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Teacher Colleges Ramp Up Technology Focus

Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 2 to 3 p.m. ET
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 Chat: Teacher Colleges Ramp Up Technology Focus(02/18/2014) 
9:06
Stacey Decker: 
Good morning! I hope you are looking forward to today's chat, Teacher Colleges Ramp Up Technology Focus, sponsored by Curriculum Associates. I've opened the chat up for questions, so please submit any you have for our guests below.

We will be back at 2 p.m. ET with Odin Jurkowski and Danielle Herro. See you then!
Tuesday February 18, 2014 9:06 Stacey Decker
1:55
Stacey Decker: 

Good afternoon and welcome to today's free live chat, Teacher Colleges Ramp Up Technology Focus, sponsored by Curriculum Associates. We'll be underway in just a few minutes. In the meantime, please keep submitting your questions below.

Tuesday February 18, 2014 1:55 Stacey Decker
1:59
Stacey Decker: 
Thanks for joining us! I'm handing the chat over to today's moderator, Sean Cavanagh. Take it away, Sean.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 1:59 Stacey Decker
2:01
Sean Cavanagh: 
Hello, everyone. I'm Sean Cavanagh, an associate editor at Education Week, and I'll be moderating today's chat. I'd like to now ask our two guests to introduce themselves to the audience.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:01 Sean Cavanagh
2:01
Odin Jurkowski: 
My name is Odin Jurkowski. I'm a professor of educational technology and department chair for career and technology education at the University of Central Missouri. This is my 12th year at UCM and my 20th overall working in higher ed.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:01 Odin Jurkowski
2:03
Sean Cavanagh: 
For background on how the nation's teacher colleges are attempting to adjust their lesson/curriculum to meet digital demands, see the recent Ed Week story from a special report on technology:

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19el-teachers.h33.html
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:03 Sean Cavanagh
2:05
Danielle Herro: 
I'm Danielle Herro, Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning at Clemson University. I've spent 20 years in K-12 education as a classroom teacher, technology coordinator and instructional technology administrator.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:05 Danielle Herro
2:06
Sean Cavanagh: 
I'll start by posing this question to Odin, from Brandon, about how teacher colleges can adjust to evolving tech....
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:06 Sean Cavanagh
2:06
[Comment From BrandonBrandon: ] 
Since technology changes so fast, are you focusing on specific brands (like Facebook, Twitter, etc.) or on broader technological literacy? How do you even teach the latter in a lasting way?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:06 Brandon
2:06
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle, this one from Ruth is for you:
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:06 Sean Cavanagh
2:06
[Comment From RuthRuth: ] 
What technologies/programs/software/tools have been most popular among your teaching students?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:06 Ruth
2:08
Danielle Herro: 
Our students use a variety of technologies in our courses - Facebook, Twitter, mobiles, Google Apps, Edmodo, free tools found online etc., we focus on impacting the learner and critically evaluating the tools embedded in a content-focused lesson.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:08 Danielle Herro
2:08
Odin Jurkowski: 
Broad technological literacy. Yes, we still utilize specific tools and brands, but the concept is what's most important. The technology will always change, so students need to learn how to adapt and how to learn. Lifelong learning and the importance of continuing education is the key. It's about making students comfortable with technology so that they will continue to evolve as the technology does.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:08 Odin Jurkowski
2:08
Sean Cavanagh: 
Thanks Odin -- any thoughts on the Q, above, from Ruth?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:08 Sean Cavanagh
2:09
Odin Jurkowski: 
Students like free.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:09 Odin Jurkowski
2:09
Odin Jurkowski: 
They like the web based tools they can access from any computer.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:09 Odin Jurkowski
2:10
Sean Cavanagh: 
Here's a question that gets at the big picture, for you both, from Sandor C
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:10 Sean Cavanagh
2:10
[Comment From Sandor C.Sandor C.: ] 
Do we underestimate the tech savvy of teachers and teacher-candidates? Isn't there just a stereotype about the technologically hapless teacher?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:10 Sandor C.
2:11
Danielle Herro: 
I don't think we underestimate the ability of teacher candidates to use the tools, however, it is clear to me that our pre-service and in-service teachers don't necessarily connect the tools to learning.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:11 Danielle Herro
2:11
Odin Jurkowski: 
Sandor: Yes and no. It think it's really all over the map. Some students are coming in with quite a lot of skills and knowledge, and some with almost none. They also don't necessarily understand how to incoporate these tools into their teaching.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:11 Odin Jurkowski
2:12
Sean Cavanagh: 
Here's a question from my colleague Ben Herold, who has been reporting on major district tech initiatives
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:12 Sean Cavanagh
2:12
[Comment From Benjamin Herold, Education WeekBenjamin Herold, Education Week: ] 
To what extent are forward-thinking teacher colleges focused on preparing prospective educators to use all-in-one digital learning environments (e.g, learning management systems or platforms) as opposed to preparing them to mix-and-match classroom apps?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:12 Benjamin Herold, Education Week
2:12
Sean Cavanagh: 
Sorry, that's for you both
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:12 Sean Cavanagh
2:12
Danielle Herro: 
For preservice teachers - Twitter as a professional learning community is a new concept. Edmodo as Facebook-like, engaging tool is new to them as well. Mobiles and social media are often thought of as for personal use only.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:12 Danielle Herro
2:12
What are teachers’ greatest challenges in trying to become experts at using technology in the classroom?
Unfamiliar w/ with technology
 ( 13% )
Intimidated by students’ mastery of tech tools/dev
 ( 4% )
Lack of support from school administrators
 ( 9% )
Need for more mentoring, help from colleagues
 ( 4% )
Uncertain how to weave it in daily lessons
 ( 70% )

Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:12 
2:13
Odin Jurkowski: 
Ben: I really haven't seen it. When teachers get out there in the classroom each school is different so they need to be prepared to adjust into any environment. If we focus on one set of tools then they may not be comfortable when they get to a school that does it completely different.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:13 Odin Jurkowski
2:14
Danielle Herro: 
Ben, to answer your question - we haven't seen any truly engaging learning management systems that function the way the real world does - where the tools allow for creativity, collaboration, production etc. that is personalized.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:14 Danielle Herro
2:14
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin, here's a follow-up question from Sandor
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:14 Sean Cavanagh
2:14
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Re Sandor's question, are we talking about a generational difference?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:14 Guest
2:14
Odin Jurkowski: 
Ben, it is really amazing the variety of the schools that our students end up.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:14 Odin Jurkowski
2:16
Odin Jurkowski: 
Sandor. Generational difference? Sometimes, but not always. Yes, some generations do tend to lean towards specific tools. But there are always exceptions. Some older teachers are very tech savy, and some young not. It's really about working with each individually.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:16 Odin Jurkowski
2:16
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle, I'll send this one on "tech integration" your way
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:16 Sean Cavanagh
2:16
[Comment From R. SmithR. Smith: ] 
I work at a Teachers College and we have a course called Educational Technology where one unit of the course looks at The Technology Integration Matrix etc. Do you also introduce content like this and others with faculty so they are able to integrate technology in a meaningful way?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:16 R. Smith
2:16
Danielle Herro: 
I agree with Odin, one-size-fits-all would not prepare our students at all. It is about "genres' of tools and their potential, and linking content and production (from future students) to what the technology affords.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:16 Danielle Herro
2:18
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin: No ed-tech discussion can occur without a mention of "MOOCs"...this one's for you
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:18 Sean Cavanagh
2:18
[Comment From StephSteph: ] 
What role do you see MOOCs playing in changing the role of education and being life long learners? If full courses can be complete online and the test completed with integrity with online proctoring services could the traditional education model be changing?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:18 Steph
2:19
Danielle Herro: 
To R. Smith - we have new course at Clemson that all preservice teachers take called "Educational Foundations of Digital Media and Learning". We do a lot with simulated lessons and case study (deconstruction of innovation in schools), and practice using various genres in tools in "lessons" or "units" where undergrads take the role of the learner or student. We might do a social studies unit using simple data analytics and infographics, or a literature unit supported with Google Apps, mobiles and digital storytelling etc.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:19 Danielle Herro
2:20
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle -- Here's a follow-up Q from Jaime, regarding your reference to Twitter
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:20 Sean Cavanagh
2:20
[Comment From JaimeJaime: ] 
Can you give us a couple examples of how a teacher would actually use Twitter in instruction? I'm skeptical.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:20 Jaime
2:21
Odin Jurkowski: 
Steph: MOOCs were hot, about a year ago. But the research and all the stats are showing dismal completion rates, horrible participation rates, and no one is making any money from this. Pedagogically it's a throwback to the old days of correspondance schools. If anything, they might be a good medium for ongoing professional development, in additional to formal training. I can also see them as a resource for a class with a local instructor, so it's just like a textbook or a collection of resources.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:21 Odin Jurkowski
2:21
Sean Cavanagh: 
Q for you, Odin, about standards for teacher-ed/tech courses, from Susan.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:21 Sean Cavanagh
2:21
[Comment From SusanSusan: ] 
What guidelines/standards do higher ed faculty use to teach teacher candidates how to incorporate into teaching....how to capture the content through technology in meaningful ways?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:21 Susan
2:22
Danielle Herro: 
Jaime - I've seen high school teachers use Twitterfalls (comments from the class) while a student is presenting or talking through a topic to elicit responses and discussion. I've worked with many teachers who Tweet announcements, updates, assignments, links to resources and then organize student groups to work together in a like fashion. Hashtags with directed "interest groups" for literacy, special ed, ed technology etc., are also very popular among in-service teachers.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:22 Danielle Herro
2:22
Sean Cavanagh: 
For background on the U of Central Missouri's teacher ed/technology program, see the recent Q and A with him, from our special report on blended learning:

