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The Common Core and Individualized Education Programs

Monday, November 25, 2013, 2 to 3 p.m. ET
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 The Common Core and Individualized Education Programs(11/25/2013) 
9:03
Bryan Toporek: 
Good morning, folks, and welcome to today's free live chat, The Common Core and Individualized Education Programs, sponsored by Curriculum Associates. I've just opened today's chat for questions, so please submit any you have below.

We'll be back at 2 p.m. ET with Barbara Van Haren and Carol Kosnitsky. Hope to see you then!
Monday November 25, 2013 9:03 Bryan Toporek
1:57
Bryan Toporek: 
Good afternoon, folks, and welcome to today's free live chat, The Common Core and Individualized Education Programs, sponsored by Curriculum Associates. We'll be underway in just a few minutes. In the meantime, please keep submitting your questions below.
Monday November 25, 2013 1:57 Bryan Toporek
1:59
Bryan Toporek: 
OK, folks, we're ready to get underway. I'm handing the chat over to today's moderator, Christina Samuels. Take it away, Christina!
Monday November 25, 2013 1:59 Bryan Toporek
2:00
Christina Samuels: 
Thanks Bryan, and good afternoon, everyone! We're glad you could join us for this discussion on linking Common Core State Standards and individualized education programs. We’re joined today by two experts who have worked directly with teachers on this topic, Carol Kosnitsky and Barbara Van Haren. I’ll allow them to introduce themselves, and then we’ll dive right into questions!
Monday November 25, 2013 2:00 Christina Samuels
2:00
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Hi - This is Carol - I was a special education director for 20 years and currently provide professional development around the country on special education issues - particularly on providing access to the curriculum and alignment to IEPs.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:00 Carol Kosnitsky
2:00
Barbara Van Haren: 
Thanks Christina. I appreciate the opportunity to participate in today’s LiveChat. I am currently the Director of Special Ed and Pupil Services for Cooperative Education Service Agency #1 located in Southeastern Wisconsin. We provide services to 45 districts and 23 independent charter schools. I also am an ad hoc professor at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. I have been providing professional development in the area of IEP development for over 20 years and most recently concentrating on incorporating CCSS and UDL. I previously served as one of the authors for Wisconsin’s guide to connecting IEPs and academic standards.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:00 Barbara Van Haren
2:01
Christina Samuels: 
There's a lot of great questions here, and I'd like to encourage the audience to continue sending them in.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:01 Christina Samuels
2:01
Christina Samuels: 
We'll start off with a question from Amanda, that I'd like to direct to you, Carol:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:01 Christina Samuels
2:01
[Comment From Amanda ScottAmanda Scott: ] 
Hi, my name is Amanda and I am a middle/high school reading intervention teacher using Fountas & Pinnell's Leveled Literacy Intervention program. I am wondering how I should be incorporating the CCSS. I am particularly concerned about what grade level standards I should be using. If I am teaching a reading intervention group who is made up of seventh grade students but whose instructional level is third grade, should I use third or seventh grade standards? The intervention is being done at their instructional level so in my eyes, I should use third grade standards, but then that might not be seen as "rigorous."
Monday November 25, 2013 2:01 Amanda Scott
2:02
Christina Samuels: 
While Carol is answering that one, here's one for you, Barbara. It's a similar question, so it'll allow you to offer your thoughts. It's from Nancy:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:02 Christina Samuels
2:02
[Comment From Nancy HNancy H: ] 
I teach 7th and 8th grade students reading at least 2+ years below grade level. Most, but not all are on IEPs. I wonder how to balance the standards with their reading levels, comprehension, and vocabulary.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:02 Nancy H
2:03
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Amanda, Great question - The student's present level is at 3rd and instructionally you will focus on the next instructional level as it relates to basic foundational reading skills. You do need to look at the 7th grade standards to determine what other aspects the student needs to address...
Monday November 25, 2013 2:03 Carol Kosnitsky
2:03
Christina Samuels: 
I'm going to toss out a little poll because I'd like to know more about our audience.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:03 Christina Samuels
2:03
Have you taken part in professional development on writing IEP goals linked to common core standards?
Yes
 ( 22% )
No
 ( 78% )

