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A Conversation with Juan Sepúlveda

Thursday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m. Eastern time
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 A Conversation with Juan Sepúlveda(12/16/2010) 
9:35
edweekcraig: 
Good morning folks.
Today's chat, "A Conversation with Juan Sepúlveda" is now open for questions. Please submit these now. Let me know if you have any questions (type in the space below). Cheers.
Thursday December 16, 2010 9:35 edweekcraig
9:36
edweekcraig: 
The chat itself will begin at 2 p.m. Eastern
Thursday December 16, 2010 9:36 edweekcraig
9:38
edweekcraig: 
Today's moderator is Mary Ann Zehr, assistant editor for Education Week. Mary Ann also blogs for EdWeek at the Learning the Language blog, http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/learning-the-language, where you can find her most days!
Thursday December 16, 2010 9:38 edweekcraig
1:57
edweekcraig: 
Thanks for all of the questions submitted so far. We will begin the chat in just a couple of moments. Cheers.
Thursday December 16, 2010 1:57 edweekcraig
2:00
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Hi. Welcome to today's chat about improving education for Hispanic students. With us today is Juan Sepúlveda, the director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. You can read more about the initiative at this link: http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/list/hispanic-initiative/index.html

Juan, what would you like to tell participants about yourself?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:00 Mary Ann Zehr
2:02
juansepulveda: 
Hi everyone, thank you for being here.
A year and a half ago I was appointed by the president to lead the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics, to engage Hispanic parents, students, organizations and communities to become active participants in improving the academic achievement of Hispanics. Prior to my appointment, I led The Common Enterprise, where we focused on building stronger communities by joining organizations, governments, nonprofits and foundations to work together for a common goal.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:02 juansepulveda
2:03
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Let's start with a question about the executive order to improve Hispanic education that President Obama signed in October.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:03 Mary Ann Zehr
2:03
[Comment From Jason CarrJason Carr: ] 
I've read the Executive Order in preparation for the upcoming chat. It strikes me that one could do a search/replace on the text, changing "Hispanic" to a more generic term like "at-risk" and not do damage to the document or the stated goals of the EO. Can the guest please share some thoughts about how this EO brings added value to the overall conversation?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:03 Jason Carr
2:03
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Here's a link to the executive order: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2010/10/19/executive-order-white-house-initiative-educational-excellence-hispanics
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:03 Mary Ann Zehr
2:06
juansepulveda: 
Thank you for your question. Yes, you're correct. There is both, for us and the Obama administration as a whole, a focus on those students who are most at-risk. But, for our office in particular with Latinos being the largest minority group in the public school system at nearly 12 million, it's important for us to target Hispanic students. With this focus we believe we can bring really important lessons from the work we are doing with communities to help Latino students in particular that can help address the larger issues as well.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:06 juansepulveda
2:06
Mary Ann Zehr: 
What has your office accomplished with the executive order since October?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:06 Mary Ann Zehr
2:08
juansepulveda: 
We have continued to develop the public/private partnerships, which are our number one priority, to work directly with communities to develop community-wide education goals and begin strategizing how communities can carry out their vision. We continue to build on our national network, which was formed by visiting more than 100 communities and more than 30 states, DC and PR, where we directly heard from students, parents, teachers, all stakeholders interested in these issues about what we should be doing together to increase the education attainment level of Latino students.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:08 juansepulveda
2:09
Mary Ann Zehr: 
About half of the questions that came in just before the chat inquire about the administration's support for bilingual education. Let's take a couple of them now.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:09 Mary Ann Zehr
2:09
[Comment From Dr. Emma J. ArmendárizDr. Emma J. Armendáriz: ] 
How much emphasis is going to be given to helping Latino youth retain their valuable asset of knowing a language other than English? As I see it, this is not only an asset for marketability in our global society, but it is also an issue related to national security. We do not do enough in our educational systems to encourage our youth to be bilingual, at a minimum, if not multilingual. Will this be a focus of the initiative to improve education for Latino youth?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:09 Dr. Emma J. Armendáriz