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19el-blended-qa.h33.html
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:22 Sean Cavanagh
2:23
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle -- A Q for your on subject specialization, and tech, from R. Smith:
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:23 Sean Cavanagh
2:23
[Comment From R. SmithR. Smith: ] 
Based on your response that is very similar to what is done at my institution. What I am wondering however in the other specializations, e.g. Mathematics, do the lecturers utilize the various tools in teaching the students Mathematics so they get a real live experience?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:23 R. Smith
2:24
Odin Jurkowski: 
Good question Susan. We can use ISTE standards as a guide for faculty to ensure candidates are prepared. I do think, however, that there's a lot more that can be done. So much of what we do is tied to state certification requirements, and here in Missouri they are pretty much not there when it comes to technology. Just a few general statements, which means it's all over the map at each university.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:24 Odin Jurkowski
2:24
Danielle Herro: 
Susan - we use the principles of Connected Learning in our teaching with pre-service teachers, as well as ISTE Nets and some of the "fluencies" addressed in a book called, Literacy is NOT Enough. This is within the digital media course, however. Our other faculty uses ISTE Nets primarily.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:24 Danielle Herro
2:25
Sean Cavanagh: 
Here's a big picture Q for you both, from Walter
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:25 Sean Cavanagh
2:25
[Comment From WalterWalter: ] 
I often read and hear that teachers don't know how to use instructional technology effectively, but my experience tells me that factors other than expertise may be the culprits, e.g., time to plan, consistent access to appropriate hardware and software, reliable Internet service, etc. Your thoughts?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:25 Walter
2:26
Danielle Herro: 
R. Smith - I think our other specializations vary greatly in their approach and tools that they use. Our math department uses Geogebra (spelling?), graphing calculators and a few Apps that turn their online environment into interactive whiteboard space. Admittedly, some faculty use very little technology in their courses. I'm sure this is not a surprise!
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:26 Danielle Herro
2:27
Odin Jurkowski: 
Walter: Yes, it's a complicated issue. I agree that it's not just the technology itself, but budgets, administration, time, professional development, etc. Throwing technology at a technology alone is not enough.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:27 Odin Jurkowski
2:28
Danielle Herro: 
Walter, the factors you mention most definitely play into the lack of integration, however I think access is getting better, hardware and software more reliable and less expensive, and time to plan somewhat unchanged. I think the biggest culprit is professional development.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:28 Danielle Herro
2:29
Odin Jurkowski: 
Walter, I would add that we need to prepare teachers that will be the next generation of leaders and who will speak up at their schools for the support they need to be effective. Professional development is one big area that is often overlooked.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:29 Odin Jurkowski
2:29
Sean Cavanagh: 
We've had a couple questions roll on about how you go about re-designing a course or curriculum for a teacher-ed program to integrate tech. Including this Q, below. Could both of you pls explain, where do you start?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:29 Sean Cavanagh
2:29
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
When you redesigned course or curriculum, what are the criteria used in the process? Is NET-T embedded in the design?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:29 Guest
2:30
Danielle Herro: 
Sophisticated technologies (access to them, and expectations for them) have moved into general use at a remarkably fast pace. We are institutions working with what used to work. The model has shifted from under our feet.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:30 Danielle Herro
2:30
[Comment From R. SmithR. Smith: ] 
Thanks. No surprise at all. Similar issues here and I know Math Dept. uses that tool too.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:30 R. Smith
2:31
Sean Cavanagh: 
Comment from a reader (not the moderator)
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:31 Sean Cavanagh
2:31
[Comment From SeanSean: ] 