Monday November 25, 2013 2:03 
2:04
Barbara Van Haren: 
That's a very popular question Amanda! I recommend that we begin with the standards from the grade level of placement. Most Students with disabilities are held accountable at their grade level and we should match this with instruction
Monday November 25, 2013 2:04 Barbara Van Haren
2:04
Carol Kosnitsky: 

Amanda - I would look at what supports can be provided to the student so he or she can fully participate in the other aspect of LA such as exposure to literature; determining main ideas, strategies for accessing informational text. etc.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:04 Carol Kosnitsky
2:05
Christina Samuels: 
Here's a question from Elizabeth that I believe both Carol and Barbara can answer.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:05 Christina Samuels
2:05
[Comment From Elizabeth CookeElizabeth Cooke: ] 
How do you help non-readers or students with visual or auditory processing deficits with accessing informational text?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:05 Elizabeth Cooke
2:05
Barbara Van Haren: 
Amanda - I agree with Carol. Its about balancing materials at the students functional level and providing exposure or access to grade level materials.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:05 Barbara Van Haren
2:07
Barbara Van Haren: 
Great question Elizabeth. The principles of universal design for learning can play a big role in removing barriers to accessing grade level materials.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:07 Barbara Van Haren
2:08
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Elizabeth - This is where Universal Design for Learning comes in. The technology that exists today can make a huge difference for non-readers. Text to speech for example. I recommend you look at www.udlcenter.org for great resources.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:08 Carol Kosnitsky
2:09
Barbara Van Haren: 
Elizabeth - I also like www.cast.org and Maryland LearningLinks as UDL resources.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:09 Barbara Van Haren
2:09
Christina Samuels: 
Here's a question from Celia that I'll direct to you, Carol:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:09 Christina Samuels
2:09
[Comment From CeliaCelia: ] 
I think of ccl standards instruction as primary instruction and interventions/supplementary instruction (rr and consultant teacher) as based on gaps and current instructional level, rather than grade level. Is this correct?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:09 Celia
2:10
Christina Samuels: 
Barbara, Steve looks like he's doing some work in his state that is similar to the work that you're doing in Wisconsin. Maybe you have some tips for him:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:10 Christina Samuels
2:10
[Comment From SteveSteve: ] 
I am developing my State's PD Program for Standards-based IEPs. In your experience, what is the most common hurdle that arises with the delivery and implementation of this topic?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:10 Steve
2:12
Barbara Van Haren: 
Thanks for the question Steve - a couple of things come to mind. First, having special educators develop the understanding associated with the CCSS - many general educators are struggling with the complexity of the standards.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:12 Barbara Van Haren
2:12
Barbara Van Haren: 
Secondly, how to select which standards are included in an IEP as there are many available.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:12 Barbara Van Haren
2:13
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Hi Celia - primary or core instruction is definitely based on the Common Core and district curriculum. When looking at support services you look at instructional level for some skills; but you must have a direct path form that level to the grade level standard. All interventions must be related to gr. level standards even if that means the student may not attain the standard in this school year.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:13 Carol Kosnitsky
2:14
Christina Samuels: 
Based on the poll responses thus far, it looks like about two-thirds of our audience has NOT done any PD related to writing standards-based IEPs and the common core. So how are teachers learning about this? Keep sending in your thoughts and questions.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:14 Christina Samuels
2:14
Barbara Van Haren: 
Steve - I also think staff struggle with the gap between grade level and instructional - same questions that came up earlier in this conversation. It is shifting a mindset around developmental skills.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:14 Barbara Van Haren
2:15
Christina Samuels: 
An audience member also wanted to respond to Elizabeth:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:15 Christina Samuels
2:15
[Comment From DanaDana: ] 
Elizabeth- We use Edgenuity digital curriculum for our HS. Highly rigorous and meets the new CC standards. It has text to speech, glossaries, translations, closed captions for lectures etc. The problem I am finding is that even with all these accommodations embedded, the pace of the program, the depth of the vocabulary and the rigor in general makes it extremely challenging for our students with learning disabilities.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:15 Dana
2:15
Carol Kosnitsky: 
The poll does not surprise me. This had been my experience in traveling to many districts. And when there is training, it is often geared directly to the content teacher with little discussion on how to make curr. more accessible.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:15 Carol Kosnitsky
2:15
Barbara Van Haren: 