2:09
[Comment From Margaret HillMargaret Hill: ] 
How can dual language be honored, supported, and endorsed across the country, especially the southern part which borders Mexico? The research is strong in support of dual language programs and schools K-12.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:09 Margaret Hill
2:13
juansepulveda: 
We have now appointed someone for the OELA office, Dr. Rosalinda Barrera. We will be working closely with the OELA office to host regional summits starting in early 2011 to get input from practitioners in the field related to what the office should be doing to better serve ELL students.
You are absolutely correct. We agree in our 21st century global economy, it is crucial that our students build upon the linguistic strengths they already possess. We believe speaking two, three languages is a good thing and something our nation needs to cultivate.
We realize that there are many strong examples of positive dual language programs. At the end of the day, the most important thing for us is to provide our kids with a world-class education. Those dual language programs that get it done--increase the performance levels of our kids--are exactly the types of good practices that we think should be shared widely across the country and implemented at the local level. But, we have to make sure that these and other bilingual education programs are getting it done for our students.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:13 juansepulveda
2:14
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Here's a more pointed question on this topic about why the administration hasn't provided, in this person's view, more support for bilingual education.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:14 Mary Ann Zehr
2:14
[Comment From James LyonsJames Lyons: ] 
Mr. Sepúlveda: An October 19th article in Education Week entitled “White House Renews Attention to Hispanic Education” reported on the White House summit on Hispanic education, hosted by the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics which your office conducted a day earlier. The ED Week article stated, in part: Ray M. Keck, III, the President of Texas A&M International University, in Laredo, a city on the U.S.-Mexico border, pressed federal officials to go beyond only speaking in favor of bilingualism—students’ being able to speak two languages—and to be more aggressive in actually supporting dual-language education programs in schools. “Can’t we be brave enough to take on dual-language?” he asked. “Stay tuned,” said Juan Sepulveda, executive director of the initiative Mr. Sepúlveda, what is there to stay tuned for? The President has been in office for nearly two years, and there has been no visible support by the Administration for bilingual education or dual language education.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:14 James Lyons
2:15
Mary Ann Zehr: 
While you're reading that, here's a comment from someone who is running into some problems with bilingual education.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:15 Mary Ann Zehr
2:15
[Comment From Andrea SurrattAndrea Surratt: ] 
What is your take on bilingual instruction? Our district requires that students are taught only in Spanish for grades Kindergartend and First. When the students reach second grade their taught 50% in English with a goal of complete transition in third grade. We have run into many complications with this system. What are your suggestions?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:15 Andrea Surratt
2:18
juansepulveda: 
As I mentioned, we have a new leader for the OELA office, who has a long and deep history working on bilingual education issues.
The regional summits I mentioned are the next steps of making sure we get as many people from the field deeply involved in helping us set the agenda, moving forward.
This is different from what has happened in the past with other administrations. We are big believers in crowd-sourcing. We truly believe that the larger the number of people we engage, the better the end product will be. Folks who are working day-in day-out on this issues know better what it is going to take to get to the next level with these issues. So look for us early in 2011 to begin a two-way conversation with all of you, to not only discuss these issues, but to begin strategizing how to take action together to make sure we are doing all we can to help our kids.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:18 juansepulveda
2:18
Mary Ann Zehr: 
We received some good news in a Center on Education Policy report this week that the achievement gap between Latino and white students is narrowing faster than for some other groups. Here's a question about that.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:18 Mary Ann Zehr
2:19
[Comment From Robert JohnstonRobert Johnston: ] 
Great topic and thank you for hosting. One of the bright spoints in the recent Center on Education Policy's report on Achievement Gaps was that overall Latino students are showing some narrowing of gaps compared with white students and are narrowing the gap at a faster rate than African American students. Does this signal a turning point for Latinos and what, if anything, can we take away from this apparent progress -- at least as measured by state assessments in reading and math at the 4th and 8th grades and in high school?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:19 Robert Johnston
2:20
Mary Ann Zehr: 
By the way, here's a link to EdWeek's take on that report:

Study: States Must Move Faster to Close Achievement Gaps
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/12/14/15gap.h30.html?tkn=VSMFVZjG%2BwdzWm6wXNsk8dN2c40lKDWgalUJ&cmp=clp-edweek
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:20 Mary Ann Zehr
2:22
juansepulveda: 
At the end of the day, the most important thing for us is seeing whether any approach we use is actually increasing education attainment levels for our kids.
We think it is important to look at the current research and to listen to practitioners to gain better insight into what we should be doing in our schools but ,at the same time, we strongly believe that the worst thing we could do from DC would be to tell you what you should and should not be doing in your classrooms on a daily basis.
We feel that it is all of us working together and being honest about the tough issues we face and the complicated environments in which we work are some of the key pieces we need to take into account to find answers on how to move forward. There is no one-size fits all approach to working with ELL students. We need to be open to finding out the set of best practices that work best with our students and offer that menu of approaches to our educators nationwide.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:22 juansepulveda
2:22
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Let's move on to a question about some of the competing pressures on many Latino youths...
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:22 Mary Ann Zehr
2:22
[Comment From June Krinsky-RudderJune Krinsky-Rudder: ] 
How can we help students who are 'breadwinners' for their families to both stay in school, and assist their families, in these tough economic times?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:22 June Krinsky-Rudder
2:24
juansepulveda: 
It is no doubt a good starting point. But, we realize that there is still a lot of work to be done. We know we can build upon these results, but we can't forget that these are complicated issues with many moving pieces that we have to take into account, and once again, figure out better, newer ways of doing business across the board, throughout the entire education system.
At the end of the day, tinkering with the current system is not going to be enough. We believe we have to get serious with each community about what education reform should and can look like, moving forward. So we appreciate the gains that show up in this particular report, but realize we still have a long way to go.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:24 juansepulveda
2:25
Mary Ann Zehr: 
I'll give you a chance, Juan, to answer June's question before moving on.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:25 Mary Ann Zehr
2:27
edweekcraig: 
ref :Mr. Sepúlveda: An October 19th article in Education Week entitled “White House Renews Attention to Hispanic Education”

here's a link to that story mentioned earlier.