I agree with Odin. A major push has to be at the policy level. Until technology in part of the evaluation process teachers will not be required to integrate technology.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:31 Sean
2:31
Odin Jurkowski: 
Ideally the standards should be emedded in the design when creating a new course. However, in practice unless the college specifically requires it then it's up to the individual instructor. I think this is where a lot can break down. Questions of autonomy, what is required and what is not.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:31 Odin Jurkowski
2:32
Danielle Herro: 
When we redesigned our courses we considered:
(1) understanding the potential of digital media to impact learning based on youth participatory practices, (2) 21st century skills, ISTE NETS, CCSS as guide posts (along with connected learning), (3) ways to critique new technologies as useful/not useful for instruction - directly embedded in simulated lessons, and (4) ethical implications for all of the above
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:32 Danielle Herro
2:32
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle - Q for you about the role, if there is one, of state departments of ed
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:32 Sean Cavanagh
2:32
[Comment From SusanSusan: ] 
what do you see as the role of a state department of education in supplementing/ assisting your efforts to introduce educator candidates to best practices in use of technology for content and skills in the classroom?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:32 Susan
2:33
Odin Jurkowski: 
I agree with Danielle, so many of the tools that students are using as a general consumer are showing up in the classroom and in other work environments. This has shifted pretty fast.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:33 Odin Jurkowski
2:33
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin -- wondering how you'll respond to this one, as it applies to the aspiring/practicing teachers you see.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:33 Sean Cavanagh
2:33
[Comment From DanyDany: ] 
Aren't people just born with tech literacy? So that the savvy get savvier, and the disconnected never progress?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:33 Dany
2:34
[Comment From DaveDave: ] 
re: Odin. MOOCs can be a valuable tool as part of PD programs for educators, if it is truly designed as self-directed learning. In that case, they become valuable tools that educators can personalize to their own needs, choosing what you want to learn about in the time they have available. Based on our research, teachers often participate in very small chunks of time, and the value of the course is better measured by attainment of an individual's goals vs completing a set of pre-determined tasks. And in a well-designed MOOC, the interaction and networking with a large, diverse community from around the world is a valuable experience as well.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:34 Dave
2:35
Odin Jurkowski: 
Dany: That's possible to some extent, but is why intervention is needed. A student that is not tech savy, like a reader that is below grade level, might need some extra attention. You may never get them to be a superstar, but you could at least help them to grow.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:35 Odin Jurkowski
2:36
Danielle Herro: 
If the state department could ensure greater access (our broadband outside of higher ed - local schools - is all over the map in poor, rural areas), enact policies that allow schools responsible use of cloud computing tools and internet access, support greater PD efforts and provide some type of framework so schools know if they are hitting the target (something that is NOT punitive in nature), that would be great.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:36 Danielle Herro
2:36
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle; Q from the audience about how to change programs, without redesigning courses....
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:36 Sean Cavanagh
2:36
[Comment From DaveDave: ] 
It seems so often that we spend a lot of time trying to build a complete system to integrate technology into a course. This can be daunting and stall our rate of change. Meanwhile, the general public (and K-12 students) just pick up new apps, new devices, and start using them. Can you suggest some of the low-hanging fruit for technology integration in coursework? Ways that faculty can make small changes without having to carve out time to redesign a course?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:36 Dave
2:36
[Comment From MichelleMichelle: ] 
Question for the moderator - Will there be a transcript available once this chat is over?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:36 Michelle
 
