Career Technical Education at a Crossroads

Career and Technical Education at a Crossroads


As they attract a new wave of attention and support in schools across the country, career-and-technical-education programs grapple with new challenges: How should they maintain program quality and weed out career paths that lead students to dead-end jobs? As high-flying programs become popular and more academically rigorous, how can educators ensure that they remain demographically diverse? And how can schools do a better job of getting the word out to all students about all of these new college and career options? Three states—Tennessee, New Jersey, and Arkansas—take on these challenges in this three-part series.








Pruning Dead-End Pathways in Career and Technical Ed.
Quality

Pruning Dead-End Pathways in Career and Technical Ed.

May 10, 2017

Tennessee is working to improve program quality by ensuring that all pathways lead to higher education and jobs in growing fields.








Can a Career Tech Ed. School Be Too Popular?
Equity

Can a Career Tech Ed. School Be Too Popular?

May 17, 2017

Schools like the Marine Academy of Science and Technology worry that their enrollments are becoming less diverse as their academics become more rigorous.








Upcoming Installments


May 31, 2017

The old "vocational education" system too often categorized low-income and minority students as poor college candidates and tracked them into blue-collar jobs. Read about Arkansas’ placement of career coaches in more than half its schools, a move that could circumvent tracking.





Vol. 36, Issue 30