Ed-Tech Policy

Job-Training Initiative Aims To Fill High-Tech Slots

By Joetta L. Sack — October 08, 1997 2 min read

Washington

Citing a severe shortage of workers qualified for information-technology jobs, the Department of Education, along with other federal agencies and private companies, announced a collaboration last week to recruit and train more workers and students to fill the jobs.

Leaders of the federal agencies and businesses pointed to a new Department of Commerce report that addresses the shortage and calls for more recruitment and training in technology-related careers.

For More Information

The report is free from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Technology Policy, 14th Street and Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20230; (202) 482-3037.

The Information Technology Association of America estimates that 190,000 information-technology jobs are currently unfilled because of a lack of qualified workers, and that number is expected to grow in the future. Another 95,000 such jobs will open up each year through 2005, according to the Arlington, Va.-based trade association.

The jobs involve working with computer-based information systems in positions such as software developer, systems analyst, and computer programmer.

“These changes will not only affect a few elite engineers and scientists with Ph.D’s, but a large part of our labor force,” Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley said in a written statement.

Four-year college programs are producing only a small percentage of the workers needed, according to the Commerce Department report, which also promotes several of President Clinton’s initiatives, including new national tests in math and science, school-to-work programs, and the Hope Scholarship program.

To do its part, the Education Department pledged to help identify the best job-training programs for schools and businesses to emulate, Mr. Riley said.

Cisco Systems Initiative

In a related effort, Cisco Systems Inc., a San Jose, Calif.-based computer-hardware and -software manufacturer, has launched an initiative to prepare students for high-technology jobs.

The company recently invested $18 million in a four-semester curriculum, equipment, and other resources to train more than 1,000 students in 57 schools beginning this year, with plans to expand the program in the future.

Cisco expects that many of those students will be able to get high-tech jobs after completing the two-year program either in high school, technical school, or community college.

Cisco executives joined Democratic senators last week at a conference that brought demonstrations of cutting-edge educational technology to Capitol Hill.

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif, called business involvement in career training “a win-win scenario for our students and corporate America.”

Several Democrats used the conference to push for more school technology funding. The House appropriations bill for fiscal 1998 would increase funding for the Technology Literacy Challenge Fund to $425 million, up from $200 million in 1997. The Senate’s bill would fund technology under an amendment that would turn most federal K-12 education funding into block grants. (“Block Grant Compromise Put Forward,” Oct. 1, 1997)

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Interactive Learning Best Practices: Creative Ways Interactive Displays Engage Students
Students and teachers alike struggle in our newly hybrid world where learning takes place partly on-site and partly online. Focus, engagement, and motivation have become big concerns in this transition. In this webinar, we will
Content provided by Samsung
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Educator-Driven EdTech Design: Help Shape the Future of Classroom Technology
Join us for a collaborative workshop where you will get a live demo of GoGuardian Teacher, including seamless new integrations with Google Classroom, and participate in an interactive design exercise building a feature based on
Content provided by GoGuardian
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: What Did We Learn About Schooling Models This Year?
After a year of living with the pandemic, what schooling models might we turn to as we look ahead to improve the student learning experience? Could year-round schooling be one of them? What about online

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Ed-Tech Policy Millions of Students Got Free Home Internet for Remote Learning. How Long Will It Last?
Time and money are running out on temporary agreements between districts and ISPs. Broadband advocates want a federal solution.
10 min read
Cupped hands hold a precious wi-fi symbol
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and Digital Vision Vectors/Getty
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Ed-Tech Policy Whitepaper
Using E-rate Funds to Enhance School Networks
This guide offers a roadmap to help K-12 leaders successfully leverage federal funds to expand digital learning opportunities for their students.
Content provided by Spectrum Enterprise
Ed-Tech Policy FCC Takes One Step Closer to Offering E-Rate Funds for Remote Learning Technology
Advocates have urged the FCC to loosen its rules on E-Rate funds so schools can pay for technology that helps students learn remotely.
2 min read
Andrew Burstein, 13, participates in a virtual class through Don Estridge High Tech Middle School in Delray Beach, Fla., this school year.
Andrew Burstein, 13, participates in a virtual class through Don Estridge High Tech Middle School in Delray Beach, Fla., this school year.
Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
Ed-Tech Policy New York Banned Facial Recognition in Schools. Will Other States Follow?
New York schools are prohibited from using the widely criticized biometric identifying technology until at least July 2022.
3 min read
Girl looking into smartphone facial recognition
Getty