Law and Courts

The latest news about legal issues in education including articles, Commentaries, and special features.

Mrs. Ella J. Rice talks to one of her pupils, all of whom are white, in a 3rd grade classroom of the Draper Elementary School in southeast Washington, D.C., September 13, 1954. This was the first day of non-segregated schools for both teachers and pupils in the District of Columbia public school system. Mrs. Rice was the only black teacher in the school.
—AP

65 Years After 'Brown v. Board,' Where Are All the Black Educators?

The landmark Supreme Court decision that integrated schools 65 years ago had an unintended effect that’s still felt today: Thousands of black teachers and principals lost their jobs. (May 14, 2019)

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06/12 01:20 pm | Justice Dept. Backs Religious School Choice in Case on Maine Tuition Program | The Trump administration backs three families seeking to require the state of Maine to pay tuition for their children to attend religious high schools.

Spotlight on ESSA

In this Spotlight, learn what ESSA's implementation will mean for teacher evaluation, early-childhood programs, literacy, and more.

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A federal appellate panel upheld an injunction requiring a Wisconsin district to let a student who was born female and now identifies as male use the boys' restroom.
June 7, 2017 – Education Week
More than a dozen states have been weighing bills to expand free-speech and free-press protections for student journalists and their teacher-advisers.
June 7, 2017 – Education Week
As the Trump administration pushes for federally backed vouchers, there are major concerns about whether some participating private schools would abide by civil rights and anti-discrimination laws.
June 7, 2017 – Education Week
Lone Star State lawmakers passed bills to crack down on cyberbullying and alter the state's letter-grade system for schools, but failed to clear the way for the use of vouchers and education savings accounts, or to overhaul the K-12 funding formula.
June 7, 2017 – Education Week
The barriers are formidable, and can lead to long, grueling fights: Public schools in many states enjoy powerful shields, including caps on damages if they lose a lawsuit and high legal hurdles to prove misconduct.
May 22, 2017 – AP
The Associated Press reviewed verdicts and settlements across the country in lawsuits brought against schools over student-on-student sexual abuse.
May 22, 2017 – AP
Those who lobby on behalf of public school educators, civil rights issues, and education funding say they're fighting what feels like a multifront war.
May 17, 2017 – Education Week
A federal judge will allow Gardendale, Ala., to form its own school district of mostly white students in spite of her criticism that city leaders are doing so as a way to control racial demographics in public schools.
May 10, 2017 – Education Week
Spurred on by new flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act and by revenue shortfalls, state legislators scrap over who should be in charge of education policy and how to better spend K-12 dollars, among other issues.
May 10, 2017 – Education Week
A dispute not directly related to education has the potential to weaken or eliminate one of the last legal barriers to vouchers for use at private religious schools.
April 14, 2017 – Education Week

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