White House Renews Attention to Hispanic Education
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/10/19/09hispanic.h30.html
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:27 edweekcraig
2:28
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Here's an addition to June's question:
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:28 Mary Ann Zehr
2:28
[Comment From Trish Morita MullaneyTrish Morita Mullaney: ] 
To add to Ms. Krinsky-Rudder's question: How do we allow for this type of hybridity for working and schooling and NOT have it negatively impact the graduation rate? The students are graduating, just not in the typical 4 years.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:28 Trish Morita Mullaney
2:29
juansepulveda: 
Great quesiton. We know from speaking to thousands of people across the country that one crucial issue for our families is just understanding the overall education system and how families can navigate the entire process. Only 13% of the Latino population has a college degree. For most of our families there is no set of experiences on how to deal with the education system, particularly in relationship to going to college. We don't know about Pell Grants; we don't know and understand the positive side of student loans. We know there is a lot of work to be done with our families, to help them understand why it's important for our kids to go and complete college. And that means, in order for our kids to actually graduate from college, they may have to work less hours. It is very difficult for anyone working a full-time job and still get through college. We understand very clearly how tough things are for people today, and we can't ignore that. But we also have to help our families understand that an investment in education now will pay off in big terms in the future.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:29 juansepulveda
2:29
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Any ideas for how to help parents learn about specific options and programs at schools?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:29 Mary Ann Zehr
2:30
[Comment From Ines CifuentesInes Cifuentes: ] 
How can the initiative get the word out to Latino/Hispanic families about the opportunities in education? My experience in Montgomery County, Maryland is that many families don't know how to access the system in the way that White and Asian families do. Very few take advantage of magnet programs, gifted and talented, etc. By the time they realize what these programs are about their children are behind academically and it is almost impossible for them to catch up.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:30 Ines Cifuentes
2:31
juansepulveda: 
The best way for us to not allow both, working and going to school, to end up with negative results, we have to make sure students are only working limited hours. We realize it will take our students a bit longer to finish college because they are working part-time. But research tells us that if they work full-time and beyond, they are even less likely to get to the finish line. In the 21st century, completing college, not just starting college, is even more important for the economic security of our students and their families.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:31 juansepulveda
2:31
Mary Ann Zehr: 
By the way, I wrote a story for EdWeek that reported on how some successful Hispanic youths made it to 4-year colleges, even though their families couldn't give them information about college.
--Latino Students Less Likely to Select Four-Year Colleges
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/08/11/37guidance_ep-2.h29.html
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:31 Mary Ann Zehr
2:32
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Let's move on to a question about teacher quality.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:32 Mary Ann Zehr
2:32
[Comment From augustina h reyesaugustina h reyes: ] 
How would recommend that teacher quality be assured for Latino children who in most districts in the Southwest make up as much as 70% of the district enrollment. No study has been conducted on the the quality of the teachers who are responsible for the literacy of Lation children. What kind of colleges did they attend? Public or for profit? What was their major math, science or criminal justice and operations management? How many teachers with the criminal justice degrees, operations management and alternative certification are in in elelmentary schools (3rd to 6th) teaching ESL, reading, math and science to Latino children? What are the data about the qualifications of teachers teaching Latino students? Literacy in the 3rd grade predicts who will have access to productive citizenship in 2021.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:32 augustina h reyes
2:33
juansepulveda: 
Yes, Ines, you are right. We do face a set of challenges. But, we know that there are a number of great examples across the country of organizations and schools that are taking very creative and innovative approaches to how they work with families to learn about the education system. We have to increase the number of people that are working on these issues and we know, in these tough economic times, it's going to take even more community resources--private, philantropic, non-profit and the government--all coming together to touch as many families as we can.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:33 juansepulveda
2:35
Mary Ann Zehr: 
And on to Augustina's question?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:35 Mary Ann Zehr
2:39
juansepulveda: 
Teachers are critical to the success of our kids' education. We strongly believe that we need to focus more attention on how we can help teachers become better at their craft. We know that estimates say close to one million teachers will be retiring in the next 5-7 years. What that means, is we have a moment and an opportunity, to help create the next generation of teachers. So we have to do everything we can to encourage, recruit, retain and reward those teachers who are helping our kids get to the next level. And for those teachers who are struggling, we have to do what we can to offer professional development opportunities to help them become stronger teachers. We understand that unfortunately, there are some teachers who are not getting it done for our kids and we have to do all we can to both, understand that situation and attack it. Because at the end of the day, the most important thing is whether or not our kids are getting a world-class education. This isn't an easy issue. We are working closely with our friends at the unions, side-by-side with parents, and students and teachers, to together figure out how we best move forward and not just point fingers at each other or blame one another and focus our energy on how best to move forward when it comes to teacher quality.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:39 juansepulveda
2:39
Mary Ann Zehr: 
David would like to return to the topic of parent engagement. Here's a question from him about funding.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:39 Mary Ann Zehr
2:39
[Comment From David ValladolidDavid Valladolid: ] 
I think you would agree with me that without parent engagement at home and at school, students don't have a chance to secure a quality and post-secondary education. Has Secretary Duncan's proposal to double the amount of Title I funding from 1% to 2% for parent involment been approved? Everyone seems to talk alot about the importance of "Parent Engagement" but funding continues to be limited for these programs. What can you suggest for changing this reality? Thanks for hosting this forum to address the important issues affecting the education of our children.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:39 David Valladolid
2:44
juansepulveda: 
Thanks, David. The proposed increase in parent engagement funding has not yet been approved because it is a part of the ESEA reauthorization that the president is proposing. We hope to work closely with Congress in the new session, after the new year, to move forward with ESEA reauthorization as a whole. We agree that deep parent engagement is crucial to the success of our kids. And groups, such as PIQE, are strong examples of what solid parent engagement work can be. We understand that, at the end of the day, the largest amount of funding, roughly 90 cents of every dollar, comes from the state and local level. So we encourage the states and local school districts to not cut back on what they are currently doing, so that together with the funding that does come from DC we can do our best to serve even more families.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:44 juansepulveda
2:45
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Two participants have weighed in with questions about the involvement of charter schools in improving education for English-language learners.