In response to the poll - it is my hope that special educators are part of a larger CCSS conversation with general educators rather than in isolation.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:15 Barbara Van Haren
2:17
Barbara Van Haren: 
Poll - I always recommend to special educators that they invite themselves to the CCSS discussion occurring at their schools and to bring chocolate!
Monday November 25, 2013 2:17 Barbara Van Haren
2:17
Christina Samuels: 
When I wrote about this topic recently, I also heard educators talking about "unpacking" a standard. Here's a question about this from Jennifer -- Carol, can you field this one?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:17 Christina Samuels
2:17
[Comment From JenniferJennifer: ] 
In our state, we use standards-based IEPs, and require that academic IEP goals be linked to a grade level standard. One thing that teachers struggle with, especially for students with significant learning deficits, is the vertical alignment piece. Do you have any suggestions for helping special educators understand how to unpack the standards and identify the essence of the standard? Often they are being asked to do so when they are not experts in both ELA and math.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:17 Jennifer
2:19
Christina Samuels: 
Barbara, a good q from Lorri:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:19 Christina Samuels
2:19
[Comment From LorriLorri: ] 
IEP annual goals are supposed to be written so that they can be achieved in one year of instruction and services. So I am a little confused - how can we write an annual goal that may need more time to be accomplished?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:19 Lorri
2:20
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Jennifer - this is the struggle many folks have. I do believe, in part, this is why collaboration with general ed. is so critical. Sp. Ed. folks should not have to unpack standards separate from their gen. ed. colleagues. That being said, I would first try to access the curr. work done in the district. I would also look at your state resources - many of which have provided great resources on looking at the "essence"...
Monday November 25, 2013 2:20 Carol Kosnitsky
2:21
Barbara Van Haren: 
Thanks for the question Lorri. I believe the answer lies in the intensity of the intervention or service provided to the student.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:21 Barbara Van Haren
2:21
Barbara Van Haren: 
Lorri- the length of time is the constant, but how much service or the degree of intensity is the variable that special educators can change to match the needs of the students.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:21 Barbara Van Haren
2:22
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Jennifer - For example - Mass. has a great resource guide. In addition, the consortia working on alt. assessments have provide great resources as well. Check out which one your state is using. I think it is key to look at the grade standard and use the vertical alignment to find where the student is at. I also think looking at what the depth of knowledge required in the standard is key.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:22 Carol Kosnitsky
2:23
Christina Samuels: 
This is not a question, but a comment, from Dawn. I wonder if our panelists have also found this to be true.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:23 Christina Samuels
2:23
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
I find that teachers try to hard to match the language in the CCS and then they write something that is totally unmeasurable.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:23 Dawn
2:24
Barbara Van Haren: 
Great point Dawn - as special educators we need to remember the "I" in IEP.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:24 Barbara Van Haren
2:25
Carol Kosnitsky: 
I think it's really important to not rely on the "cut and paste" approach to goal writing. People feel pressure to do that, but I think the real alignment is described in the Present level statements - this should describe the skills necessary for the student to move forward with what is challenging AND achievable.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:25 Carol Kosnitsky
2:26
Barbara Van Haren: 
Dawn - once again, capturing the "essence" of the standard is key, but then the skill involved must be incorporated into the annual goal with a level of attainment that will help that student move toward grade level expectations. A standard and IEP goal are not the same!
Monday November 25, 2013 2:26 Barbara Van Haren
2:27
Christina Samuels: 
I just wanted to follow up with some of the latest thoughts -- so, it is okay to create an IEP goal that moves a student forward, even if that student does not make it to grade-level achievement in an academic year? Because that would be a tall order for many students.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:27 Christina Samuels
2:29
Barbara Van Haren: 
Christina - I am aware of districts that are moving toward "one year plus" goals in an effort to close the achievement gap between students with and without disabilties.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:29 Barbara Van Haren
2:29
Carol Kosnitsky: 
I think you begin with the question - what would it take to allow this student to meet a grade level standard. Could an accommodation remove a barrier? What scaffolding is necessary for the student to participate and engage in demonstrating the skill/concept.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:29 Carol Kosnitsky
2:30
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Teachers are learning about this shift whenever they can attend PD. Such PD is sometimes provided only to Gen. Ed. teachers and not to ALL staff.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:30 Guest
