Law and Courts

The latest news about legal issues in education including articles, Commentaries, and special features.

Mrs. Ella J. Rice talks to one of her pupils, all of whom are white, in a 3rd grade classroom of the Draper Elementary School in southeast Washington, D.C., September 13, 1954. This was the first day of non-segregated schools for both teachers and pupils in the District of Columbia public school system. Mrs. Rice was the only black teacher in the school.
—AP

65 Years After 'Brown v. Board,' Where Are All the Black Educators?

The landmark Supreme Court decision that integrated schools 65 years ago had an unintended effect that’s still felt today: Thousands of black teachers and principals lost their jobs. (May 14, 2019)

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07/17 07:32 am | Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a Voice for Student Rights, Dies at 99 | Stevens served 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, ruling for student rights, racial equality, and a high wall of separation between church and state.

Spotlight on ESSA

In this Spotlight, learn what ESSA's implementation will mean for teacher evaluation, early-childhood programs, literacy, and more.

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Despite leaders' messages of defiance and solidarity, reminders of the Supreme Court's recent decision to abolish agency fees—and its financial implications for teachers' unions—were everywhere at the National Education Association's yearly convention.
July 18, 2018 – Education Week
The just-concluded U.S. Supreme Court term included a blockbuster union rights ruling, the announced retirement of a justice influential on education issues, and a variety of rulings with relevance for K-12.
July 17, 2018 – Education Week
A bill shielding what is now Ohio's largest online school and its sponsor from the negative consequences of accepting thousands of former Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow students is headed to Gov. John Kasich for his signature.
June 28, 2018 – McClatchy-Tribune
Here are some key passages from the majority and dissenting opinions in the Supreme Court ruling on Janus v. AFSCME.
June 27, 2018 – Education Week
A highly influential moderate-conservative at the center of the U.S. Supreme Court for three decades, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote major opinions on race, religion, and other areas of public education.
July 18, 2018 – Education Week
Teachers already make less than comparable employees, and the 'Janus' decision could make things worse, writes Celine McNicholas.
June 27, 2018 – Education Week
We should be cheered by the 'Janus' ruling, but not because it weakens teachers’ unions, writes the Cato Institute’s Neal McCluskey.
June 27, 2018 – Education Week
Teacher and other public employee unions can’t collect agency fees from nonmembers, the court ruled in the Janus case, a decision that could hurt unions' revenue and membership numbers.
July 18, 2018 – Education Week
Driven by concerns about school safety and a wave of teacher activism over pay, state legislatures tackled contentious education topics in recent sessions, despite the campaign-year hazards.
June 20, 2018 – Education Week
The Supreme Court is poised to deliver a blow to the teachers' unions any day now—and labor groups are trying to get ahead of it by pushing controversial state bills.
June 14, 2018 – Education Week

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