In some states enrollment of ELLs in charter schools has been low compared to regular public schools.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:45 Mary Ann Zehr
2:45
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
How do you plan to engage charter schools in ELL advocacy and work?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:45 Guest
2:45
[Comment From M. BootheM. Boothe: ] 
What are your plans to engage charter schools in ELL advocacy and compliance?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:45 M. Boothe
2:50
juansepulveda: 
We know that all our schools need to be involved in better serving our ELL students. Once again, there is no one-size fits all answer to what needs to happen. For those charter schools that are great charter schools, in that they are showing evidence of helping our kids, they need to be a part of the conversation. But, let me be clear, charters alone are not the answer. And those charter schools that are failing, alongside other schools that are not getting it done for our kids, all of these schools need to be serious about the level of reform they need to take on. For children that come from families that are not struggling financially, they have a larger number of options when it comes to education. We need to do better to increase the number of options our kids receive, and that includes successful charter schools, side-by-side with those great public schools that have already figured out how to successfully work with low-income Latino kids.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:50 juansepulveda
2:51
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Let's turn to the topic of how some Latino students in this country lack papers to live in this country legally...
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:51 Mary Ann Zehr
2:51
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Students without legal status often give up, quit school. What is being done to help the educational future for these students?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:51 Guest
2:51
[Comment From MerrylMerryl: ] 
A few unrelated questions: I work in a teacher preparation program in a community that is 90% Hispanic. What suggestions do you have for teacher educators? What suggestions do you have to get the best and brightest teachers into low income communities? Finally, how do we convince legislators to look right under their nose for bilingual teachers (bysupporting the Dream Act) rather than importing them from around the world?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:51 Merryl
2:52
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Meanwhile, here's a comment from a participant about ELLs.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:52 Mary Ann Zehr
2:52
[Comment From Joseph TuckerJoseph Tucker: ] 
Good afternoon. A comment - Having worked in both urban and rural settings as an ESL teacher, I would like to thank President Obama and the education department for their efforts addressing ELL issues.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:52 Joseph Tucker
2:53
Mary Ann Zehr: 
And here's yet another question that relates to addressing the undocumented status of some students...
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:53 Mary Ann Zehr
2:53
[Comment From Adrian M.Adrian M.: ] 
If the DREAM Act or any other open mind law is not approved. How could you complete this mandate?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:53 Adrian M.
2:55
juansepulveda: 
First of all, it's crucial that Congress passes the DREAM Act. We had an historic vote a week ago in the House, where the DREAM Act was passed. We know that the Senate will be taking up the DREAM Act sometime soon and it is critical that they step up and support this piece of legislation, which helps talented, young people that are already leaders in our community today who came to the U.S. through no fault of their own. We do not have a history of punishing kids for the actions of their parents. And we know that it is in our educational, economic and national interest to make sure we do not lose another generation of talent that desperately wants to serve their country by continuing their education and getting a college degree and signing up to serve in our armed forces.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:55 juansepulveda
2:55
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Here's a question from someone interested in informal education.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:55 Mary Ann Zehr
2:55
[Comment From Bob RussellBob Russell: ] 
All of the questions so far deal with K-12 formal education. I had posed a question earlier about what you see as the role of informal and afterschool education. It seems to me this is very important, especially as it relates to developing career interest in science and health professions. Can you please address this?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:55 Bob Russell