2:30
Barbara Van Haren: 
Christina - IEP goals need to move the student forward, recognizing a multiple year gap will present quite the challenge.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:30 Barbara Van Haren
2:30
Christina Samuels: 
Another thought about PD.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:30 Christina Samuels
2:31
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Bit I do believe that some standards are based on skills that are hierarchical and in those cases, I believe moving forward with high expectations may in fact be the viable plan for a student. That said - we need to be careful that we don't get caught up in the thinking that kids can't engage in rich content until they "catch up".
Monday November 25, 2013 2:31 Carol Kosnitsky
2:31
Christina Samuels: 
Barbara, here's a question from Chan about what parents might be able to do to educate themselves on this topic.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:31 Christina Samuels
2:31
[Comment From Chan StromanChan Stroman: ] 
What suggestions or practical tips would you have for parents to (1) educate themselves on the specific common core standards that are pertinent to their student and (2) provide input to the IEP process when the common core standards are not otherwise considered by school members of the IEP as something that should be used as a basis for benchmarking measurable goals in the IEP. This can be a particular concern in states where special education implementation is subject to local control.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:31 Chan Stroman
2:33
Christina Samuels: 
Hmm -- Vicki asks a question I probably should have posted at the beginning! Carol, do you agree with her contention that there's a tension between "individualized" and "standards-based?"
Monday November 25, 2013 2:33 Christina Samuels
2:33
Barbara Van Haren: 
Great comment Chan. There are resources available to parents (Iknow Wisconsin has a CCSS guide for parents on line) so that parents can become more acquainted with the standards.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:33 Barbara Van Haren
2:33
[Comment From VickiVicki: ] 
"Standards based education" and "individual education plans" seem to be oxymorons...
Monday November 25, 2013 2:33 Vicki
2:35
Christina Samuels: 
One of our audience members has another thought for Chan:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:35 Christina Samuels
2:35
Barbara Van Haren: 
Chan - the CCSS should also provide a common language among all educators and family members - parents should be hearing similar discussion at IEP meetings for children with disabilities as they are for their children without disabilities.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:35 Barbara Van Haren
2:35
[Comment From Candace CortiellaCandace Cortiella: ] 
Parents also need help in understanding the "Standards-based approach to IEPs"...we have written a guide for parents on this topic for the National Center for Learning Disabilities. Its available at http://www.ncld.org/learning-disability-resources/ebooks-guides-toolkits/understanding-standards-based-iep
Monday November 25, 2013 2:35 Candace Cortiella
2:36
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Great question Vicki - No I don't think there needs to be. I think standards provide the information we need to prepare students for life after school. That said, the basic tenets of IEPs can live in harmony with standards. I believe we begin with the premise of "why can't a student meet the standrds?" and do our best to remove barriers and set high expectations.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:36 Carol Kosnitsky
2:36
[Comment From Nancy HNancy H: ] 
Carol, really like what you said about students engaging w/rich content. This seems to me to be where accommodations are crucial - to allow that engagement
Monday November 25, 2013 2:36 Nancy H
2:36
Carol Kosnitsky: 
That being said, IEPs must include access to gen. ed, curr. as well as meet students other unique needs. I think both are possible.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:36 Carol Kosnitsky
2:37
Christina Samuels: 
There are good comments coming in in response to the discussion thus far. I'll post a few, then we'll get back to questions.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:37 Christina Samuels
2:37
Barbara Van Haren: 
Vicky - I agree with Carol. perhaps the key is focusing on a student based IEP that is connected or aligned with the standards!
Monday November 25, 2013 2:37 Barbara Van Haren
2:37
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
I don't belive it to be an oxymoron. Not everyone takes the same steps to reach the goal or standard. With students who need special education, it's better to lay the steps out a little closer together and with more detail.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:37 Dawn
2:38
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
The comment from Vicki is a problem that I face every time I am holding an IEP where an advocate/attorney are present. They talk about individualized and we talk about standards-based, and the benchmarks designed to align with the ultimate goal don't seem to satisfy their request for "individualized".
Monday November 25, 2013 2:38 Guest
2:39
Christina Samuels: 
Back to the questions: Meghan has a big-picture question that would be good for both of our guests:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:39 Christina Samuels
2:39
[Comment From MeghanMeghan: ] 
