Video

Will Cameras in Special Education Classrooms Protect Students?

April 5, 2017 6:17

Students with disabilities are far more likely to be abused in schools than the general student population, and many feel that videocamera surveilance is the best way of monitoring and preventing such behavior. Texas parent Breggett Rideau is one of them - after her special needs son was physically abused by a teacher, she launched a successful campaign to install cameras statewide. This year, Texas became the first state in the country to start requiring cameras in special education classrooms, and other states are considering similar laws. But are cameras the best solution? Detractors cite cost and privacy issues, while disability advocacy groups push for other measures to prevent abuse. Exploring both sides of the issue, Education Week correspondent Kavitha Cardoza reports from Keller, Texas. This video originally aired on PBS NewsHour on April 4, 2017.

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