essay. Nor would I want to watch a Congressman take a shift or two of lunch duty (okay, I might want to watch a little). With few exceptions, Congresspersons do not know how to do any of the things directly related to helping a child achieve success in school. So they won’t help the children succeed that way.

In fact, Congress doesn’t even know the individual children that it’s talking about. This means that it has no idea what individual strengths and weaknesses the children have. It also means that neither Congress nor Secretary Duncan knows what each individual child means by “succeed.” So the actual working with children is best left up to the people who are right there with them-- teachers and parents.That work includes defining and measuring success; Congress lacks the skills and expertise to do either of those tasks.

Congress does have the expertise to deal with the money and politics portion of the picture. Congress can do its part to make sure that every school has the resources that it needs, and Congress has a responsibility to do that honestly, without damaging fictions such as, “We can fund ten different excellent schools for the same money that’s now spent on just one.” Congress has a responsibility to do its homework, so that it’s not making choices based on the lies in charter school PR materials.

Congress has the expertise and skills to make sure that states do not create funding formulas that treat some children like second-class citizens. Congress has the expertise and skills to require that states and school districts remain transparent.

Neither Congress nor the Department of Education has the expertise and skill to determine when a school is failing or what should be done with that failing school. They have been told that expertise in business, politics and money are sufficient to identify and cure failing schools; this is simply not true, any more than my expertise in teaching English means I belong in an operating room or a board room.

Congress’s responsibility to help children succeed is not a bad measure. But if we’re going to be honest and truthful about the matter, Congress’s ability to help children succeed is nearly non-existent. Great responsibility can come with great power, but in this case, Congress’s most important power is to step back and let the people with expertise, training and skills do their jobs.

The opinions expressed in View From the Cheap Seats are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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