From a policy perspective, do you think that the Common Core will serve special education students better than the system has in the past? Will it hold them to higher standards that will ultimately benefit them? Or might it, instead, hold them to standards that are not attainable or appropriate for all students and therefore lose sight of the "I" in IEP? Do you have any suggestions or considerations for implementation that will allow special education students to be successful and will ensure an appropriately challenging education?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:39 Meghan
2:40
Carol Kosnitsky: 
I think what makes an IEP individualized is telling the right story about the student - their strengths, needs, present levels. Individualization begins with knowing how the student best learns, what supports they need to participate.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:40 Carol Kosnitsky
2:41
Barbara Van Haren: 
Great question Meghan - I do believe that CCSS, along with RTI and UDL offer greater opportunity for stusdents with disabilities to access the general curriculum and to higher level learning.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:41 Barbara Van Haren
2:43
Christina Samuels: 
There are a lot of audience members asking for resources that give specific examples of what we're talking about today. While our panelists are fielding questions, I don't want to ask them to pause for a web search. However, here's one resource, it is dated, from 2007, but it's a start:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:43 Christina Samuels
2:43
Barbara Van Haren: 
Meghan - I recommend creating a balance that allows for continued success on individual goals, but not "waiting" for those developmental skills before providing opportunity to learn higher level thinking skills.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:43 Barbara Van Haren
2:43
Carol Kosnitsky: 
I'd like to think that if implemented well, the CC has the potential to improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Let's not forget, it's really about instruction. I don't think the CCSS in and of themselves will make a difference. I think schools rethinking approaches to instruction will allow the students to access the CC (which I personally like).
Monday November 25, 2013 2:43 Carol Kosnitsky
2:44
Christina Samuels: 
From Project Forum: Standards Based Individualized Education Program examples:
http://nasdse.org/DesktopModules/DNNspot-Store/ProductFiles/36_a7f577f4-20c9-40bf-be79-54fb510f754f.pdf
Monday November 25, 2013 2:44 Christina Samuels
2:45
Christina Samuels: 
Interesting comment from Shelly, that again illustrates the challenges teachers face in this area.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:45 Christina Samuels
2:45
[Comment From Shelly WilhelmiShelly Wilhelmi: ] 
The common core is really all about high quality instruction for all students. The problem occurs when we write IEP goals based solely on the subtests/subskills that can be measured through our district assessments. We create blanket IEP goals in order to make them easily measurable and we lose the essence which is individuality.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:45 Shelly Wilhelmi
2:46
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Another resource folks should check out is www.goalbookapp.com There is a cost, but can be viewed for free. they have combined some great examples of how to write measurable goals based on CC utiliizing the principles of UDL.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:46 Carol Kosnitsky
2:47
Barbara Van Haren: 
That is a challenge Shelly - the standards included on an IEP should be based on disability related needs and include those that will have the greatest impact on the students learning.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:47 Barbara Van Haren
2:47
Christina Samuels: 
Anne has a question I'll direct to Barbara.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:47 Christina Samuels
2:47
[Comment From Anne CanvasserAnne Canvasser: ] 
When you write IEPS with CCSS- is it best to use it for both grades the student will be in because we may hold an IEP in the middle of 7th grade, and the IEP will take students to the middle of 8th grade. Should we have 7th and 8th grade standards on the IEP?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:47 Anne Canvasser
2:48
Barbara Van Haren: 
Carol - glad you brought up Goalbook. We have a number of districts that are using this tool. It is helping special educators connect the IEPs, standards, and uses the principles of UDL.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:48 Barbara Van Haren
2:49
Christina Samuels: 
Interesting question here from Celia. I've written about how standards-based IEPs represent a shift from IEPs that focus on foundational or developmental skills. But is there still a place for foundational skills in the document? Carol, I'll send this to you.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:49 Christina Samuels
2:49
[Comment From CeliaCelia: ] 
What about Foundational Skills? In NY we have state standards for Career Development which include the embedded prerequisites for education - we include these in our consideration of student needs and goal development. Still standards based, just different set of standards.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:49 Celia
2:50
Christina Samuels: 
Some agreement from one audience member:
Monday November 25, 2013 2:50 Christina Samuels
2:50
Barbara Van Haren: 
Anne - the standards are written to reflect what students should know at the end of the year. Regarding an IEP in the middle of year - you would want to consider both when developing annual goals - again capturing the essence of those standards/skills - the progression of the learning that is occuring between 7th and 8th grade.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:50 Barbara Van Haren
2:50
[Comment From George CheungGeorge Cheung: ] 