Stacey Decker: 
Hi Michelle, yes, there will be a transcript of this chat available on this same page later today.
  Stacey Decker
2:37
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin -- pls see question from Anna
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:37 Sean Cavanagh
2:37
[Comment From Anna from ArmeniaAnna from Armenia: ] 
Are there online platforms to help faculty (or instructors) identify the best, most effective technologies, for specific courses. Not all universities have budgets for in-service training.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:37 Anna from Armenia
2:38
Odin Jurkowski: 
Dave, yes, I agree there is a time and a place. There are certainly some interesting possibilities with MOOCs and other formats. It's knowing when and how and why to use them as opposed to some of the headlines that spouted how they would transform higher ed and reduce costs to almost nothing.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:38 Odin Jurkowski
2:38
[Comment From SeanSean: ] 
I think part of the problem with technology integration is how we define good teaching. You can be a good teacher without integrating technology into your classroom.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:38 Sean
2:39
Sean Cavanagh: 
Comment from an audience member, above
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:39 Sean Cavanagh
2:41
Danielle Herro: 
Dave - low hanging fruit:
Google Apps for Education - forms, docs, Google Hangout, etc., easy sharing, highly collaborative, and versatile/visual, iPads and other mobiles with Apps that allow you to produce/create and share audio/video etc.,, online polling tools like Socrative. Edmodo, Pinterest, Twitter for PLC or engaging a wider community. Glogster (digital poster) for younger students - if you are teaching pre-service educators. There is a Cool Tools for Schools website that has hundreds of great ideas.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:41 Danielle Herro
2:41
Odin Jurkowski: 
Anna, good question. It's hard to say what the best, most effective technologies are for specific courses, and as you state not all universities have the biggest budgets. I think in general that staying current with the professional literature, professional organizations, blogs and websites to see what others are doing, going to conferences, and perhaps locally setting up a group of educators to periodically meet and talk would be a good idea. You could create your own learning community and share and teach what you are doing and learn a lot from each other.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:41 Odin Jurkowski
2:41
Sean Cavanagh: 
Teacher colleges aren't the only ones focused on integrating technology into the classroom. It's a growing area of focus among administrators, too. See the recent EW story from our special report on blended learning:
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19el-administrators.h33.html
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:41 Sean Cavanagh
2:42
Sean Cavanagh: 
Q for Odin about "flipped" classrooms, from Alice
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:42 Sean Cavanagh
2:42
[Comment From AliceAlice: ] 
Have you implemented any form of "Flipped Classroom" instruction into your Teacher Education programs? How effective do you find this trend?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:42 Alice
2:42
[Comment From PamPam: ] 
Well, I know my teacher candidates have very little tech skills - surprising to me. True, they don't know how to incorporate the tools. Hard to teach when the tools are difficult for them to learn due to their lack of tech skills coming in.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:42 Pam
2:43
[Comment From Elizabeth CarrandiElizabeth Carrandi: ] 
Good afternoon! I am the Coordinator of Instructional Technology for Broward College's Teacher Education Program. I would like to know what other teacher prep programs are doing to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate technology in meaningful ways.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:43 Elizabeth Carrandi
2:43
Sean Cavanagh: 
Hi Elizabeth: see our recent Ed Week story for some other ideas:
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19el-teachers.h33.html
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:43 Sean Cavanagh
2:44
Odin Jurkowski: 
Alice, I've not seen any teachers flip their classrooms here although we do talk about it a lot. A lot of our grad students have stories about other teachers in their schools flipping classrooms. It's a hot area, great for some teachers but not for all. I think there is also some interesting middle room because it doesn't have to be all or none.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:44 Odin Jurkowski
2:44
Danielle Herro: 
Pam - my experience with pre-service teachers has been that the learning curve is not very high to learn the new tools. I can usually give a 5-10 minute mini-lesson, pair them up, provide a YouTube link if necessary for greater detail, and let them tinker for 20 minutes. I've done this for 3 semesters and the students evaluate the "process" as very effective.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:44 Danielle Herro
2:44
[Comment From SharenSharen: ] 
Technology integration is important but it can also provide access for students such as English language learners and students with disabilities - so using and being comfortable with technology can benefit all
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:44 Sharen
2:45
Odin Jurkowski: 
I agree with Danielle, a lot of these tools are easy to learn, not too complicated, and have quick learning curves.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:45 Odin Jurkowski
2:45
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin, Danielle: this question is for you both. Does classroom management factor into your lessons/ curriculum?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:45 Sean Cavanagh
2:45
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Since classroom management is always a problem, how do you prepare students for managing technology as they incorporate it into their lessons?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:45 Guest
2:46
Sean Cavanagh: 
A report published a couple years ago by the National Assn of State Boards of Ed examined teacher colleges' shortcomings in promoting the wise use of technology:

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2013/01/a_closer_look_at_teachers_tech_1.html
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:46 Sean Cavanagh
2:47
Odin Jurkowski: 
How do you prepare students? Observation, practice, learning from others. As with anything, students need more clinical experiences and more time actually teaching to learn what works and what doesn't, and how to do it differently.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:47 Odin Jurkowski
2:47
[Comment From R. SmithR. Smith: ] 
Sean I agree with you. To share a quote "Good teaching may overcome a poor choice of technology, but technology will never save bad teaching." - Tony Bates
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:47 R. Smith
2:47
Danielle Herro: 
Considering how engaging the tool might be is key, and I'm a huge proponent of knowing enough about the tool students started, but not spend the entire 30-60 minutes on the tool. Small chunks of instructional for the technical components seem to work well. Much of what we want students to do in class is blending online/offline research and production - at any age level.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:47 Danielle Herro
2:49
Danielle Herro: 
My point being, if the technology fails, your alternate plan isn't to abandon the entire project for the day, but work with the other components. And, recognize the pockets of expertise in the classroom....make some of the kids experts in particular technical skills to help another.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:49 Danielle Herro
2:49
Odin Jurkowski: 
Technology also allows choices for students, to differentiate instruction, and provides for individual preferences. Yes, a classroom could get by with no technology, but it may not reach the potential of what could be.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:49 Odin Jurkowski
2:49
Sean Cavanagh: 
Q for Odin, from Pam
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:49 Sean Cavanagh
2:49
[Comment From PamPam: ] 
My teacher candidates are not tech savvy enough yet to create a hybrid/online course. Basic skills are still needed. How do I get them to the next level?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:49 Pam
2:50
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle: See Q from Kathleen. Can you explain your basic course requirements at Clemson's program?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:50 Sean Cavanagh
2:50
[Comment From KathleenKathleen: ] 
What are the typical course requirements for aspiring teachers about technology?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:50 Kathleen
2:51
Odin Jurkowski: 
Pam: Get them to the next level by slowing building those skills. Take it a step at a time, a lesson at a time, a module at a time, etc. Scaffolding, whether it be about technology or anything else, means that students need to build upon that prior knowledge and then take it a step further.  
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:51 Odin Jurkowski
2:51
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin: See Q from Lisa G. Are there other programs you look to for ideas?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:51 Sean Cavanagh
2:52
[Comment From Lisa GLisa G: ] 
What would you say are the premier technologically forward teacher training programs available right now in higher education (undergraduate as well as post-graduate)?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:52 Lisa G
2:54
Sean Cavanagh: 
Danielle: I believe your program at Clemson encourages teacher ed students to partner with students from other disciplines. What's the benefit of that?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:54 Sean Cavanagh
2:54
Odin Jurkowski: 
Lisa, that's a good question. I don't know what the premier programs are. I think we tend to work in our silos quite a bit. But you learn a little here and there from other institutions from conference conversations, if you are part of an accreditation team as a reviewer, if you are active with your state board of education. I think we all learn a little from each other.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:54 Odin Jurkowski
2:54
Danielle Herro: 
Course requirements at Clemson:
(1) Use and critique of 5-6 different genres of tools, embedded in instruction (social media tools, productivity tools, game/app design tools, collaborative tools, mobile technologies+Apps)
(2) A project that they create and garner feedback on (Google Form) that incorporates ISTE Nets, Connected Learning Principles and CCSS that is content-focused and highlights the use of digital tools form a learner perspective
(3) We read, discuss, have debates in class as well
(4) Students complete 4-5 reflections on their work above
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:54 Danielle Herro
2:55
Sean Cavanagh: 
Odin -- my understanding is your program at the U of Central Missouri gives students the option of teaching the courses they design to peers. What's the payoff from that, in your view?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:55 Sean Cavanagh
2:57
Danielle Herro: 
Teacher ed students partner with other students (typically from the Schools of Computing, Architecture, and Engineering) in our Digital Media and Learning Labs around interest-based projects, or for help with their coursework projects. The benefit is sharing collective expertise - some of our students are whiz-kids in the audio or video production room, others with the 3-D printer - and they help each other.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:57 Danielle Herro
2:57
Odin Jurkowski: 
Sean, I think the payoff is both for the student and then all of the other students in the program. The student designing and teaching the course gets the experience. We all know you learn so much more when you actually have to teach it to someone else. Then all of the other students in the program gain by having a greater variety of electives to choose from.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:57 Odin Jurkowski
2:57
Sean Cavanagh: 
Big picture Q for you both from Dave:
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:57 Sean Cavanagh
2:57
[Comment From DaveDave: ] 
The culture and structures in colleges also seem to be an obstacle in moving to greater technology integration for pre-service teacher ed. Faculty are busy with research, committees, advising (in addition to their teaching load), and they are often only able to by out some of their time with research dollars. However, there aren't very many opportunities to be funded to redesign a course, so it is only done by those who want to put in the extra work or those who prioritize it above the other activities in their positions. Is this common elsewhere? Have others seen successful models to push technology integration forward - maybe summer salary for course redesign? Internal mini-grants? Partnerships or sponsored funding from business partners?
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:57 Dave
2:58
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Regarding PD, there are a number of online free conferences available worldwide at different times that provide ideas about technology being used AND more important how it is being used in different subject areas and grade levels (e.g., Classroom 2.0, STEM Conference, Library 2.0, etc.) I've found these very helpful to keep up to date and gain ideas for instruction.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 2:58 Guest
3:00
Danielle Herro: 
Dave - you are definitely right about the culture! Course redesign will have little impact if the organizational culture doesn't support innovation and some risk-taking. I think having a vision, starting small, asking for help form those who have expertise, and allowing for a bit of failure or iterative design is important. Summer work and partnerships with other forward-thinking departments - along with making sure leadership in on-board would be my suggestion.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:00 Danielle Herro
3:01
Odin Jurkowski: 
Dave, that is an issue. Redesigning a course is time intensive. We don't have funding or release time to do so. However, most good teachers are always improving and changing their courses on a regular basis. This incremental approach works most of the time, but some times you just want to start from scratch. I wish we could incentivize all faculty to have the time to do so. It's also why I think changing up schedules and having faculty teach a course they haven't done before can breath new life into it.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:01 Odin Jurkowski
3:01
Sean Cavanagh: 
That's all the time we have today, folks. A big thanks to our guests, Danielle Herro of Clemson U., and Odin Jurkowski of the U of Central Missouri. A transcript will be posted soon!
Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:01 Sean Cavanagh
3:02
Danielle Herro: 
Thank you! It was great to chat with everyone.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:02 Danielle Herro
3:02
Odin Jurkowski: 

