Teaching Profession Tracker

Educators We’ve Lost to the Coronavirus

Some of the teachers, principals, coaches, counselors, and other staff members who’ve died
April 03, 2020 | Corrected: April 26, 2022 | Updated: May 16, 2022 1 min read
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Corrected: An earlier version of this gallery listed the same teacher’s death twice. It has been updated.

COVID-19 has taken at least 1 million American lives—young and old, men and women, people of all backgrounds.

Among the educators we’ve lost was a teacher who’d taught her students online the day before she died. Another was a school climate counselor at his alma mater who supported students struggling with behavior. Some of them had retired, but are still vividly remembered for their deep impact on students’ lives.

As of April 22, 2022, at least 1,299 active and retired K-12 educators and personnel have died of COVID-19. Of those, 448 were active teachers.

In this memorial, we remember some of the dedicated educators lost to their communities and to the field.

Do you know someone who is not already in this memorial? Please tell us about them.

In addition to our own reporting and reader submissions, here are some other sources Education Week has used to identify and/or confirm names to include in this gallery: Amalgamated Transit Union memorial, American Federation of Teachers memorial, Dignitymemorial.com, Google alerts and search of local media reports, Legacy.com, Lexis-Nexis, @losttocovid Twitter account, the United Federation of Teachers memorial, and the UTLA memorial.

Click the tabs to see the educators we’ve lost to the coronavirus in past years. Please allow time for the galleries to fully load.

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Vol. 39, Issue 37, Page 1

Published in Print: July 15, 2020, as Immeasurable Loss

Reporting: Lesli A. Maxwell
Design/Visualization: Emma Patti Harris

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