Law and Courts

The latest news about legal issues in education including articles, opinion essays, and special features.

Kelsey and Dusty Jones walk with their daughter, Cali, at Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. Three different parents at Stillwater are plaintiffs in a case to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court over Montana’s tax-credit scholarship program.
Tailyr Irvine for Education Week

High Court Case Tests Religious Schools' Use of Tax-Credit Scholarships

A national debate over whether public funds may go to faith-based schools is high on the list of cases before the Supreme Court in the coming term, stemming from a dispute in Montana. (September 30, 2019)

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01/22 02:39 pm | In Arguments, U.S. Supreme Court Leans Toward Support for Religious School Aid | In a case from Montana, conservative justices suggested they were inclined to rule for parents who seek to reinstate a state tax credit funding scholarships for use at ...

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The Supreme Court’s 1969 ‘Tinker’ ruling in the case of students wearing black armbands remains a touchstone in the robust debate over the rights of free expression in public schools.
February 27, 2019 – Education Week
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February 13, 2019 – Education Week
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February 13, 2019 – Education Week
A growing movement to shed Confederate names on public schools has drawn attention in recent years. But public schools named in honor of segregationists haven't drawn the same level of scrutiny.
January 23, 2019 – Education Week
In interviews with Education Week, some teachers said they’ve seen lesson plans they created being sold by other people on Teachers Pay Teachers, and that the company isn’t going far enough to stop copyright infringement.
January 15, 2019 – Education Week
The Kentucky Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a law that made changes to the state's struggling public pension system eight months after it prompted thousands of teachers to protest, closing schools across the state.
December 13, 2018 – AP
The odds may be long for a newly filed lawsuit that asserts students have a Constitutional right to civics learning, but some experts say the timing is spot on.
December 12, 2018 – Education Week
Is the current political climate rekindling interest in teaching about the U.S. Constitution? That's what some civics teachers, law experts, and leaders of national groups are saying.
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Restraint and seclusion is controversial in the special education community; one in 100 students with special needs was restrained or secluded in the 2013-14 school year, according to federal data.
November 28, 2018 – Education Week
With two new books for young people and her work with the iCivics organization, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor devotes time off the bench to topics close to her heart.
November 14, 2018 – Education Week

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