Comment - Carol stated "I'd like to think that if implemented well, the CC has the potential to improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Let's not forget, it's really about instruction. I don't think the CCSS in and of themselves will make a difference. I think schools rethinking approaches to instruction will allow the students to access the CC (which I personally like)." I definitely agree. The implementation and instruction from the teacher is the key. New paradigm shifts need to occur and the incorporation of 21st century skills and technology need to be at the forefront of this. This is why PD is extremely important to provide and teach tools of the 21st century.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:50 George Cheung
2:53
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Yes, I think foundational skills still have a place - for example the ELA standards for K-5 deal specifically with foundational reading skills, as do the elementary math standards. Student clearly need to learn basic skills - the issue is we can't wait to teach them all the other things we think kids need to know and be able to do until they learn basic skills. When a student can't read efficiently, the student stills to be exposed to all the other content and skills (in other words, kids can learn a lot about science without reading well). We don't stop teaching reading, nor should we not teach him science.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:53 Carol Kosnitsky
2:54
Christina Samuels: 
A audience member named Lisa asked about incorporating arts into IEPs. I'll broaden that and ask both our guests; is it difficult to incorporate subjects OTHER THAN reading and writing into standards-based IEPs? Do they have to be fairly tightly focused on reading and math?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:54 Christina Samuels
2:54
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Developmental skills may also be critical - this is where it is so critical that the team (including child and parent) talk about the long-range vision for the student. This will allow folks to prioritize where instructional time will be allocated.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:54 Carol Kosnitsky
2:55
Barbara Van Haren: 
Celia - I will also share that the impact of listening comprehension and vocabulary building on reading skills is very important. These standards can positively impact other standards and really increase a student's overall performance.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:55 Barbara Van Haren
2:57
Barbara Van Haren: 
Lisa - I believe that an IEP must be written based on disability related needs. CCSS will be incorporated when the needs are in the areas of English/LA or math, but other areas of needs must continue to be addressed in the IEP.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:57 Barbara Van Haren
2:57
Christina Samuels: 
Here's a guest asking about pushback -- I think this is a good one for Carol and Barbara, and I'll expand it to say, if you're seeing pushback, where is it coming from? Principals? teachers? parents? All of the above?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:57 Christina Samuels
2:57
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Have you received any push back because some believe that grade level standards are not reasonably calculated? How have you dealt with this type of push back?
Monday November 25, 2013 2:57 Guest
2:58
Christina Samuels: 
More free resources! Thanks Jim.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:58 Christina Samuels
2:58
[Comment From JimJim: ] 
Christina- If folks are public school teachers in Illinois, there is a free resource for CCSS and IEPs at: https://iepq.education.illinois.edu
Monday November 25, 2013 2:58 Jim
2:58
Barbara Van Haren: 
Lisa - I don't believe that standards based IEPs were ever intended to provide every goal for students or to eliminate goals in the area of functional performance.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:58 Barbara Van Haren
2:58
Carol Kosnitsky: 
With regard to the arts - IEPs don't specifically limit themselves to reading and math. The unified arts are so important for all students. The CCSS do extend to all content in regards to the importance of reading and writing across the disciplines. I think the connection with the arts and IEPS is in making sure students have access to all the programs available students without disabilities. So I wouldn't see an "art" goal per se, rather references as to how to make sure the student can fully participate in art.
Monday November 25, 2013 2:58 Carol Kosnitsky
3:01
Carol Kosnitsky: 
I have heard people question the expectations outlined in the standards especially for K-1. But I think there has been an argument about early education and what young children should be doing long before the CCSS. My response is usually about finding balance. I think there are many things in the standards that provide a lot of flexibility that can get at a lot of CC skills that don't require seat time. For example - Listening and speaking standards.
Monday November 25, 2013 3:01 Carol Kosnitsky
3:01
Barbara Van Haren: 
Comment from guest - I do believe that using grade level standards are creating challenges for special educators, however with the emphasis on results driven accountability and student outcomes not only through the IEP process but also teacher effectiveness - we need to move forward with higher expectations for our students.
Monday November 25, 2013 3:01 Barbara Van Haren
3:02
Christina Samuels: 
This hour went by so quickly! I'd like to thank Barbara and Carol for joining us today. I also wanted to share some links to my recent stories on common core and its intersection with special education.
Common Core’s Promise Collides with IEP Realities: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/10/30/10cc-iep.h33.html

