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Published in Print: January 24, 2001, as Legislative Update

Legislative Update

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The following is a summary of governors' education proposals for fiscal 2002. The figures for the state budget and for precollegiate education spending include money for state education administration, but not federal, flow-through dollars. Percentage increases are based on rounded numbers, and estimated enrollment reflects the state's projected public school enrollment for 2001-02, unless otherwise noted. Depending on the state, figures may or may not include prekindergarten spending and enrollment.



GEORGIA

Governor: Roy E. Barnes (D)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $15.45 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $6.01 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget:$5.47 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +9.9 percent

Current pre-K-12 enrollment: 1.4 million

Highlights:

  • Gov. Barnes is recommending a 4.5 percent raise for teachers, which would keep Georgia's salaries at national average, but is less than what teachers were hoping for this year.

Gov. Roy E. Barnes

  • Governor wants to spend $68.5 million in fiscal 2002 to pay for one teacher's aide in each kindergarten classroom, for total of roughly 6,000 such aides. His A-Plus Education Reform Act, passed last year, stopped districts from using paraprofessionals to increase class sizes, prompting layoffs across the state.
  • Mr. Barnes also proposes $18.9 million to expand state's Early Intervention Program, which reduces teacher-pupil ratio to 1-to-11 for students who are below grade level, from grades K-3 to 4th and 5th grades.

MARYLAND

Governor: Parris N. Glendening (D)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $21.4 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $2.99 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget:$2.82 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +6 percent

Current pre-K-12 enrollment: 853,000*

Highlights:

  • Gov. Glendening proposes $19 million for a new early-childhood initiative designed to help reduce class sizes and pay for programs in preschool through 3rd grade. Aside from that new initiative, governor would devote most of his proposed education budget increases to continuing existing programs,
  • Mr. Glendening asks for $85 million to pay for second year of program to enhance teacher salaries. Under the plan, school districts that raise salaries by 4 percent a year get additional 1 percent state match. If funded, plan would increase teacher salaries in participating districts by 10 percent by 2002.
  • Governor also pledges to fight for $8 million for second year of controversial program that helps pay for textbooks for private school students.
  • To help offset higher fuel prices, budget would expand state's school transportation funding from $122 million to $133 million in next fiscal year.

OREGON

Governor: John A. Kitzhaber (D)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $4.8 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre- K-12 budget: $2.71 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget:$2.45 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +10.6 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment:577,000*

Highlights:

  • With first year of biennial budget starting in July, governor proposes using $110 million of $348 million available from state's tobacco-lawsuit settlement for proposed reading initiative.
  • Governor proposes $220 million over two years to improve elementary reading skills, half from tobacco-settlement money, and rest from existing funds. Schools would be expected to make sure that 90 percent of 3rd and 5th graders met state reading benchmarks in four years.
  • Over two-year period, governor calls for $2.7 million for dropout-prevention programs in secondary schools and $1.5 million for new mentoring program for beginning teachers. Schools designated as low-performing also would receive $4.2 million in assistance.

NEW YORK

Governor: George E. Pataki (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $57.4 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $14.08 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $13.63 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +3.3 percent

Estimated pre-K-12 enrollment: 2.9 million

Highlights:

  • Governor proposes increase of more than $380 million in annual education spending, along with "fundamental reform" of school finance system to combine 11 existing funding programs into single state-aid stream and give districts more control over spending. Budget would also increase school construction aid by $170 million, to $1.3 billion.
  • Mr. Pataki also calls for capping annual district spending increases at 4 percent, or 120 percent of increase in consumer price index, whichever is less, unless two-thirds of local voters disagree.
  • Budget would double spending, to $50 million, to help recruit, retain, and upgrade the skills of teachers. But it would hold spending steady for prekindergarten programs and class-size reduction, both areas that legislature has targeted for increases.

VERMONT

Governor: Howard Dean (D)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $2.32 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $982 million

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $880 million

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +11.6 percent

Estimated pre-K-12 enrollment: 104,000

Highlights:.

Gov. Howard Dean

  • Gov. Dean projects $13.3 million shortfall in tax revenues under Act 60—state's school finance overhaul enacted in 1997 that created a controversial state property tax—but expects it to decline to $100,000 by end of 2002.
  • Governor requests $1.25 million for new program to improve teaching skills and financial incentives for teachers to become certified by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Also asks legislature to consider providing money to help retired teachers pay for health care.

*Figure excludes preschool.

Vol. 20, Issue 19, Page 18

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