Thank you Sean and Danielle and everyone that attended!



Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:02 Odin Jurkowski
3:02
Stacey Decker: 
Thanks again to Sean and our guests Odin and Danielle for a great conversation today. Like Sean said, we'll have a transcript of this chat available on this same page later today.
Tuesday February 18, 2014 3:02 Stacey Decker
3:03
 

 
 
 

Teacher Colleges Ramp Up Technology Focus

Tuesday, February 18, 2013, 2 to 3 p.m. ET

Teacher colleges have been criticized by those who say they are failing to give aspiring and practicing educators the skills they need to use technology to improve student instruction. But some higher education institutions are trying to head in bold new directions on that front, by redesigning course and curricula and encouraging K-12 teachers to make wise use of a variety of digital tools.

This live chat brought together a pair of college faculty members, who talked about how their teacher education programs have been refashioned for demands of the digital age. Odin Jurkowski is a professor of educational technology at the University of Central Missouri, which has added certificates and degrees focused on online teaching and offers a course to encourage future teachers to create their own online classes. Danielle Herro is an assistant professor and the co-director of the digital media and learning and gaming labs at Clemson University, which has increased course requirements in technology and established forums in which teachers-in-training share ideas about how to weave digital lessons into the classroom.

Guests:
Odin Jurkowski, chair of the department of career and technology education at the University of Central Missouri, in Warrensburg, Mo.
Danielle Herro, assistant professor of digital media and learning at Clemson University, in South Carolina.

Sean Cavanagh, staff writer, Education Week, moderated this chat.

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