2:56
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Here's Bob's initial question that I didn't get to until now.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:56 Mary Ann Zehr
2:56
[Comment From Bob RussellBob Russell: ] 
What role do you think informal education, such as science museums and afterschool science programs, play in the overall White House Initiative?
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:56 Bob Russell
2:58
juansepulveda: 
Merryl, we think there need to be positive incentives given to young people to join the teaching profession and to serve in those communities where they are most needed. President Obama has supported financial incentives to encourage teachers to come to the toughest schools. And because these schools offer some of the toughest educational challenges throughout the system, the president believes we should pay these teachers more for taking on the toughest assignments. And there is no doubt that there are many DREAM Act students who could successfully provide something we are missing--great bilingual teachers.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:58 juansepulveda
2:59
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Juan, Bob's question about informal education will be the last one.
Thursday December 16, 2010 2:59 Mary Ann Zehr
3:00
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Let me pause here to say hats off to participants for all the great questions.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:00 Mary Ann Zehr
3:01
Mary Ann Zehr: 
And while we're waiting for that last answer, here are a few comments.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:01 Mary Ann Zehr
3:01
[Comment From Tammy Robbins, HSV, ALTammy Robbins, HSV, AL: ] 
Thank you for your time! It was an enlightening chat.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:01 Tammy Robbins, HSV, AL
3:01
[Comment From Adrian M.Adrian M.: ] 
Gracias Juan y mucha pero mucha SUERTE!!
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:01 Adrian M.
3:02
edweekcraig: 
And hats off to Mary Ann for moderating. I'll remind you, once all questions are done, a transcript will be posted shortly
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:02 edweekcraig
3:02
juansepulveda: 
Yes Bob, you are correct. What happens to our kids before school starts and at the end of the day is also very important. There are great examples of programs such as Diplomas Now that connect public schools directly with non-profit organizations such as, Communities In School and City Year, to provide both, programs before and after school.
Another key challenge is summertime. Unfortunately, many students lose and do not retain a lot of what they learned during the school year. Those programs that are working with our kids to provide ongoing summer education opportunities are also very important as a piece of the puzzle of how we best serve our kids. This is also a place where local governments, who many times do not have much to do directly with the public school system, can partner with school districts to provide these types of opportunities.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:02 juansepulveda
3:03
Mary Ann Zehr: 
Thank you, Juan, for your time and answers.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:03 Mary Ann Zehr
3:03
[Comment From MerrylMerryl: ] 
Gracias por todo.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:03 Merryl
3:04
juansepulveda: 
Thanks to Mary Ann and Edweek and everyone that joined us today for this conversation. Please go to our Facebook page to get continuous, updated information on all we are doing.
Happy Holidays! Juan
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:04 juansepulveda
3:08
edweekcraig: 
Here's the FaceBook link: http://www.facebook.com/pages/White-House-Initiative-on-Education-Excellence-for-Hispanics/116820385017747
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:08 edweekcraig
3:08
edweekcraig: 
That's 'all she wrote' folks. thanks for taking part. ByeBye.
Thursday December 16, 2010 3:08 edweekcraig
3:08
 

 
 
 

A Conversation with Juan Sepúlveda

Thursday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m. Eastern time

Chat With Juan Sepúlveda

Juan Sepúlveda, Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.
Juan Sepúlveda, the director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics, discussed how administration officials plan to work with communities across the country to carry out President Obama’s October 19 executive order to improve education for Latino students. He and other leaders of the initiative visited 90 communities over 18 months to hear advice on this critical subject.

Guests:
Juan Sepúlveda, Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.
Mary Ann Zehr, assistant editor for Education Week, will moderate this chat.

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