Special Educators Look to Tie IEPs to Common Core http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/12/27/15iep_ep.h30.html

Standards Impact for Special Education is Weighed http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/09/22/04standards.h30.html

Finally, there were so many questions from folks looking for specific examples and resources. I'd like to ask those of you who have examples of good resources to email me at csamuels@epe.org; I'll compile them all into a blog post in the next few days at http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/speced/ Thanks again to all!
Monday November 25, 2013 3:02 Christina Samuels
3:03
Barbara Van Haren: 
Thanks everyone for participating! Great conversations!
Monday November 25, 2013 3:03 Barbara Van Haren
3:03
Carol Kosnitsky: 
Thanks - and happy holidays to all.
Monday November 25, 2013 3:03 Carol Kosnitsky
3:04
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks, Christina! That's a great place to wrap up. Thanks again to Carol and Barbara for joining us today. We'll have a transcript up on this same page later today.

Have a great rest of the week!
Monday November 25, 2013 3:04 Bryan Toporek
3:05
 

 
 
 

The Common Core and Individualized Education Programs

Monday, November 25, 2013, 2 to 3 p.m. ET

The Common Core State Standards mean big changes for teachers of students with disabilities, who face the challenge of providing grade-level content to students with disabilities through individualized education programs (IEPs). Experts Carol Kosnitsky, a New Hampshire-based special education consultant, and Barbara Van Haren, a director of special education in Pewaukee, Wis., have experience working with teachers who are learning how to weave core standards into IEPs. They answered your questions on this vital topic.

Guests:
Carol Kosnitsky, special education consultant
Barbara Van Haren, director of special education and pupil services, Cooperative Educational Service Agency #1, Pewaukee, Wis.

Christina Samuels, staff writer, Education Week, moderated this chat.

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