Diplomas Count 2015: Next Steps - Life After Special Education
Published Online: May 29, 2015

Diplomas Count 2015: State Graduation Briefs

The Diplomas Count 2015 Graduation Briefs capture all of the data you need to assess your state's performance in key areas. The information is presented in a series of charts and graphs, and includes comparisons to national averages. You won't want to miss your state's data, so download your copy now:

Graduation Briefs
National Brief
State Reports

State Graduation Briefs are available for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia and compare individual state data to national results. The National Graduation Brief includes national averages.

Your report includes:

National Profile, Students with Disabilities

Demographics

Postsecondary outcomes

State Profile, Students with Disabilities

Demographics

Time spent in regular classrooms

Achievement

High school exit status

Discipline

State and National Graduation Profile, Class of 2013

Overall Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR)

Graduation rates for student subgroups

Graduation rate trends

About These Reports

The 10th edition of Education Week’s annual Diplomas Count report—Next Steps: Life After Special Education—examines the experiences of students with disabilities as they make the transition from high school to postsecondary education, the workplace, and adult life. The State Graduation Briefs contain national and state-specific data on this group’s achievement levels, discipline rates, and high school outcomes.

This year, for the first time, Diplomas Count uses the U.S. Department of Education’s Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR), as the primary source of data on high school completion. The ACGR is the method states are required to use for federal accountability purposes. Reports highlight state and national graduation outcomes for the class of 2013. This analysis includes the entire class of 2013, as well as additional information on trends and the performance of subgroups, including students with disabilities.

Vol. 33, Issue 34