Diversity

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Fugitive slaves fleeing from Maryland to Delaware by way of the “Underground Railroad,” 1850-1851. Some educators say that classroom simulations of the Underground Railroad and other historical events related to slavery, designed to foster empathy, can actually minimize horrific events.
—Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

Do Simulations Have a Place in Lessons on Slavery?

Some teachers simulate slavery in their classrooms to try to foster empathy. But in practice, many educators say, these activities can minimize horrific events, recreate racist power dynamics, and cause emotional hurt to black students. (March 27, 2019)

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Learning the Language Blog

10/08 04:15 pm | For English-Learners to Excel, More Collaboration Needed, Researcher Argues | A 'lack of communication and collaboration' between researchers who focus on English-learners and those who specialize in content areas such as English, mathematics, ...

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Hidden Inequities
This reporting series highlights some of the unseen disparities that contribute to achievement gaps among students across the nation.

Teaching America’s English-Language Learners
Articles in this special report explore the efforts states and school districts are making to effectively teach English-language learners.

Raising Kings: A Year of Love and Struggle at Ron Brown College Prep (Audio Series)
The three-part audio series Raising Kings profiles a high school for young men of color in Washington, D.C., where educators devote as much time to meeting the social-emotional needs of their students as they do their academic needs.

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Identifying and serving advanced ELLs can not only help districts respond to new federal reporting requirements, but build a stronger gifted program too.

Building Bridges to Success for English-Language Learners
Join us for a conversation with researchers and educators to explore how to build bridges, not barriers, to success for English-learners.

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Teachers work their magic with students all the time, building community and trust. What would school be like if principals worked that same magic with teachers, wonders Jonathon Medeiros.
October 9, 2019 – Teacher
Harvard University does not discriminate against Asian Americans in its admissions process, a federal judge ruled Tuesday in a lawsuit that reignited a national debate over affirmative action.
October 1, 2019 – AP
It's high time to question the place of Shakespeare in our classrooms, writes middle school teacher Christina Torres. Our kids deserve to study stories that represent and validate their experiences and cultures. But throwing the Bard out entirely isn't the answer either.
October 1, 2019 – Teacher
A plan to only grant Little Rock partial control of its schools is drawing complaints that the district may further segregate 62 years after nine black students were escorted into an all-white high school.
September 25, 2019 – AP
It's a question that district leadership needs to answer—with action, not just words, writes Rann Miller.
September 25, 2019 – Education Week
Districts try "grow your own" programs to build an educator workforce that mirrors their changing student body.
September 18, 2019 – Education Week
In this Q&A, education researcher Lisa Delpit discusses a new book of essays by teachers, principals, and other educators on how to teach in a fraught political climate.
September 18, 2019 – Education Week
Colin Turner thought he understood the dynamics of race and privilege. Until one of his students called him out for some insensitive comments he'd made in class.
September 17, 2019 – Teacher
Teacher education must help everyone think critically of the world to avoid perpetuating inequity, urges Hui-Ling Malone.
September 11, 2019 – Education Week
Court-ordered school desegregation has been more successful in the South than in any other region of the country, but researchers have noted a new threat: the growing number of communities that are seceding from larger school districts to form their own.
September 11, 2019 – Education Week

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